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diet. William and Edmund. The family residence is on Dawson street, in the borough of Kane.

THOMAS KEELOR, lumber merchant, Wetmore, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1832. He was reared and educated in his native city, remaining there until thirty years of age. In 1862 he came to Pennsylvania, located on Oil creek, and became engaged in the oil trade. In 1864 he made large purchases of timber land near Wetmore, McKoan county, and erected a steam saw-mill, and dwelling-houses for his employees. He has been successful in this business, and now has another mill on the Tionesta. His mills are connected by a steel-track road, stocked with his own cars. By perseverance and indomitable will, Mr. Keelor has made from the heart of the forest the thriving town of Wetmore, which is now one of the pleasant towns of the county. He has made all the improvements, even to the cutting of the roads. He has 100 men in his employ, and both the mills have a capacity of turning out 100,000 feet of lumber daily. Mr. Keelor is one of the able men of the county, and one of the representative lumbermen. In addition to his large lumber interests he is engaged in the mercantile business, and also is farming to a large extent, owning considerable available farming land, and in all his varied interests he ranks among the foremost men in the county. Four of his sons are employed as heads of as many departments in their father's business. Mr. Keelor is descended from an old American family, his paternal grandfather having served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war. This patriot moved from Camden, N. J., in 1812, to Hamilton county, Ohio, which was then a dense wilderness, but is now the most populous county in the State.

O. G. KELTS, jeweler, Kane, was born in Ridgway, Elk Co., Penn., in 1860, a son of O. P. and Ardissa (Wilcox) Kelts, natives of Potter county, where they were married. They moved to Ridgway and thence to Horton, and from there to Erie city, where the father died; the mother now lives at New Castle. They had two children: Orrin C. and O. G. After the death of his father O. G. Kelts lived with his grandmother several years, and then with C. Holes, at Ridgway, of whom he learned the jeweler's trade. In 1882 he came to Kane, where he began work at his trade, but now keeps a store, supplied with a good stock of watches, jewelry, etc., in addition to which he is a dealer in general merchandise. During Cleveland's administration Mr. Kelts was appointed postmaster at Kane. He is a member of Kane Lodge, No. 566, F. & A. M. Mr. Kelts was married, Feb. 2, 1882, to Ella Wicks, and they have one child, Clyde.

C. H. KEMP, proprietor of the " Thompson House,'' Kane. This house, which was designed as a summer resort, is delightfully located in the mountainous regions of Northern Pennsylvania, and is accessible by the Philadelphia & Erie and the Pittsburgh & Western division of the Pennsylvania Railroad. It is situated at an altitude of nearly 2,100 feet above sea level, and on the most elevated point of that region. Pure air and water are here afforded, making it a healthful resort during the heat of the summer months. Good fishing for lovers of the piscatorial sport, and romantic drives also commend the place to those in search of amusement in that line. With cuisine department unsurpassed, and a thriving borough near by of several thousand population, with none of the objectionable features found at many of the watering places, it is eminently designed as a home for those seeking rest and recreation. Mr. Kemp was reared on a farm, and at the beginning of the war of the Rebellion he enlisted in Company H, Third West Virginia Infantry, and was afterward placed on detached duty in the quartermaster's department. He was offered promotion, but declined. After the war he returned to Winchester, and until 1867 was in mercantile business. From 1867 to 1874 he was manager of Bolits suppression. How he raised, in McKean, Elk and neighboring counties, the celebrated "Bucktails," and his battles, wounds and promotion have become a part of the history of the war more than of these counties. In 1864. crippled by many wounds, he returned to the mountains to revive his former projects for peopling the wilderness. The village of Kane was planned by him as a Prohibition Borough, but the act of incorporation was lost [sic] after its passage and before receiving the governor's signature. He endeavored to give effect to his views on this question by placing restrictions on all village lots, but a method of circumventing him was found by the liquor men, and from 1867 to 1878 he contented himself with personal efforts at license court. In 1878 a more effective restriction was found, and the subsequent growth of the town has been on land protected against liquor shops. The McKean, Elk, Forest and Clarion (commonly called the Big Level), the Kane, Wilcox, Ridgway and St. Mary's, the Kane & Campbell's Mill, and the Kane & Lafayette are State roads which remain as monuments to his local patriotism, legislative influence and engineering skill. The routes of the Philadelphia & Erie Railroad, the Pittsburgh & Western, the Ridgway & Clearfield and the New York, Lake Erie & Western Coal Railroads, through these counties, were designated by him, and he was the most influential man in promoting the construction of those railroads. At the time of his death he was president of the New York, Lake Erie & Western Coal Railroad, which had just completed its famous Kinzua viaduct. Politically Gen. Kane was first a war Democrat, and subsequently a Stalwart or Grant Republican. In 1872, however, he joined the Greeley liberal revolt against corruption, after warning Gen. Grant of his intention in an interview which only cemented the strong personal friendship which subsisted between them until his death. In 1880 he represented his congressional district at the Chicago Republican Convention, and was prominent among the "306" or "Old Guard." The bronze medal commemorating the fact is cherished by his children. Woman suffrage and the Higher Education of women were essentials of his political doctrine, and his wife and daughter graduated from the Woman's Medical College of Philadelphia. His religious affiliations and tenets were strongly Presbyterian, and the First Presbyterian Church of Kane, a picturesque and costly building, was constructed for his sake by his aunt, Mrs. Ann Gray Thomas. Complying with his dying request, his body was interred in front of this church, where a simple granite slab covers the grave. Gen. Kane died in Philadelphia, Decembi r 26, 1883. His wife and children all survive. Harriet Amelia, Evan O'Neill and Thomas Leiper are physicians, and Elisha Kent is a civil engineer by profession. All are members of the Presbyterian Church, and of the Pro hibition party. They reside at Kane, and endeavor to carry out their father's projects and principles.

