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tard begot, bastard instructed, bastard in mind, bastard in valour, in every thing illegitimate. One bear will not bitc another, and wherefore should one bastard? Take liced, the quarrel's most ominous to us: if the son of a whore fight for a whore, he tempts judgement: farewell, bastard.

(Erii. Yar. The devil take thee, coward!

[Exit.

SCENE VIII. Another jar' of the plains.

Enter HECTOR.
Hect. Most putrified core, so fair without,
Thy goodly armour thus hath cost thy life.
Now is my day's work done; I'll take good breath:
Rest, sword; thou hast thy fill of blood and death.

[Puts off his helmet and hangs his shield behind him.

Enter Achilles and Myrmidons.
Achil. Look, Hector, how the sun begins to set;
How ugly night comes breathing at his heels:
Even with the vail and darking of the sun,
To close the day up, Hector's life is done.

Hect. I am unarm’d; forego this vantage, Greek.
Achil. Strike, fellows, strike; this is the man I seek.

(Hector falls. 10 So, Ilion, fall thou next! now, Troy, sink down! Here lies thy heart, thy sinews, and thy bone. On, Myrmidons, and cry you all amain, “Achilles hath the mighty Hector slain.”

(4 retreat sounded. Ilark! a retire upon our Grecian part.

Myr. The Trojan trumpets sound the like, my lord.

Achil. The dragon wing of night o'erspreads the earth, And, stickler-like, the armies separates. My half-supp'd sword, that frankly would have fed, Pleased with this dainty bait, thus goes to bed.

20

[Sheathes his sword. Come, tie his body to my horse's tail; Along the field I will the Trojan trail.

[Exeunt.

SCENE IX. Another part of the plains. Enter AGAMEMNON, AJAX, MENELAUS. NESTOR, Dio

MEDES, and others, marching. Shouts within. Agam. Hark! hark! what shout is that?

Nest. Peace, drums! [Within) Achilles! Achilles! Hector's slain! Achilles!

Dio. The bruit is, lector's slain, and by Achilies.

Ajax. If it be so, yet bragless let it bc; Greit Hector was al inan as good as he.

gam. Marchi patiently long: let one bc sent To pray Achilles see us at our tent. If in his death the gods have us befriendel, Great Troy is ours, and our sharp wars are ended. 10

(Ercunt, marching.

SCENE X. Another part of the plains.

Enter Æneas and Trojans.
Ene. Stand, ho! yet are we masters of the field:
Never go home; here starve we out the night.

Enter TROILUS.
Tro. Ilector is slain.
AU.

Hector! the gods forbid!
Tro. He's dead; and at the murderer's horse's tail,
In beastly sort, dragg'd through the shameful field.
Frown 0:, you heavens, effect your rage with speed!
Sit, gods, upon your thrones, and smile at Troy!
I say, at once let your brief plagues be mercy,
And linger not our sure destructions on!

Æne. My lord, you do discomfort all the host. 10

Tro. You understand me not that tell me so:
I do not speak of flight, of fear, of death,
But dare all imminence that gods and men
Address their dangers in. Hector is gone:
Who shall tell Priam so, or Hecuba?
Let him that will a screech-owl aye be callid,
Go in to Troy, and say there, Hector's dead:
There is a word will Priam turn to stone;
Make wells and Niobes of the maids and wives,
Coid statues of the youth, and, in a word,

20
Scare Troy out of itself. But, march away:
Hector is de:d; there is no more to say.
Stay yet. You vile abominable tents,
Thus proudly pight upon our Phrygian plains,
Let Titan rise as early as lic dare.
I'll through and through you! and, thou grcat-sized coward,
No space of carth shall suinder our two hates:
I'll haunt thec like a wicked conscience still,
That moulilcih goblins swift as frenzy's thoughts.
Strike a free march to Troy! with comfort go:

30 Hope of revenge shall lide our inward woe.

[E.reunt Æneas and Trojans. A: TROILUS is going out, enter, from the other side, Pax.

DARUS. Pan. But hear you, hear you!

Tro. Hence, broker-lackey! ignomy and shame Pursue thy life, and live aye with thy name! [Erit.

