Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

v. 328. Posse. Gr. 545. 2. I) A. & S. 239, R. 2. - 391. Or. batura patres; a bitter sarcasm. Ponat. Gr. 491. A. & S. 262, and R. I. — 393. Meruisse; sc. cum. Gr. 545. 2. 2); 453. 2. A. & S. 206 (4). Rexerit. Gr. 501. I. A. & S. 264. I. - 395. Velit. Gr. 492. 3. A. & S. 262. The neve serves to connect circumstant with rogant, and rogant with velit; and they beg that he will not, etc. Rebus. See on v. 307. So precibus, v. 397. — 396. Voce. Gr. 414. 3. A. & S. 247. 2. • - 397. Regaliter regis. — 398. Terrore. Gr. 414. 2. A. & S. 247. 1. — - 399. Dolens propter dolorem. Stimulo et verbere. Gr. 414. 4. A. & S. 247. 3. 400. Natum; i. e. mortem nati. Illis. See on v. 307.

[ocr errors]

METAMORPHOSES. BOOK III.

THE STORY OF CADMUS AND THE DRAGON. [vv. 1 - 130.]

1. Deus = Jupiter, who, under the disguise of a bull, had carried Europa, the daughter of Agenor, king of Phoenicia, from her native country to Crete. Imagine. Gr. 431. A. & S. 257. So orbe, v. 6.

2. Se; sc. esse Jovem. Dictaea Cretan; from the mountain Dicte, on which Jupiter was said to have been brought up, whence his surname, Dictaeus. — 3. Pater = Agenor. Ignarus ; i. e. ignorant of the fate of Europa, to whom raptam refers. Cadmo Cadmus, son of Agenor. Gr. 385. A. & S. 223, R. 2. – 4. Imperat. Gr. 467. III. ; 518. 3. A. & S. 145. I. 3 ; 263. 5. Invenerit is the fut. perf. — 5. Facto. Gr. 429. A. & S. 250. I. Pius; i. e. in filiam. Sceleratus ; (crudelis) in filium. - 6. Pos. sit. Gr. 486. II. A. & S. 260, R. 5. - 8. Agenorides. Gr. 316. A. & S. 100. I. - 9. Sit ... habitanda. Gr. 229; 525. A. & S. 162. 15; 265. – 10. Tibi. Gr. 386. A. & S. 224. Solis soli. tariis, desertis. – 11. Aratri. See on decoris, II. 382. – 12. Hao duce. . Gr. 431. A. & S. 257, R. 7 (a) and (6). Carpe vias take your way. Herba. Gr. 422. 1. 2). A. & S. 254, R. 3. - 13. Fac condas See that you build. Gr. 493. 2. A. & S. 262, R. 4.

- 14. Castalio ... antro; i. e. the cave in Mount Parnasus which was the seat of the Delphic oracle, and which Ovid here calls Castalian, from the neighboring fount of that name, sacred to Apollo and the Muses. Gr. 422. 2. A. & S. 255, R. 3 (6). - 16. Cervice. See on herba, v. 12. -17. Presso tardo. Cf. Livy, XXVIII. 14: Hispanos presso gradu incedere jubet. Auctorem. Gr. 363. A. & S. 204. - 19. Vada. Gr. 371. 3. ' A. & S. 233, R. I. Cephisi. See on I. 369. Panopes = of Panope, a city of Phocis. See on I. 313. -20. Cornibus. Gr. 429. A. & S. 250. I. -21, Mugitibus. Gr. 414. 4. A. & S. 247. 3. Impulit=set in motion, shook. 24. Agit grates. See on II. 152. Terrae. Gr. 384. II. A. & S. 223.' So yovi, v. 26. – 26. Ire. Gr. 551. II. 1. A. & S. 273. 2 (d).

- 27. Libandas for a libation. Gr. 565. 3. 2). A. & S. 274, R. 7 (a). The water for such a purpose must be taken from a running stream. — 28. Securi. Gr. 414. 4. A. & S. 247. 3. – 30. Effici. ens - -arcum=forming a low arch with stones joined together.