J. F. KELLY, proprietor of livery, Kane, is a native of Pennsylvania, born in Buckingham township, Wayne county, in 1856, a son of John Kelly. He remained with his parents until 1872, when he entered the employ of the Delaware & Hudson Canal Company, and later was employed on the Hudson river. He afterward returned to his native town, and still later located at Warren, Penn., where he was engaged in the lumber trade. In 1888 he bought a residence in Kane, and in April, 1889, purchased the livery stable of L. Davis & Co., and now has the only first-class livery in the borough. He has a good stock of horses, carriages, buggies, etc., and is prepared to furnish any kind of outfit desired by traveling men, tourists, or pleasure seekers, at reasonable rates. Mr. Kelly was married, in 1878, in his native county to Ellen McDermott, who has borne him four children: Frederick, Louie Benediet, William and Edmund. The family residence is on Dawson street, in the borough of Kane.

THOMAS KEELOR, lumber merchant, Wetmore, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1832. He was reared and educated in his native city, remaining there until thirty years of age. In 1862 he came to Pennsylvania, located on Oil Creek, and became engaged in the oil trade. In 1864 he made large purchases of timber land near Wetmore, McKean county, and erected a steam saw-mill, and dwelling-houses for his employes. He has been successful in this business, and now has another mill on the Tionesta. His mills are connected by a steel-track road, stocked with his own cars. By perseverance and indomitable will, Mr. Keelor has made from the heart of the forest the thriving town of Wetmore, which is now one of the pleasant towns of the county. He has made all the improvements, even to the cutting of the roads. He has 100 men in his employ, and both the mills have a capacity of turning out 100,000 feet of lumber daily. Mr. Keelor is one of the able men of the county, and one of the representative lumbermen. In addition to his large lumber interests he is engaged in the mercantile business, and also is farming to a large extent, owning considerable available farming land, and in all his varied interests he ranks among the foremost men in the county. Four of his sons are employed as heads of as many departments in their father's business. Mr. Keelor is descended from an old American family, his paternal grandfather having served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war. This patriot moved from Camden, N. J., in 1812, to Hamilton county, Ohio, which was then a dense wilderness, but is now the most populous county in the State.