Pan. A goodly medicine for my aching bones! O world! world! world! thus is the poor agent despised! O traitors and bawds, how earnestly are you set a-work, and how ili requited! why should our endeavour be so loved and the performance so loathed? what verse for it? what instance for it? Let me see:

41
Full merrily the humble-bec doth sing,
Till he hath lost his honey and his sting:
And being once subdued in armed tail,

Sweet honey and sweet notes together fail.
Good traders in the flesh, set this in your painted clothis.
As many as be here of pander's ball,
Your eyes, half out, weep out at Pandar's fall;
Or if you cannot weep, yet give some groans,

50 Though not for me, yet for your aching bones, Brethren and sisters of the hold door trade, Some: two months hence my will shall here be made: It should be now, but that my fear is this, Some galled goose of Winchester would hiss: Till then I'll sweat and seck about for eases, And at that time bequeathe you my diseases. [Eri

CORIOLANUS.

DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
Catus MARCIUS, afterwards CAICS Conspirators with Aufidius.
MARCITY CORIOLANUS.

A Citizen of Antium.
TiTu's LARTIUS, generals against Two Volscian Guards.
COMINIUS,

the Volscians.

VOLUMNIA, mother of Coriolanus. MENENTUS AGRIPPA, friend to Coriolanus.

VIRGILIA, wife to Coriolanus. SICINIUS VELUTUS, | tribunes of

VALERIA, friend to Virgilia. JUNIUS BRUTUS, the people.

Gentlewoman, attending on Vir. Young MARCIUS, son to Coriola

gilia. nus.

Roman and Volscian Senators, A Roman Herald.

Patricians, Ædiles, Lictors, SolTULLUS AUFIDIUS, general of the diers, Citizens, Messengers Ser Volscians.

vants to Aufidius, and other Lieutenant to Aufidius.

Attendants. SCENE: Rome and the neighbourhood; Corioli and the neigh

bourhood; Antium.

ACT I.

SCENE I. Rome. A street, Enter a company of mutinous Citizens, with staces, clubs, and

other weapons. First Cit. Before we proceed any further, hear me speak. AU. Speak, spcak.

First Cit. You are all resolved rather to die than to lamish?

All. Resolved, resolved.

First Cit. First, you know Caius Marcius is chief enemy to the people.

AU. We know't, we know't.

First Cit. Let us kill him, and we'll have corn at our own price. Is't a verdict?

11 All. No more talking on't; let it be donc: away, away! &c. Cit. One word, good citizens.

First Cit. We are accounted poor citizens, the patricians good. What authority surfeits on would relieve us: if

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they would yield us but the superfluity, while it were wholesome, we might guess they relieved us humanely; but they think we are too dear: the leanness that afflicts us, the object of our misery, is as an inventory to particu. larize their abundance; our sufferance is a gain to them. Let us revenge this with our pikes, ere we become rakes: for the gods know I speak this in hunger for bread, not in thirst for revenge.

Sec. Crt. Would you proceed especially against Caius Marcius?

AU. Against him first: he's a very dog to the commonalty.

Sec. Cit. Consider you what services he bas done for his comtry?

First Cit. Very well; and could be content to give bim good report fort, but that he pays himself with being proud.

Sec. Cit. Nay, but speak not maliciously.

First Cit. I say unto you, what lie hath done famously. he did it to that end: though soft-conscienced men can bc content to say it was for his country, le did it to please his mother, and to be partly proud; which lie is, even to the altitude of his virtue.

41 Sec. Cit. What he cannot help in his nature, you account a vice in lim. You must in no way say he is coretous.

First Cit. If I must not, I need not be barren of accusations; he hail faults, with surplus, to tire in repetition. [Shouts within.) What shouts are these? The oilier side o' the city is risen: why stay we prating here? to the Capitol! AU. Come, come.

50 First Cit. Soft! who comes here?

Enter MENENIUS AGRIPPA. Sec. Cit. Worthy Menenius Agrippa; one that liath always loved the people.

First Cit. He's one honest cnough: would all the rest were so! Men. What work's, my countrymen, in hand? wliere 8:

you Wití bats ard clubs? The matter? speak, I pray you.

First Cit. Our business is not unknown to the senate; they have had inkling this fortnight what we intend to do, which now we'll show 'em in deeds. They say poor suitors bave strong brcatiis: they shall know we have strong arms too.

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