Nature, Band 10

Cover
Sir Norman Lockyer
Macmillan Journals Limited, 1874
 

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Seite 238 - I presently found that, by means of this lens, air was expelled from it very readily. Having got about three or four times as much as the bulk of my materials, I admitted water to it, and found that it was not imbibed by it. But what surprised me more than I can well express was, that a candle burned in this air with a remarkably vigorous flame...
Seite 211 - THE BOYDEN PREMIUM URIAH A. BOYDEN, ESQ., of Boston, Mass., has deposited with THE FRANKLIN INSTITUTE the sum of one thousand dollars, to be awarded as a premium to "Any resident of North America who shall determine by experiment whether all rays of light,* and other physical rays, are or are not transmitted with the same velocity.
Seite 317 - The cold colossal, adamantine spirit, standing erect and clear, like a Cato Major among degenerate men: fit to have been the teacher of the Stoa, and to have discoursed of Beauty and Virtue in the groves of Academe!
Seite 313 - acts by the preservation and accumulation of small inherited modifications, each profitable to the preserved being." With this idea he interpenetrates and leavens the vast store of facts that he and others have collected. We cannot, without shutting our eyes through fear or prejudice, fail to see that Darwin is here dealing, not with imaginary, but with true causes; nor can we fail to discern what vast modifications may be produced by natural selection in periods sufficiently long. Each individual...
Seite 315 - Either let us open our doors freely to the conception of creative acts, or abandoning them, let us radically change our notions of Matter.
Seite 310 - And if we see with our eyes only in the same manner as we do with glasses, the like may justly be concluded, from analogy, of all our other senses.
Seite 317 - ... that as regards these questions, science claims unrestricted right of search. It is not to the point to say that the views of Lucretius and Bruno, of Darwin and Spencer, may be wrong. Here I should agree with you, deeming it indeed certain that these views will undergo modification.
Seite 316 - In fact the whole process of evolution is the manifestation of a Power absolutely inscrutable to the intellect of man. As little in our day as in the days of Job can man by searching find this Power out.
Seite 313 - This is done without a trace of ill-temper. He moves over the subject with the passionless strength of a glacier ; and the grinding of the rocks is not always without a counterpart in the logical pulverization of the objector.
Seite 317 - And if rough walls and protruding rafter-ends indicate that on one side the edifice is still incomplete, it is only by wise combination of the parts required with those already irrevocably built that •we can hope for completeness. There is no necessary incongruity between what has been accomplished and what remains to be done. The moral glow of Socrates, which we all feel by ignition, has in it nothing incompatible with the physics of Anaxagoras which he so much scorned, but which he would hardly...

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