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of hendiadys: aditus per centum (i. e. multa) lata ostia. They would seem to be the doors between the adytum and the temple. — 45. Limen; sc. antri. Poscere fata is explained by vv. 51, 52. The sacrifices had been performed, but prayer was still necessary to obtain the responses, and this was the time for prayer, since the god had manifested himself. For the construction see on G. I. 213. — 46. Cui. Gr. 398. 5. A. & S. 211, R. 5 (1). — 47. Unus the same (as before).-49, 50. Rabie; with tument. Videri; with major. Cf. niveus videri, Hor. C. IV. 2. 59. Gr. 552. 3. A. & S. 270, R. 1. The Sibyl seems to increase in stature under the divine afflatus. - 50. Mortale. Cf. I. 328.51. Cessas in vota; i. e. cessas vota facere? Forb. compares audere in proelia, II. 347. — 52. Ante; sc. quam feceris vota. 53. Attonitae; referring to the spellbound silence which prevents the opening (Henry). — 54, 55. Cf. II. 120. - 56. Cf. I. 597. — 57. Direxti. Gr. 234. 3. A. & S. 162. 7 (c). — 58. Aeacidae. See on I. 99. -59. Penitusque repostas = longe remotas. Cf. III. 364. — 60. Massylum. See on IV. 132. Syrtibus; abl. Cf. IV. 172 (Con.). Many make it dat. like sinu, III. 692. 62. Hac. tenus: tmesis. Fuerit. Gr. 487. A. & S. 260, R. 6. Trojana fortuna is said bitterly: Troy's usual fortune. — 66–68. Venturi = the future. Gr. 399. 2. 2). A. & S. 213, R. 1. Nonfatis; parenthetical. Fatis; dat., like fatis debitus Arruns, XI. 759, or abl., like fatis mihi debita tellus, VII. 120. Da...considere. Cf. V. 689. —71-76. Aeneas promises the Sibyl that her oracular books (see on Hor C. S. 5) shall be deposited in a temple. Lectos viros; i. e. the quindecimviri. Alma. See on G. I. 7. Tantum is common in adjurations. Foliis, etc. Cf. III. 444. Canas; sc. ut. Cf. III. 457.—77-80. Phoebi nondum patiens=not yet yielding to Phoebus; i. e. struggling against the divine possession, which is a painful strain upon her mortal nature. Immanis; adverbially with bacchatur. Possit. See on recurras, Hor. S. II. 6. 31, and cf. A. I. 181, etc. Excussisse; aoristic perf. So patuere, v. 81. Fatigat, etc.; a metaphor taken from the use of the bit in managing a horse. Cf. vv. 100, 101. The object of fingit is the Sibyl herself, not os. Cf. G. II. 407. Premendo; by restraint. - 81, 82. Aeneas is in the temple, the Sibyl in the adytum, the cavern beyond.

See on v. 43. 83-87. Sed - manent is made a parenthesis by

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many critics, but, since O— periclis is in fact an announcement, the pointing here adopted seems better. Terrae; the limiting rather than the locative genitive. Sed — volent : but they shall not wish that they had come ; i. e. shall wish they had not come. Thybrim. Cf. II. 782. 88-92. Simois... Xanthus. See on I. Ico, 473. Defuerint. Gr. 473. I. A. & S. 259, R. 1 (5). Turnus. Cf. E. IV. 36. Partus. Cf. II. 784.

Achilles; i. e. Latio in Latium.

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Natus-dea= and he too born of a goddess (i. e. Venilia). Addita merely strengthens nec usquam aberit. Quum makes the transition from the declarative to the exclamatory form of sentence. -93. Lavinia was to be the prize of the second war as Helen had been of the first. Hospita; i. e. non Trojana. — 95. Contra; sc. mala. Audentior all the bolder (for opposition). — 96. Quam as far as. —97. Urbe ; i. e. Pallanteum, the city of Evander, with whom Aeneas afterwards makes an alliance (Book VIII). — 99-101. Remugit is explained by antro; the cave echoing the voice of the Sibyl. Obscuris-involvens―wrapping truth in mystery. Ea has the force of adeo. The metaphor is the same as in v. 77 foll. Furenti. Gr. 384. II. A. & S. 223. Sub pectore. See on I. 36. Vertit=plies.-104. Mi mihi. -105. Peregi. Cf. exigit, IV. 476. — 107. Dicitur: is said (to be). Acheronte refuso of (from) overflowing Acheron : the abl. being either absolute or descriptive. See on G. II. 492. — 109. Contingat. Gr. 488. I. A. & S. 260, R. 6. So doceas and pandas. — 110, 111. Cf. II. 721 foll. Humeris. Gr. 414. 4. A. & S. 247. 3. — 112–114. Maria — ferebat; i. e. he sailed on every sea with me, and bore all the dangers of wind and wave. Invalidus; sc. etsi. Sortem = the (usual) lot. -116-118. Gnati patrisque. Gr. 406. I. A. & S. 215. Potes omnia = you are all-powerful. Gr. 380. 2. A. & S. 232 (3). Hecate. See on IV. 511. Avernis. Cf. vv. 237 foll. and Ov. M. V. 540. — 119–123. Si potuit, etc. The conclusion is implied, not expressed: If others have obtained this favor, why should not I, whose claims are as great? Orpheus. See Ov. M. X. Introd. and cf. M. XI. 2. Cithara. Gr. 419. IV. A. & S. 244. Pollux. See on Hor. C. I. 3. 2. Castor was mortal, Pollux immortal. The latter was allowed to share his immortality with his brother, the two dying on alternate days, or, according to another myth, for alternate half-years. Thesea... Alciden. Cf. vv. 392, 393 and see on Hor. C. IV. 7. 27. Memorem. Gr. 486. II. A. & S. 260, R. 5. Mi=mihi: possessive dat. Cf. I. 380. — 124. Cf. IV. 219. -126. Averno; dative for in Avernum: to the lower world.—127. Atri. See on Ov. M. V. 404 and Hor. C. I. 24. 18. – 129-132. Aequus here = kind, partial. Ardens, etc. Cf. v. 394. Tenent-atro; i.. e. between the place where they are now standing and the shades a pathless forest and the river Cocytus intervene. Sinu= winding. ·133. Cf. II. 10, 349. —134. Innare. Gr. 563. 6. A. & S. 275. III. N. 1. Lacus; because a sluggish stream. Cf. v. 323.136. Arbore; poetic abl. of place. -137. Foliis... vimine. Gr. 429. A. & S. 250. 1.-138. Proserpina is Juno inferna, as Pluto is Juppiter Stygius, IV. 638. Dictus sacer= dedicatus. 139. Convallibus; instr. abl. — 140, 141. Sed: but, hard as it is to find the bough, it is the only passport. Qui. The construction