- 31. Aquis. Gr. 429. A. & S. 250. I. Antro. See on v, 16. 32. Martius. Some say that the dragon was the son of Mars and Tilphossa, the Fury; others, that it was sacred to Mars. Cristis

et auro = cristis aureis. Gr. 704. II. 2. A. & S. 323. 2 (3). – 35. Tyria. Tyre was a city of Phoenicia. See on v. 1. - -36. Gradu. Gr. 414. 3. A. & S. 247. 2.

- 37. Antro. See on v. 14. So manibus, v. 39. -- 42. Sinuatur=winds himself. See on II. 343.

- 43. Media — parte; sc. corporis = more than half his length. 44. Corpore. Gr. 428. A. & S. 211, R. 6. Quanto; sc. is est. See on II. 138. — 45. Spectes. Gr. 503. III. A. & S. 261. 2. — Arctos. See on II. 132 and 171. - 46. Phoenicas. Gr. 98. A. & S. 85, Ex. 2. Parabant. Gr. 474, and 2. A. & S. 259, R. 4 (3). - 48. Occupat=attacks.

51. Sit. Gr. 525. A. & S. 265. Sociis. Gr. 387. A. & S. 226. Agenore. Gr. 425. 3. I). A. & S. 246. — 52. Leoni. Gr. 385. 4. A. & S. 224, R. 2. 53. Erat; sc. ei he had. Ferro. See on corpore, v. 44.

54. Telo. Gr. 417. A. & S. 256, R. 1. — 56. Cor. poris. Gr. 396. IV. A. & S. 211, R. 6. -57. Lingua. Gr. 414. 4. A. & S. 247. 3. So dextra (sc. manu), v. 59. — 60. Magnum magno. Gr. 596. A. & S. 279. 4. — 62. Mota forent = would have been moved. Gr. 297. III. 2 and foot-note ; 486. I. A. & S. 154, R. 3; 261, R. 4. — 64. Repulit; with antepenult lengthened. See on II. 157. - - 65. Quoque. Gr. 602. III. A. & S. 279. 3 (d). — 66. Curvamine. See on cervice, v. 16. — 68. Dolore. Gr. 414. 2. A. & S. 247. 1 (1). – 71. Tergo. See on v. 37. Ossibus. Gr. 384. I. A. & S. 223. — 76 Ore. See on v. 37. Stygio. See on I. 139. 77, 78. Ipse — cingitur = Now he winds himself into a great coil; literally, with coils making great circle. See on II. 343. Trabe. See on v. 54. Exstat extends himself. — 79. Impete; for impetu, which is not admissible before a consonant in hexameter verse. Gr. 133. A. & S. 94. – 81. Spolio the skin. Gr. 414. 4. A. & S. 247. 3. — 84. Ferro. Gr. 384. II. A. & S. 223.

85. Palato. Gr. -422. 1. 2). A. & S. 254, R. 3. 88. Dabat retro drew back; like retrahebat. Gr. 469. II. A. & S. 145. II. 1. Sedere

Gr. 414

to pierce deeply, or penetrate. Gr. 551. II. 1. A. & S. 251, R. 2. So ire. — 89. Cedendo. Gr. 566. I. A. & S. 275, R. 4. -90. In gutture=in guttura ; the reading of some editions. 91. Eunti; sc. serpenti. Gr. 386. A. & S. 224. 94. Gemuit; sc. arbor. Sua robora; subject of flagellari. Gr. 551. III, A. & S. 273, N. 7.

95. Dum - hostis - while the victor is contemplating the magnitude of his vanquished foe. On victor victi, see on v. 60. 97. Unde=whence (it came). The warning came from Mars (see on v. 32), by whom Cadmus and his wife Harmonia, or Hermione, were afterwards changed to serpents. Agenore. See on v. 51. 98. Serpens. Gr. 362. 2. 2). A. & S. 210. On tu see Gr. 367. 2. I). A. & S. 209, R. 1 (6). — 100. Terrore. Gr. 414. 2.

A. & S. 247 1 (2). — 101. Fautrix. Gr. 363. A. & S. 204. So incrementa, v. 103, and semina, v, 105, - 102. Pallas; or Minerva, the goddess of wisdom. Motae ploughed. Gr. 579. A. & S. 274. 3 (6). Terrae. See on v. 91. — 103. Vipereos of the serpent. Gr. 398. 2. A. & S. 211, R. 4 (a). - 104. Presso held down ; pressed into the earth. – 105. Humi, Gr. 424. 2.