O. G. KELTS, jeweler, Kane, was born in Ridgway, Elk Co., Penn., in 1860, a son of O. P. and Ardissa (Wilcox) Kelts, natives of Potter county, where they were married. They moved to Ridgway and thence to Horton, and from there to Erie city, where the father died; the mother now lives at New Castle. They had two children: Orrin C. and O. G. After the death of his father O. G. Kelts lived with his grandmother several years, and then with C. Holes, at Ridgway, of whom he learned the jeweler's trade. In 1882 he came to Kane, where he began work at his trade, but now keeps a store, supplied with a good stock of watches, jewelry, etc., in addition to which he is a dealer in general merchandise. During Cleveland's administration Mr. Kelts was appointed postmaster at Kane. He is a member of Kane Lodge, No. 566, F. & A. M. Mr. Kelts was married, Feb. 2, 1882, to Ella Wicks, and they have one child, Clyde.

C. H. KEMP, proprietor of the " Thompson House," Kane. This house, which was designed as a summer resort, is delightfully located in the mountainous regions of Northern Pennsylvania, and is accessible by the Philadelphia & Erie and the Pittsburgh & Western division of the Pennsylvania Railroad. It is situated at an altitude of nearly 2,100 feet above sea level, and on the most elevated point of that region. Pure air and water are here afforded, making it a healthful resort during the heat of the summer months. Good fishing for lovers of the piscatorial sport, and romantic drives also commend the place to those in search of amusement in that line. With cuisine department unsurpassed, and a thriving borough near by of several thousand population, with none of the objectionable features found at many of the watering places, it is eminently designed as a home for those seeking rest and recreation. Mr. Kemp was reared on a farm, and at the beginning of the war of the Rebellion he enlisted in Company H, Third West Virginia Infantry, and was afterward placed on detached duty in the quartermaster's department. He was offered promotion, but declined. After the war he returned to Winchester, and until 1867 was in mercantile business. From 1867 to 1874 he was manager of Bolton's Hotel, at Harrisburg. In the summer of 1875 he was at Cape May, and in 1876 was manager of the ''Washington House," Philadelphia. He came to Kane in 1877, and took charge of the "Thompson House." Mr. Kemp is an enterprising, genial gentleman, eminently fitted for the business in which he is engaged.

O. B. LAY, proprietor of the Cummings Lumber Company, Kane, is the third son of George G. (now deceased) and Emma (Ogden) Lay, and was born in Marshall, Mich.,-January 12, 1849. The mother was a daughter of Jonathan Ogden, one of the early settlers of Binghamton, Broome Co., N. Y., then known as Chenango Point. In March, 1869, at the age of twenty years, the subject of our sketch came to Pennsylvania, and was first employed by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company as assistant agent at Cameron station, where he remained two years; was then promoted to the position of agent for the same company at Daguscahonda station. Here he remained nearly two years, when he was again promoted, being given charge of the Kane station, at which borough he has since resided. He served the Pennsylvania Railroad Company at Kane, nine years, ending May 1, 1882, when he resigned his position to en gage in other business. Mr. Lay established and edited the first newspaper (The Kane Weekly Blade) published in Kane. It was established in l 879. and suspended in 1883 on account of the office being destroyed by fire. From February, 1882, to March, 1889, Mr. Lay was actively engaged in mercantile business in Kane, but disposed of same in order to give his entire attention to his lumber business, in which he had embarked in the fall of 1885. He is the sole owner of the Cummings Lumber Company, and his mill has a daily capacity of 25,000 feet of lumber. Mr. Lay was married in January, 1875, to Blanche E., daughter of D. T. Hall, of Kane, and they have two children: Flora A. and Oakey H. Mr. Lay is a member of Kane Lodge, No. 566, F. & A. M., the Royal Arcanum and the Sons of Temperance. Politically he is a third-party Prohibitionist, believing that prohibition, with a party behind it. pledged to its enforcement, is the only effectual method of dealing with the liquor traffic. He and his family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

JOHN D. LEONARD (deceased), born in Springfield, Bradford Co., Penn., February 3, 1816, died July 14, 1888. He was one of the first settlers of Kane, and, with the exception of 'Squire Hall, was, at the time of his death, the oldest citizen of the borough. He was one of the pioneer merchants, and for twenty-one years was postmaster, holding the position until February 22, 1886. Mr. Leonard retired from active business life some time before his death. He married Susan M. Smith, who survives him, and is one of the re spected citizens of Kane. Mrs. Leonard is the daughter of Nicholas B. Smith, and was born in Alba, Bradford Co., Penn. When she was eight years of age her mother died, and her father afterward moved to Columbia township, same county, where he passed the last years of his life. His family consisted of sis children: Perussa, Lydia, Huldah, Edward C., Susan M. and Mary A.

