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The Selborne rivulet becomes of some breadth at Oakhanger, and, in very wet seasons, swells to a large flood. There is a bridge over the stream at this hamlet of considerable antiquity and peculiar shape, known by the name of Tunbridge : it consists of one single blunt gothic arch, so high and sharp as to render the passage not very convenient or safe. Here was also, we find, a bridge in very early times; for Jacobus de Hochangre, the first benefactor to the Priory of Selborne, held his estate at Hochangre by the service of providing the king one footsoldier for forty days, and by building this bridge. “ Jacobus de Hochangre tenet Hochangre in com. Southampton per Serjantiam, inveniendi unum valectum in exercitu Domini regis [scil. Henrici III.] per 40 dies; et ad faciendum pontem de Hochangre: et valet per ann. C. s.”—Blount's Ancient Tenures, p. 84.

A dove-house was a constant appendage to a manerial dwelling: of this convenience more will be said hereafter.

A corn-mill was also esteemed a necessary appendage of every manor; and therefore was to be expected of course at the Priory of Selborne.

The prior had secta molendini, or ad molendinum :2 a power of compelling his vassals to bring their corn to be ground at his mill, according to old custom. He had also, according to bishop Tanner, secta molendini de Strete : but the purport of Strete, we must confess, we do not understand. Strete, in old English, signifies a road or highway, as Watling Strete, etc. therefore the prior might have some mill on a high road. The Priory had only one mill originally at Selborne ; but, by grants of lands, it came possessed of one at Durton, and one at Oakhanger, and probably some on its other several manors.3 The

1 Sargentia, a sort of tenure of doing something for the king.

2 “Servitium, quo feudatorii grana sua ad Domini molendinum, ibi molenda perferre, ex consuetudine, astringuntur.”

3 Thomas Knowles, president, etc. ann. Hen. 8vi. xxiii.' [viz. 1532] demised to J. Whitelie their mills, etc. for twenty years. Rent xxiiis. id.-Accepted Frewen, president, etc. ann. Caroli xv. (viz. 1640] demised to Jo. Hook and Elizabeth, his wife, the said mills. Rent as above.

mill at the Priory was in use within the memory of man, and the ruins of the mill-house were standing within these thirty years: the pond and dam, and miller's dwelling, still remain. As the stream was apt to fail in very dry summers, the tenants found their situation very distressing, for want of water, and so were forced to abandon the spot. This inconvenience was probably never felt in old times, when the whole district was nothing but woodlands: and yet several centuries ago there seem to have been two or three mills between Well-head and the Priory. For the reason of this assertion, see Letter XXIX. to Mr. Barrington.

Occasional mention has been made of the many privileges and immunities enjoyed by the convent and its priors; but a more particular state seems to be necessary. The author therefore thinks this the proper place, before he concludes these antiquities, to introduce all that has been collected by the judicious bishop Tanner, respecting the Priory and its advantages, in his Notitia Monastica, a book now seldom seen, on account of the extravagance of its price; and being but in few hands cannot be easily consulted." He also adds a few of its many privileges from other authorities:–the account is as follows. Tanner, page 166.

SELEBURNE

A priory of black canons, founded by the oftenmentioned Peter de Rupibus, bishop of Winchester, A.D. 1233, and dedicated to the blessed Virgin Mary: but was suppressed—and granted to William Wainfleet, bishop of Winchester, who made it part of the endowment of St. Mary Magdalene College in Oxford. The bishops of Winchester were patrons of it. [Pat. 17. Edw. II.] Vide in Mon. Angl. tom. II. p. 343. “Cartam fundationis ex ipso autographo in archivis Coll. Magd. Oxön. ubi etiam conservata sunt registra, cartae, rentalia et alia munimenta ad hunc prioratum spectantia. “ Extracta quaedam e registro MSS. in Bibl. Bodl. Dodsworth, vol. 89. f. 14o.” “ Cart. antiq. N. N. n. 33. P. P. n. 48. et 7 1. Q. Q. n. 4o. plac. coram justit. itin. [Southampton] 2o Hen. rot. 25. De eccl. de Basing, & Basingstoke. Plac. de juratis apud Winton. 4o Hen. III. rot.—Prosecta molendini de Strete. Cart. 54. Hen. III. m. 3. [De mercatu, & feria apud Seleborne, a mistake.] Pat. 9. Edw. I. m.—Pat. 3o. Edw. I. m.—Pat. 33. Edw. I. p. I. m.—Pat. 35. Edw. I. m.—Pat. I. Edw. II. p. I. m. 9. Pat. 5. Edw. II. p. I. m. 21. De terris in Achanger. Pat. 6. Edw. II. p. 1. m. 7. de eisdem. Brev. in Scacc. 6. Edw. II. Pasch. rot. 8. Pat. I 7. Edw. II. p. I. m.—Cart. Io. Edw. III. n. 24. Quod terrae suae in Seleburne, Achangre, Norton, Basings, Basingstoke, and Nately, sint de afforestatae, and pro aliis libertatibus. Pat. 12. Edw. III. p. 3. m. 3.—Pat. 13. Edw. III. p. I. m.—Cart. 18. Edw. III. n. 24.'' “ N. N. 33. Rex concessit quod prior, et canonici de Seleburn habeant per terras suas de Seleburne, Achangre, Norton, Brompden, Basinges, Basingstoke, & Nately, diversas libertates. ** P. P. 48. Quod prior de Seleburne, habeat terras suas quietas de vasto, et regardo."—Extracts from Ayloffe's Calendars of Ancient Charters. “ Placita de juratis & assis coram Salom de Roff, & sociis suis justic. itiner. apud Wynton in comitatu Sutht.—anno regni R. Edvardi filii reg. Henr. octavo.—Et POr de Seleborn ht in Selebr. fure. thurset. pillory, emendasse panis, & suis.” [cerevisiae.]—Chapter-house, Westminster. “ Placita Foreste apud Wyntón in com. Sutham.—Anno reg. Edwardi octavo coram Rog. de Clifford.—&c. Justic. ad eadem placita audienda et tminand. assigtis. “ Carta Pror de Seleburn, H. Dei gra. rex. angl. &c. Concessim. prior. Sce. Marie de Seleburn. et canonicis ibidem