A. & S. 221, R. 3. Mor. talia of men.

See on v. 103. - 106. Fide majus = (a wonder) beyond belief. Gr. 417. A. & S. 256. 2. - 107. Prima. Gr. 443. 2. A. & S. 205, R. 15 (6). Acies the point. — 103. Tegmina capitum helmets, Picto cono = = with painted crest. 3. A. & S. 247. 2. — lll. Aulaea. In the Roman theatre, the curtain was wound round a roller under the stage, and was let down at the beginning, and raised at the end, of the play. Cf. Horace E. II. 1. 189. As it was raised, the upper part of the figures (signa) painted on it would appear first. -113. Placidoque- tenore drawn up with gentle and even motion. - 114. Margine; sc. aulaeorum. — 115. Hoste. Gr. 414. 2. A. & S. 247. I.

- 116. Cape; sc. arma. - 117. Nec. Gr. 538. 1. A. & S. 267, R. I and N. Bellis. See on v. 91. Civilibus - inter fratres. — 119. Ferit; i. e. unus, v. 116. Ipse refers to the same person, and eum which is to be supplied as object of dederat; also illo. - 121. Modo=just now. Auras =the breath; the life. - 122, 123. Suo Marte in fight with one another. Gr. 705. II. A. & S. 324. 2. Subiti suddenly born; just sprung from the earth. - 124. Juventus=juvenes. — 125. Trepido pectore lay with palpitating breasts ; j. e. dying. Matrem terram. Cf. terrigenis, v. 118. — 126. Quinque. Gr. 431. A. & S. 257, R. 7 (a). — 127. Humi. See on V. 105.

Tritonidis Minerva. Some derive the name from Lake Tritonis in Libya, near which she was said to have been born ; others, from the stream Triton, in Boeotia, where she was worshipped; others, from Tpitá, head, because, according to some traditions, she sprang from the head of Jupiter. -128. Fidem =a promise, a

Gr. 500.

pledge. - 129. Sidonius hospes the Sidonian stranger; i e. Cadmus. Sidon was the chief city of Phoenicia. — 130. Quumurbem=when he built the city commanded by the oracle of Phoebus. See on v. 103.

THE STORY OF BACCHUS AND THE SAILORS. [vv. 582 – 691.] Pentheus, king of Thebes, was the son of Echion and Agave, daughter of Cadmus. He endeavored to prevent his subjects from paying divine honors to Bacchus ; and, while the Theban women were celebrating the orgies of the god, he ordered his servants to seize the pretended deity and bring him before him. They cannot find Bacchus, but return with Acoetes, one of his priests. Pentheus is enraged, and threatens to kill Acoetes, but bids him first tell his story; which he does in the extract here given. ·

582. Metu. Gr. 399. 5. 3). A. & S. 250. 2 (1). Mihi. Gr. 387. A. & S. 226 and R. 1. — 583. Maeonia=Maeonian ; usually=Lydian, but here=Tyrrhenian, or Etrurian. The Lydians are said to have colonized Etruria. - 584. The order in prose would be : Pater mihi arva non reliquit quae duri juvenci colerent. On colerent, see

A. & S. 264, R. 5. - 586. Lino. Gr. 414. 4. A. & S. 247. 3. So hamis and calamo.- 587. Ducere=to draw out. -588. Illi. See on mihi, v. 582. Census = wealth, estate. Cf. Hor. C. II. 15. 13. Traderet. Gr. 518. II. 1. A. & S. 263, R. 2. - 589. Studii=of my employment, or trade, — 591. Paternum

