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Art come, dear youth ? Two days and nights away!
For love who passion, wax old—in a day.
As much as apples sweet the damson crude
Excel; the bloomy spring the winter rude;
In fleece the sheep her lamb; the maid in sweetness
The thrice-wed dame; the fawn the calf in fleetness;
The nightingale in song all feathered kind —
So much thy longed-for presence cheers my mind.
To thee I hasten, as to shady beech
The traveller, when from the heaven's reach
The sun fierce blazes. May our love be strong,
To all hereafter times the theme of song!
“ Two men each other loved to that degree,
That either friend did in the other see

A dearer than himself. They lived of old,
Both golden natures in an age of gold.”

O father Zeus ! ageless Immortals all ! Two hundred ages hence may one recall, Down-coming to the irremeable river, This to my mind, and this good news deliver : “ E'en now from east to west, from north to south, Your mutual friendship lives in every mouth.” This, as they please, the Olympians will decide : Of thee, by blooming virtue beautified, My glowing song shall only truth disclose ; With falsehood's pustules I'll not shame my nose. If thou dost sometime grieve me, sweet the pleasure Of reconcilement, joy in double measure To find thou never didst intend the pain, And feel myself from all doubt free again.

And, ye Megarians, at Nisæa dwelling, Expert at rowing, mariners excelling, Be happy ever! for with honours due Th’ Athenian Diocles, to friendship true, Ye celebrate. With the first blush of spring The youth surround his tomb: there who shall bring

The sweetest kiss, whose lip is purest found,
Back to his mother goes with garlands crowned.
Nice touch the arbiter must have, indeed,
And must, methinks, the blue-eyed Ganymede
Invoke with many prayers—a mouth to own
True to the touch of lips, as Lydian stone
To proof of gold, —which test will instant show
The pure or base, as money-changers know.

IDYL XIII.

HYLAS.

ARGUMENT.

The poet describes the abduction of Hylas by the fountain

nymphs. The youth attended Hercules, who was one of the worthies that accompanied Jason, when he sailed in the good ship Argo in quest of the golden fleece. When the vessel arrived at the territory of the Cianians, who dwelt on the shore of the Propontis; the band of heroes went ashore, and are described as messing there in pairs. Hylas was sent to bring water from a neighbouring fountain for Hercules and his messmate Telamon ; but the nymphs of the fountain, becoming enamoured of him, drew him into it. The distraction of Her. cules at his loss is described ; and the other heroes at last sail away without him, stigmatising him as a ship-deserter.

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