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nient. Many men may have complained that he was a hard man to deal with, yet the assertion can be ventured, without fear of successful contradiction, that no man whom he believed to be dealing honestly and fairly by him was ever oppressed or wronged by his authority, and that no marj in McKean county was found to be more sympathetic and tender hearted when approached in a proper manner. He was a business man in every sense. He expected men to live up to their obligations. He took all manner of chances, and gave accommodation and time to men whom no other merchants would trust, in hundreds of cases. The loss that McKean county, and the borough of Smethport especially, sustains in the death of A. N. Taylor can not at once be estimated. When a town loses one of its ablest, most energetic, successful and wealthiest business men, the loss is not fully repaired in years. At the time of his fatal fall he had in contemplation the use of a portion of his ample means for the building up and improvement of the borough, and had already taken energetic steps in that direction. He left a widow and three children, one son and two daughters; and though well provided for as to the things of this world, nothing can fully compensate the loss of a kind and wisely indulgent father and husband. Mr. Taylor, always a Republican in politics from the organization of the party, was once elected associate judge by an overwhelming majority. During the days of the Civil war he had the fullest faith in the ultimate success of the Union arms, and he had lost since that time none of his love for the principles of his party or his zeal for their success.

EDWARD H. TAYLOR, merchant, Smethport, is a son of John B. and Elizabeth (Holcomb) Taylor, and was born in Smethport, McKean Co., Penn., in 1858. His father was a native of Burlington, Otsego Co., N. Y., and his mother of Granby, Conn. They each came to Smethport with their parents, and were here married. They had a family of twelve children, seven of whom are living: James T., John L., Myrtilla E., Mary E., Maria A., Edward H. and Ezra V. Edward H. Taylor was reared and received his education at Smethport, and at Randolph, N. Y. After the completion of his studies he engaged in jobbing, and eventually became one of the merchants of Smethport, dealing in boots, shoes and groceries. He married, in 1886, Laura M., daughter of H. M. Reynolds, of Mansfield, Tioga Co., Penn., and they have two sons, John H. and George R. (latter born April 4, 1889). James Taylor, grandfather of Edward H., was among the pioneers of the county, locating here in 1824, when the country was a wilderness. Mr. E. H. Taylor is a Republican in his political views.

JAMES M. TRACY, postmaster and merchant, East Smethport, was born in Philadelphia, Penn., in April, 1844, a son of Edward and Bridget (Riley) Tracy, natives of County Cavan, Ireland. They came to Philadelphia from their native land, but, thinking a newer country better adapted to their needs, came to Keating township, McKean county, in 1842, and purchased a tract of land for a farm. They were the parents of seven children, James M. being the third son, who during his youth attended the common schools and worked upon the farm. After his marriage, Mr. Tracy remained upon the farm with his parents until September, 1876, when he came to East Smethport, where he erected the building he now occupies, and engaged in mercantile business. Mr. Tracy married in June, 1863, Miss Ann, daughter of Bernard and Ann (Gallagher) Burns, natives of Ireland, who came to Union City, Erie Co., Penn., in 1845. Five children have blessed this union, viz.: Thomas A., Mary E., Lillie E., Annie E. and Paul E. In July, 1885, Mr. Tracy was appointed postmaster at East Smethport, which office he still retains. In politics Mr. Tracy is a Democrat, and he and his family belong to the Catholic Church.

F. E. TULL, merchant, Smethport, was born in Bath, N. Y., August 25, 1846, the only son of three children born to R. D. and Harriet (Colegrove) Toll, natives of New York State, who came to Ceres township, McKean Co., Penn., in 1860. He was educated at Portville, N. Y., and his boyhood days were spent with his parents upon the home farm. He married, in February, 1873, Miss Almira, daughter of Luther and Sophia (Maxon) Eastman, of Portville, N. Y., and they are the parents of two children, Herman and Ethel, both of whom reside at home. Mr. Tull, in 1875, engaged in mercantile businessand became postmaster at Myrtle, Penn., which he continued until June, 1887, when he sold his business out to J. C. Burt, and went to Ceres, Penn., engaging as a drug clerk. From there he moved to Eldred, Penn.. where he embarked in the clothing trade. Here he remained until March, 1889, when he came to Smethport and engaged in his present business. Mr. Tull served for six years as justice of the peace in Ceres township, and has held various township offices. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. of Eldred, Penn., and of the K. J. T. M. In politics he is a Republican.

