London Review of English and Foreign Literature

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Cox and Bigg, 1776
 

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Seite 415 - IN beauty, or wit, No mortal as yet To question your empire has dared; But men of discerning Have thought that in learning, To yield to a lady was hard.
Seite 178 - THE annual labour of every nation is the fund which originally supplies it with all the necessaries and conveniences of life which it annually consumes, and which consist always either in the immediate produce of that labour, or in what is purchased with that produce from other nations.
Seite 124 - ... they are desirous of arming their disciples against the fear of death, they inculcate, as an obvious, though melancholy position, that the fatal stroke of our dissolution releases us from the calamities of life, and that those can no longer suffer who no longer exist.
Seite 127 - Grotius. a man of genius and learning, who preserved his moderation amidst the fury of contending sects, and who composed the annals of his own age and country at a time when the invention of printing had facilitated the means of intelligence and increased the danger of detection.
Seite 512 - Nor is this more incompatible with the precepts, than with the object of this religion, which is the attainment of the kingdom of heaven ; for valour is not that sort of violence by which that kingdom is to be taken, nor are the turbulent spirits of heroes and conquerors admissible into those regions of peace, subordination, and tranquillity.
Seite 349 - ... wears the same garter and motto as those of the noble Order of St George in England. Upon the whole, he has a melancholy, mortified appearance.
Seite 181 - ... the brickmaker, the bricklayer, the workmen who attend the furnace, the millwright, the forger, the smith, must all of them join their different arts in order to produce them.
Seite 186 - First, by affording a great and ready market for the rude produce of the country, they gave encouragement to its cultivation and further improvement. This benefit was not even confined to the countries in which they were situated, but extended more or less to all those with which they had any dealings.
Seite 186 - The one is not afraid to lay out at once a large capital upon the improvement of his land when he has a probable prospect of raising the value of it in proportion to the expense.
Seite 272 - ... number of pieces; but the real wealth or poverty of the country, they allow, would depend altogether upon the abundance or scarcity of those consumable goods.

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