Analysis of the Game of Chess

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S.H. Parker, 1826 - 252 Seiten
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Seite 14 - ... ready on all occasions. For life is a kind of chess, in which we have often points to gain, and competitors, or adversaries to contend with, and in which there is a vast variety of good and ill events, that are, in some degree the effects of prudence, or the want of it.
Seite 15 - Circumspection, which surveys the whole chessboard, or scene of action ; the relations of the several pieces and situations, the dangers they are respectively exposed to, the several possibilities of their aiding each other, the probabilities that the adversary may...
Seite 14 - If I move this piece, what will be the advantage of my new situation? What use can my adversary make of it to annoy me? What other moves can I make to support it and to defend myself from his attacks?
Seite 14 - The game of chess is not merely an idle amusement. Several very valuable qualities of the mind, useful in the course of human life, are to be acquired or strengthened by it, so as to become habits, ready on all occasions. For life is a kind of chess, in which we have often points to gain, and competitors or adversaries to contend with, and in which there is a vast variety of good and evil events that are in some degree the effects of prudence or the want of it.
Seite 15 - Caution, not to make our moves too hastily. This habit is best acquired by observing strictly the laws of the game; such as, " If you touch a piece, you must move it somewhere; if you set it down, you must let it stand...
Seite 132 - If he had played his queen any where else, she would have been cramped ; therefore he offers to change, that in case you refuse, he may place her at her third square, where she would be extremely well posted.
Seite 14 - America, and it begins lately to make its appearance in these states. It is so interesting in itself, as not to need the view of gain to induce engaging in it ; and thence it is never played for money.
Seite 17 - If it is agreed not to observe the rules exactly, but one party demands indulgences, he should then be as willing to allow them to the other.
Seite 15 - ... and it is therefore best that these rules should be observed ; as the game thereby becomes more the image of human life, and particularly of war ; in which, if you have incautiously put yourself into a bad and dangerous position, you cannot obtain your enemy's leave to withdraw your troops, and place them more securely, but you must abide all the consequences of your rashness. And, lastly, we learn by chess the habit of not being discouraged by present bad appearances in the state of our affairs,...
Seite 31 - STALEMATE. When one party has his King so circumstanced that, not being at the moment in check, he cannot play him without going into check, and at the same time has no other Piece or Pawn to move instead, he is said to be stalemated, and the game is considered drawn. (See diagram No. 17.) TAKING A PAWN EN PASSANT, OR IN PASSING.

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