MANVILLE TUTTLE, farmer and lumberman, P. O. Coryville, a son of Daniel and Lucina Tuttle, was born in Freetown, Cortland Co., N. Y., in 1815, and with his father removed to Wellsville, N. Y., in 1837, where the father died in 1842, the mother having died in Freetown, N. Y., in 1828. Manville Tuttle came to Pennsylvania about 1845, locating at Turtle Point, McKean connty; eventually he purchased the farm he now owns in Keating township, McKean county, where he is interested in business as a lumberman and farmer. In 1838 he married Cordelia Kent, daughter of R. C. and Pru dence Kent, and they have had a family of seven children, of whom but two are living: Prudence L., now Mrs. Orson Cory, and F. S., on a farm opposite the old homestead. Mr. Tuttle is a Republican in politics, and is a prominent man in this portion of the county.

JOHN K. WILLIAMS, born August 22, 1822, died April 4, 1880, was the first white child born in Smethport. He read law under W. A. Williams, and was admitted to the bar of his native county, June 6, 1846. For two years before his admission he was Prothonotary Hamlin's deputy. In the summer of 1846, he moved to Wisconsin, where he died. He was named by John Keating after himself, and received from the great land owner a silver dollar, which his mother invested in the purchase of a sheep, and this investment yielded $200 by 1846, which sum was forwarded to Wisconsin.

G. W. WILLIAMS, merchant, Smethport, was born in Canton. St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., August 7,1842, and began his studies there, completing them in Franklin county. He commenced business life as a grocer, in Burlington, Vt., and afterward removed to Franklin county, where he went into the cattle business, from that to mercantile business, remaining until 1877, when he went to Bradford, Penn., and engaged in the livery business, and later removed to Red Rock, eventually locating in Smethport, where he is now dealing in groceries and meats. Mr. Williams married Candace C. Lyon, in 1866, and they have two sons: Ezra L. and Joseph G. He is a member of the Select Knights of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and North Star Lodge, F. & A. M., of New York. Politically he is a Republican.

CLARK WILSON, the present editor and publisher of the McKean Democrat, is now a few months over sixty-two years of age, and has perhaps devoted as much time as editor and publisher as any man living in the State. He is of Irish descent, his parents having emigrated at an early day from a part of Ireland, adjacent to Scotland, his father leaving Ireland when about nineteen years old, and his mother at the age of nine. They were strict Presbyterians during all their lives and raised their family in the same faith. Clark Wilson went as an apprentice to the printing business when twelve years of age, and served no less than seven years before he graduated as a journeyman printer. A few years after finishing his trade, he commenced business as one of the editors and publishers of the Jeffersonian, published at Brookville, Jefferson Co., Penn. He afterward established and published for some time the Mahoning Register, at Punxsutawney, same county, then became one of the editors and proprietors of the Clearfield Republican, a radical Democratic sheet published in the town of Clearfield, Penn. Next Mr. Wilson appears as editor, publisher and proprietor of the Democratic Messenger, a paper which he established and published for over five years, in the town of Indiana, Indiana Co., Penn. He then served five years as editor of the Union Herald, a Democratic paper published in Butler, Butler Co., Penn., after which he was for a time editor and publisher of the Democrat and Sentinel, at Ebensburg, Cambria Co., Penn. He next established and for ten years edited and published, as an independent paper, the Oilman's Journal, at Parker's Landing, Armstrong Co., Penn. Last, and perhaps least, the past ten or eleven years of Mr. Wilson's life have been spent in publishing the McKean Democrat, established by him at Smethport, McKean Co., Penn., May 20, 1879. He claims to have labored under many disadvantages during his career as a journalist here, and if favored with life and health will probably make a better showing hereafter. Mr. Wilson was married when about twenty-three years of age, to Miss Cornelia A. Magee, of Clearfield, Clearfield Co., Penn., and five children were born to them, four of whom are still living, one son and three daughters. The son, like his father, took to the printing business, and has been for some years engaged as editor and publisher of the Public Spirit, an independent Democratic paper, published in the town of Clearfield, Penn. In 1860 the subject of this notice was appointed deputy marshal, and took the census of the northern part, about one-half, of Indiana county. In 1888 he was appointed by President Cleveland postmaster at Smethport, Penn., and on June 11, same year, he took charge of the office and continued, assisted by two of his daughters, to discharge the duties pertaining thereto up to April, 1890. His successor, E. M. Kerns, was appointed in July, 1889.

