The Works of ... Edmund Burke, Band 10

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F. & C. Rivington, 1812
 

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Seite 413 - ... when he knew any man to be good, he reposed in him an entire confidence, which prevented his prudence from degenerating into a vice. He had vices in his composition, and great ones; but they were the vices of a great mind: ambition, the malady of every extensive genius; and avarice, the madness of the wise : one chiefly actuated his youth, the other governed his age. The vices of young and light minds, the joys of wine, and the pleasures of love, never reached his aspiring nature. The general...
Seite 96 - Peerage but this — our Constitution is a prescriptive Constitution ; it is a Constitution, whose sole authority is, that it has existed time out of mind.
Seite 30 - And his lord was wroth, and delivered him to the tormentors, till he should pay all that was due unto him. So likewise shall my heavenly Father do also unto you, if ye from your hearts forgive not every one his brother their trespasses.
Seite 94 - ... they who plead an absolute right cannot be satisfied with anything short of personal representation, because all natural rights must be the rights of individuals ; as by nature there is no such thing as politic or corporate personality ; all these ideas are mere fictions of law, they are creatures of voluntary institution ; men as men are individuals, and nothing else.
Seite 107 - By it they lived, for it they were ready to die. Its defects, if it had any, were partly covered by partiality, and partly borne by prudence. Now all its excellencies are forgot, its faults are now forcibly dragged into day, exaggerated by every artifice of representation.
Seite 37 - ... who by attacking even the possibility of all revelation, arraign all the dispensations of Providence to man. These are the wicked Dissenters you ought to fear; these are the people against whom you ought to aim the shaft of the law ; these are the men, to whom, arrayed in all the terrors of government, I would say, you shall not degrade us into brutes...
Seite 97 - Because a nation is not an idea only of local extent and individual momentary aggregation, but it is an idea of continuity which extends in time as well as in numbers and in space. And this is a choice not of one day, or one set of people, not a tumultuary and giddy choice ; it is a deliberate election of...
Seite 108 - I look with filial reverence on the constitution of my country, and never will cut it in pieces, and put it into the kettle of any magician, in order to boil it, with the puddle of their compounds, into youth and vigour. On the contrary, I will drive away such pretenders ; I will nurse its venerable age, and with lenient arts extend a parent's breath.
Seite 412 - The silent inward satisfactions of domestick happiness he neither had, nor sought. He had a body suited to the character of his mind, erect, firm, large, and active ; whilst to be active was a praise; a countenance stern, and which became command. Magnificent in his living, reserved in his conversation, grave in his common deportment, but relaxing with a wise facetiousness, he knew how to relieve his mind and preserve his dignity; for he never forfeited by a personal acquaintance that esteem he had...
Seite 44 - Religion is so far, in my opinion, from being out of the province or the duty of a christian magistrate, that it is and it ought to be not only his care, but the principal thing in his care ; because it is one of the great bonds of human society ; and its object the supreme good, the ultimate end and object of man himself.

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