1 A few days after this was written a new edition of this valuable

work was announced, in the month of April of the year 1787, as published by Mr. Nasmith.

Deo servient. — — — q ipi et oes hoies sui in pdcis terris in the undermining a portion of that fine old ruin at the north end of Basingstoke town, well known by the name of Holy Ghost Chapel. Very providentially the vast fragment, which these thoughtless little engineers endeavoured to sap, did not give way so soon as might have been expected ; but it fell the night following, and with such violence that it shook the very ground, and, awakening the inhabitants of the neighbouring cottages, made them start up in their beds as if they had felt an earthquake. The motive for this dangerous attempt does not so readily appear : perhaps the more danger the more honour thought the boys; and the notion of doing some mischief gave a zest to the enterprise. As Dryden says upon another occasion,

“It look'd so like a sin it pleas'd the more.” Had the Priory been only levelled to the surface of the ground, the discerning eye of an antiquary might have ascertained its ichnography, and some judicious hand might have developed its dimensions. But, besides other ravages, the very foundations have been torn up for the repair of the highways: so that the site of this convent is now become a rough, rugged pasture-field, full of hillocks and pits, choked with nettles, and dwarf-elder, and trampled by the feet of the ox and the heifer.

As the tenant at the Priory was lately digging among the foundations, for materials to mend the highways, his labourers discovered two large stones, with which the farmer was so pleased that he ordered them to be taken out whole. One of these proved to be a large Doric capital, worked in good taste; and the other a base of a pillar ; both formed out of the soft freestone of this district. These ornaments, from their dimensions, seem to have belonged to massive columns ; and show that the church of this convent was a large and costly edifice. They were found in the space which has always been supposed to have contained the south transept of the Priory church. Some fragments of large pilasters were also found at the same time. The diameter of the capital

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ipso autographo in archivis Coll. Magd. Oxon. ubi etiam conservata sunt registra, cartae, rentalia et alia munimenta ad hunc prioratum spectantia.

“Extracta quaedam e registro MSS. in Bibl. Bodl. Dodsworth, vol. 89. f. 140.

“ Cart. antiq. N. N. n. 33. P. P. n. 48. et 71. Q. Q. n. 40. plac. coram justit. itin. [Southampton] 20 Hen. rot. 25. De eccl. de Basing, & Basingstoke. Plac. de juratis apud Winton. 40 Hen. III. rot.-Prosecta molendini de Strete. Cart. 54. Hen. III. m. 3. [De mercatu, & feria apud Seleborne, a mistake.] Pat. 9. Edw. I. m.-Pat. 30. Edw. I. m.--Pat. 33. Edw. I. p. 1. m.—Pat. 35. Edw. I. m.—Pat. 1. Edw. II. p. 1. m. 9. Pat. 5. Edw. II. p. I. m. 21. De terris in Achanger. Pat. 6. Edw. II. p. 1. m. 7. de eisdem. Brev. in Scacc. 6. Edw. II. Pasch. rot. 8. Pat. 17. Edw. II. p. 1. m.-Cart. 10. Edw. III. n. 24. Quod terrae suae in Seleburne, Achangre, Norton, Basings, Basingstoke, and Nately, sint de afforestatae, and libertatibus. Pat. 12. Edw. III. p. 3. m. 3. -Pat. 13. Edw. III. p. 1. m.-Cart. 18. Edw. III. n. 24.

“N. N. 33. Rex concessit quod prior, et canonici de Seleburn habeant per terras suas de Seleburne, Achangre, Norton, Brompden, Basinges, Basingstoke, & Nately, diversas libertates.

“P. P. 48. Quod prior de Seleburne, habeat terras suas quietas de vasto, et regardo.”—Extracts from Ayloffe's Calendars of Ancient Charters.

“ Placita de juratis & assis coram Salom de Roff, & sociis suis justic. itiner. apud Wynton in comitatu Sutht.—anno regni R. Edvardi filii reg. Henr. octavo.—Et Por de Seleborn ht in Selebr. fure. thurset. pillory, emendasse panis, & suis.” [cerevisiae.]—Chapter-house, Westminster.

“Placita Foreste apud Wynton in com. Sutham.-Anno reg. Edwardi octavo coram Rog. de Clifford.—&c. Justic. ad eadem placita audienda et tminand. assigtis.

“ Carta Pror de Seleburn, H. Dei gra. rex, angl. &c. Concessim. prior. sce. Marie de Seleburn. et canonicis ibidem Deo servient.

q ipi et oes hoies sui in pdcis terris

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