CHARLES C. WRIGHT, lumberman, P. O. Coleville, is a son of Rensselaer and Sally (Moore) Wright, and was born at Smethport, McKean Co., Penn., in 1829. His father came from Delaware county, N. Y., and located at Eldred, Penn., where he was engaged in farming; was also the proprietor of a hotel and quite extensively engaged in the lumber business. His family consisted of eleven children, six of whom are living, viz.: Charles C., James, Martha, Sally, Maria and Junius. Mr. Rensselaer Wright was one of the first commissioners of McKean county, and in 1829 was elected sheriff of the county. During his official career he went to Philadelphia on horseback, and returning brought with him funds necessary for the erection of the first court-house of McKean county. He was emphatically a self-made man, and held a deservedly high place among the representative men of his day. He died in 1884 and his wife in 1881. Charles C. Wright was reared and educated in Eldred, and on starting in life for himself located on Cole creek, in Keating township, on the place he still owns, where he erected a steam saw-mill, and is now known as one of the extensive lumbermen of McKean county. Mr. Wright married Jerusha Dennis, and to them were born six children: Victor C., J. B., William, Delbert, Lillie J. and Milton. Mrs. Wright died in 1877, and in 1879 Mr. Wright married Miss Madison. Mr. Wright takes an active interest in the questions of the day, and is a supporter of the principles of the Republican party, of which he is a prominent member.

B. F. WRIGHT, proprietor of Wright's Hotel, Smethport, was born in Madison county, N. Y. , in 1835. He removed to Oneida county, thence to Lima, Livingston Co., N. Y., and completed his education at the seminary there, after which he visited the West. In 1859 he removed to Smethport, and at the beginning of the war enlisted in Company C, First P. R. V. C. He was wounded at the battle of South Mountain, Md., and received a second wound at Spottsylvania Court House in 1864. On July 3, 1865, he was mustered out of the service, and returning to Smethport accepted a position with the Lafayette Coal Company at Lafayette. In the fall of 1866 he was elected sheriff of McKean county, serving one term of three years. In 1875 he built the hotel named after himself, becoming its proprietor, and being one of the representative men of the county, social and courteous with his guests, and having a large and favorable acquaintance, Wright's Hotel is well and favorably known. He is a member of McKean Lodge, F. & A. M., No. 388, of Lodge No. 183, A. O. U. W., and of the G. A. R. He is a worker in the Republican party. In 1859 he married Miss Catharine L., daughter of O. L. Bennett, and they have five children: F. O. (an only son), Ella, Lena, and Lucy and Elida (twins).

HENRY WRIGHT, farmer, P. O. Smethport, son of Pardon and Clarissa Wright, was born in Cattaraugus county, N. Y.. in 1849. With his parents he removed to Keating township, McKean Co., Penn., where they engaged in farming. They had a family of four children, viz.: Helen A., June, Mandarin and Henry. Pardon Wright died October 23, 1885, and his widow has her home with her son, Henry. Henry Wright, in 1875, married Mary, daughter of Charles Guenther, formerly of Smethport, and they are the parents of four children: Mollie G.. William H., W. Leo and Sarah Alice. Mr Wright is a supporter of the principles of the Republican party, and was elected auditor in 1889. He owns and operates a farm on Marvin creek, in Keating township. Mrs. Mary Wright, for several years before her marriage, was a school-teacher of some note.