B. F. McCONNELL, merchant, Kane, was borninNewry, Blair Co., Penn.. in 1864, and was reared and educated at Renovo, whither his parents, Henry and Mary Jane McConnell, moved in his childhood. Later they came to Kane, and here, in 1884, he engaged in the grocery business, becoming a member of the firm of B. F. McConnell & Co. This was one of the enterprising firms of the borough, and had a good trade, but Mr. McConnell sold out his interest in the firm, and, August 15, 1889, with a partner, went into the dry goods trade, the business being carried on in the name of B. F. McConnell, Mr. Mc Connell is a member of Kane Lodge, No. 412, I. 0. O. F. In politics he affiliates with the Democratic party.

JAMES McDADE, Kane, was born in Cambria county, Penn., in 1844, a son of Henry McDade. He remained at home until eighteen years of age, and during the war of the Rebellion (in 1862) was employed with a construction corps in the building of bridges in Tennessee, Alabama and Georgia. At the close of the war he returned to Cambria county, and soon after entered the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company for eight months, being conductor of the yard engine at Williamsport. He was then transferred to Renovo, where he was yard dispatcher, five years, and upon the extension of the line was again transferred, this time to Kane, where he was yard dispatcher, also five years. In 1871 he left the railroad employ, and is now engaged in more industrial enterprises than any other one citizen in his community. On leaving the railroad he embarked in the lumber trade, and later carried on a livery stable. He was also for some time connected with the mercantile interests of the town, and is now senior member of the banking firm of McDade, Davis & Co. He is president of the Citizens' Gas Light & Fuel Company, and, with J. T. Griffith, has a lamp-black factory, which has a daily capacity of twenty barrels. The development of the Kane oil fields is due chiefly to his enterprise, as when the territory was abandoned by the oil men, in order to thoroughly test the field, he gave 300 acres free of royalty to Craig & Cap poau, who drilled on the land and found the well that opened up the field. He is a large land owner, and has since the opening of the oil fields sold 000 acres for $76,000. He is a practical farmer, and some of his land is under cultivation. Mr. McDade was married in Renovo, in 1873, to Sarah Swedy, and they have five children: William Alden, Elizabeth Mabel, James Raymond. Henry Calvin and Edward. Mr. McDade is a Democrat in politics, and in 1888 was the candidate of his party for member of the legislature.

J. D. MAGOWAN, druggist, Kane, was born in County Down, Ireland, in 1852, son of David and Jane Magowan, of Scotch-Irish parentage. He was reared and educated in his native country, and in 1872 came to America and located at Kane, Penn., where he worked at the carpenter's trade until 1877. He was in the employ of O. D. Coleman until 1881, and then for four years was employed by Joshua Davis. In 1885 he started in business for himself, opening a drug store, and now has a good trade. Mr. Magowan was married, in 1886, to Bella C. Lafferty, daughter of Robert Lafferty, one of the pioneers of Kane, but now deceased, and they have two children—one son and one daughter. Mr. Magowan is a member of Kane Lodge, No. 412, I. O. O. F. Politically he is a Prohibitionist. Mr. and Mrs. Magowan are members of the Presbyterian Church.

ADA C. MALONE, editress and manager of the Leader, of Kane, was born February 4, 1867, at Ridgway, Elk Co., Penn., in the public schools of which place she received her primary education. On June 3, 1882, she graduated from the high school, and she then attended the State Normal School at Lock Haven, one term. On June 2, 1884, Miss Malone entered the office of the Ridgway Advocate, as an apprentice, being afterward promoted to bookkeeper and proof-reader. In the spring of 1886, she came to Kane to accept a position on the Leader, but left the town June 1, 1887. In August of that year, she accepted a position as compositor in the office of the Daily Mirror, published at Warren, Penn., where she remained one year and a half, and April 18, 1880, she was appointed to hor present position in Kane.

FRANK W. MEESE, proprietor of the St. Elmo Hotel, Kane, was born in Somerset county, Penn,, in 1835. His father, Elijah Meese, of English descent, was born in Somerset. Penn.. April 25, 1808, and died in New Philadelphia, Ohio, March 29, 1870, weighing, at the time of his death, 427

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