Memoir of the Life and Public Services of John Charles Frémont ...

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Derby & Jackson, 1856 - 480 Seiten
This book examines the life of John Charles Frémont, American explorer, politician, and soldier who, in 1856, became the first candidate of the anti-slavery Republican Party for the office of President of the United States.

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Seite 453 - That the maintenance of the principles promulgated in the Declaration of Independence and embodied in the Federal Constitution...
Seite 53 - It was a strange place, the icy rock and the highest peak of the Rocky mountains, for a lover of warm sunshine and flowers; and we pleased ourselves with the idea that he was the first of his species to cross the mountain barrier — a solitary pioneer to foretell the advance of civilization.
Seite 56 - River. Around us the whole scene had one main striking feature, which was that of terrible convulsion. Parallel to its length, the ridge was split into chasms and fissures, between which rose the thin, lofty walls, terminated with slender minarets and columns, which is correctly represented in the view from the camp on Island Lake.
Seite 452 - This Convention of Delegates, assembled in pursuance of a call addressed to the people of the United States, without regard to past political differences or divisions, who are opposed to the repeal of the Missouri Compromise, to the policy of the present Administration...
Seite 456 - ... the people of the United States, without regard to past political differences or divisions, who are opposed to the repeal of the Missouri Compromise, to the policy of the present administration, to the extension of slavery into free territory, in favor of admitting Kansas as a free State, of restoring the action of the Federal Government to the principles of Washington and Jefferson...
Seite 53 - I sprang upon the summit, and another step would have precipitated me into an immense snow field five hundred feet below. To the edge of this field was a sheer icy precipice ; and then, with a gradual fall, the field sloped off for about a mile, until it struck the foot of another lower ridge.
Seite 453 - Federal government were to secure these rights to all persons within its exclusive jurisdiction ; that as our Republican fathers when they had abolished slavery in all our national territory, ordained that no person should be deprived of life, liberty or property, without due process of law...
Seite 453 - ... it becomes our duty, by legislation, whenever such legislation is necessary, to maintain this provision of the Constitution against all attempts to violate it; and we deny the authority of Congress, of a territorial legislature, or of any individuals, to give legal existence to slavery in any territory of the United States.
Seite 51 - There at last it rose by our sides, a nearly perpendicular wall of granite, terminating 2,000 to 3,000 feet above our heads in a serrated line of broken, jagged cones. We rode on until we came almost immediately below the main peak, which I denominated the Snow Peak, as it exhibited more snow to the eye than any of the neighboring summits.
Seite 455 - That we invite the affiliation and co-operation of the men of all parties, however differing from us in other respects, in support of the principles herein declared ; and believing that the spirit of our institutions, as well as the Constitution of our country, guarantees liberty of conscience and equality of rights among citizens, we oppose all legislation impairing their security.

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