D. C. YOUNG, merchant, Smethport, son of Arthur and Laurinda (Stull) Young, was born May 5, 1843, at Farmers Valley, McKean Co., Penn. His parents were among the early settlers of that county, and his paternal greatgrandfather, William Young, was a native of Providence, R. I., where he married and became the father of a numerous family of children, and where he lived and died. Stephen, a son of William Young, removed to Norwich, Chenango Co., N. Y., when that county was comparatively in a state of nature, and then married Betsy Green, and reared a family of ten children. Removing with his family to Norwich township, McKean Co., Penn., he purchased lands and followed farming until his decease in 1841, Betsy, his widow, surviving him until 1858. Their children were as follows: Clinton, Edward, Anna, Hannah, Arthur, Betsy, Harriet, Stephen, Malvina and William. The parents of Lucinda Stull, mother of D. C. Young, were also among the pioneers of McKean county, her father having located in Eldred township in 1811. Arthur, the third son of Stephen and Betsy Young, was born at Norwich, Chenango Co., N. Y., in 1813, and with his parents removed to McKean county, Norwich township, settling in 1821. When a boy of fourteen years of age he engaged in trapping for mink and otter, and after making a sale of his furs he found himself in possession of a sufficient sum of money to enable him to purchase a gun. Later he became one of the noted hunters of his day, and had the reputation of having killed a greater number of deer, bears, panthers and wildcats, than any other individual in the county. This gun, his first purchase, which he always used in his expeditions in search of game, he beduring all their lives and raised their family in the same faith. Clark Wilson went as an apprentice to the printing business when twelve years of age, and served no less than seven years before he graduated as a journeyman printer. A few years after finishing his trade, he commenced business as one of the editors and publishers of the Jeffersonian, published at Brookville, Jefferson Co., Penn. He afterward established and published for some time the Mahoning Register, at Punxsutawney, same county, then became one of the editors and proprietors of the Clearfield Republican, a radical Democratic sheet published in the town of Clearfield, Penn. Next Mr. Wilson appears as editor, publisher and proprietor of the Democratic Messenger, a paper which he established and published for over five years, in the town of Indiana, Indiana Co., Penn. He then served five years as editor of the Union Herald, a Democratic paper published in Butler, Butler Co., Penn., after which he was for a time editor and publisher of the Democrat and Sentinel, at Ebensburg, Cambria Co., Penn. He next established and for ten years edited and published, as an independent paper, the Oilman's Journal, at Parker's Landing, Armstrong Co., Penn. Last, and perhaps least, the past ten or eleven years of Mr. Wilson's life have been spent in publishing the McKean Democrat, established by him at Smethport, McKean Co., Penn., May 20, 1879. He claims to have labored under many disadvantages during his career as a journalist here, and if favored with life and health will probably make a better showing hereafter. Mr. Wilson was married when about twenty-three years of age, to Miss Cornelia A. Magee, of Clearfield, Clearfield Co., Penn., and five children were born to them, four of whom are still living, one son and three daughters. The son, like his father, took to the printing business, and has been for some years engaged as editor and publisher of the Public Spirit, an independent Democratic paper, published in the town of Clearfield, Penn. In 1860 the subject of this notice was appointed deputy marshal, and took the census of the northern part, about one-half, of Indiana county. In 1888 he was appointed by President Cleveland postmaster at Smethport, Penn.. and on June 11, same year, he took charge of the office and continued, assisted by two of his daughters, to discharge the duties pertaining thereto up to April, 1890. His successor, E. M. Kerns, was appointed in July, 1889.

CHARLES C. WRIGHT, lumberman, P. O. Coleville, is a son of Rensselaer and Sally (Moore) Wright, and was born at Smethport, McKean Co., Penn., in 1829. His father came from Delaware county, N. Y., and located at Eldred, Peun., where he was engaged in farming; was also the proprietor of a hotel and quite extensively engaged in the lumber business. His family consisted of eleven children, six of whom are living, viz.: Charles C., James, Martha, Sally, Maria and Junius. Mr. Rensselaer Wright was one of the first commissioners of McKean county, and in 1829 was elected sheriff of the county. During his official career he went to Philadelphia on horseback, and returning brought with him funds necessary for the erection of the first court house of McKean county. He was emphatically a self-made man, and held a deservedly high place among the representative men of his day. He died in 1884 and his wife in 1881. Charles C. Wright was reared and educated in Eldred, and on starting in life for himself located on Cole creek, in Keating township, on the place he still owns, where he erected a steam saw-mill, and is now known as one of the extensive lumbermen of McKean county. Mr. Wright married Jerusha Dennis, and to them were born six children: Victor C., J. B., William, Delbert, Lillie J. and Milton. Mrs. Wright died in 1877, and in 1879 Mr. Wright married Miss Madison. Mr. Wright takes an active interest in the questions of the day, and is a supporter of the principles of the Republican party, of which he is a prominent member.

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