my patrimony. — 592. Haererem. Gr. 491. A. &. S. 262 and R. 5. Isdem=iisdem. Gr. p. 61, foot-note, and 669. II. A. & S. 306 (1). — 593, 594. Addidici regimen ... flectere I learned also to turn the helm. Carinae=of the ship. Gr. 705. III. A. & S. 324. 3. 594. Oleniae Capellae : of the Olenian goat. The goat Amalthea, which suckled Jupiter, was rewarded by being placed among the stars, on the shoulder of Auriga, the Charioteer. It was called Olenian, from the town Olenus, in Achaia (or, as some say, from the town of the same name in Aetolia), near which it was born. Pluviale; because its rising was in the rainy season. - 595. Taygeten; one of the Pleiades, “the Seven Stars ” in the constellation Taurus. They were daughters of Atlas (hence called Atlantides), and are said to have been changed into stars on account of their grief at the death of their sisters, the Hyades, or at the fate of their father. Hyadas = the Hyades, five (or seven) sisters of the Pleiades, forming another familiar group in the same constellation, placed there by Jupiter in compassion for their grief at the death of their brother Hyas. They are called pluviae by Virgil, A. I. 744, III. 516, and tristes by Horace, C. I. 3. 14. The fables concerning the Pleiades and the Hyades are many and various Arcton=the Bear. See on II. 132 and 171, and cf. Virgil, G. I. 138. Taygeten,

Cf.

[ocr errors]

Gr. 525.

Hyadas, and Arcton are Greek forms. So Delon, v. 597. – 596. Domos; i. e. the quarters of the sky from which they come. Virgil, G. I. 371. Puppibus =ships. See on v. 593. See also Gr. 391. 1. A. & S. 222, R. 1. -- 597. Delon= Delos ; an island in the Aegean Sea, one of the Cyclades (see on II. 264), famous as the birth-place of Apollo and Diana, and as one of the chief seats of their worship. It was also a great commercial centre. Chiae telluris Chios; one of the largest and most noted of the islands in the Aegean. — 598. Litora. Gr. 374. 6. A. & S. 233 (1). Remis. Gr. 414. 4. A. & S. 247. 3. — 599. Do saltus = salio, as dedit sonitum, v. 37 = sonuit. Arenae. Gr. 386. A. & S. 224. 601, 602. Laticesque — admoneo=and I order my crew to take in fresh water. Gr. 558. VI. and 3. A. & S. 218, R. 2; 273. 2 and (6). Ducat. Gr. 500. A. & S. 264. 5. Undas = the springs, or fountains, whence the supply was to be got. -603. Quid aura promittat what the wind may promise ; i. e. what weather to expect. A. & S. 265. – 607. Forma.

Gr. 428. A. & S. 211, R. 6. — 608. Mero. Gr. 414. 2. A. & S. 247. I (1). — 609. Vix=with difficulty. Cultum=dress. 610. Posset. Gr. 501. I. A. & S. 264. 7. — 612. Sit. See on v. 603. – 613. Faveas. Gr. 488. I. and 2. A. & S. 260, R. 6. Laboribus. Gr. 385. A. & S. 223, R. 2. -614. His =to these ; i. e. the sailors who had seized him. Mitte cease. — 615. Quo. Gr. 417. A. & S. 256. 2. Conscendere. Gr. 552. 3. A. & S. 270, R. I (a). — 616. Ocior. Gr. 166. A. & S. 126. 1. 617. Prorae tu. tela=proreta ; who had charge of the fore-part of the ship. — 618. Qui - remis =who with his voice kept time (or marked time) for the rowers. He is called animorum hortator, because by his singing he cheered them in their labor. — 621. Violari. Gr. 551.

A. & S. 273. 4 (a). Pinum. Cf. I. 95. – 622. Mihi. See on v. 582. Juris=of authority. — 625. Exsilium - luebat =was paying the penalty of exile for a dreadful murder. — 626. Mihi. Gr. 398. 5. A. & S. 211, R. 5 (1). Pugno. Gr. 414. 4. A. & S. 247. 3. — 627. Rupit = struck violently. Excussum ; sc. navi, from the ship. Misisset. Gr. 510. A. & S. 261. I. Si non=nisi ; which would be required in prose. - 628. Amens senseless, stunned.

629. Bacchus; the son of Jupiter and Semele, and the god of wine, which he invented and taught men to make. — 630, 631. Solutus sit. Gr. 503. II. and 506. A. & S. 263. 2 (1). A mero = from the wine ; i. e. from intoxication. Gr. 705. II. A. & S. 324. 2.

- 632, 633. Qua ope=by what means. 634. Proreus; i. e. Melanthus. See v. 617 and note. It is the subject of dixit. — 635. Velis. See on v. 603. Terra - petita = you shall be landed on

II. 1.

« ZurückWeiter »