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is: non ante datur quam (ei) qui, etc. i. e. non datur nisi ei qui. 144. Simili is virtually eodem. Metallo; with frondescit. 145. Ergo; since it is so important. Rite=duly; with repertum, or, as most critics prefer, with carpe. - 149. Jacet= lies (unburied). See on II. 557. Tibi; dativus incommodi. — 150. Funere. Cf. II. 539. — 151. Consulta: the decrees (of the gods, or of destiny). Pendes: delay, linger. 152. Sedibus; i. e. the tomb. Sepulcro. Cf. III. 67. -153. Duc; sc. ad aras. Nigras. Cf. v. 243. Prima = preliminary. — 156. Lumina. Gr. 380. A. & S. 234. II. — 158. Cui. See on II. 704. - 159. Vestigia figit; i. e. walks slowly, as one lost in thought. — 164, 165. Aeoliden; probably son of Aeolus, a noble Trojan, mentioned XII. 542. Ciere. See on E. V. 1.-167. Lituo. See on Hor. C. I. 1. 23. Join with insignis.— 168. Illum; Hector. — 170. Inferiora ; a Grecism for inferiorem. — 171. Personat. See on I. 741 and cf. VI. 417. Concha; Triton's own instrument. Cf. Ov. M. I. 333. 173, 174. Exceptum... immerserat exceperat et immerserat. Cf. III. 332. —176-178. Cf. I. 220. Jussa; acc. with festinant. Cf. IV. 575. Aram sepulcri; i. e. a pyre piled up like an altar. Coelo educere. Cf. II. 186.-179–182. Itur. Cf. IV. 151. Cuneis, etc. Cf. G. I. 144. Montibus; sc. de. Advolvunt; sc. litori, or pyrae. — 183, 184. Primus; like praecipue, v. 176. Aeneas takes up an axe like the rest.—187-189. Arbore = on the tree. Ostendat. Gr. 488. I. A. & S. 263. I. The sense is: Would that the first part of the Sibyl's words may prove as true as the second has done. -190. Forte denotes the coincidence. - 193. Maternas. Cf. V. 72 and G. I. 28. —194. Este est; i. e. este duces viae, si qua est. Cursum (your) flight. —195. Pinguem rich (as producing aught so rich). — 196. Rebus; dative. Forsake not our cause at this crisis."—197. Pressit; i. e. repressit. — 198. Ferant. Gr. 525. A. & S. 265. Cf. II. 171. — 199, 200. They keep flying on and alighting to feed alternately. Prodire; historical infin. Possent. Gr. 500. A. & S. 264. 5. Servare. Cf. v. 338.

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201. Graveolentis. Gr. 669. II. A. & S. 306 (1) and (2). — 203. Sedibus optatis - having chosen their place to settle; or optatis may refer to Aeneas's wish to find the tree. Super = on the top of. 204. Aura = splendor. — 206. Non sua; as in G. II. 82. Seminat = produces. — 211. Cunctantem; with reference to avidus, not = resisting. See vv. 147 foll. 212. Nec interea; a common form of transition in Virgil. - 213. Cineri ; proleptic. Ingrato = gratiam non sentienti: unconscious. -214217. Join taedis with pinguem, robore with ingentem (Henry and Con.). Cf. IV. 505. Atris; i. e. from funereal trees. Ante ... constituunt = place in front; i. e. as a facing to the pile. This

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seems, on the whole, the simplest and most satisfactory of the various interpretations. Decorantque · armis; i. e. they throw upon the pile the arms of Misenus, or those of enemies despoiled by him. 218, 219. Undantia; with flammis, referring to the boiling. Expediunt. Compare I. 178.-220. Fit gemitus. Cf. I. 725; II. 209. Toro=feretro, the bier being burnt on the pile. Defleta; like fleti, v. 481, the de, however, adding intensity. - 221. Nota; i. c. which he had worn when alive. Some understand it to refer to the custom of wrapping the dead in purple robes at great Roman funerals. — 222. Feretro; abl. probably, though it may be the dative. The acc. is more common with this sense of subire. 223-225. Ministerium; in apposition with the action of the preceding verb. A. & S. 204, R. 9. Subjectam... tenuere subjecere et tenuere. Cf. II. 37. Parentum : majorum. Dapes; the victims. Olivo; for oleo, as in E. V. 68. Gr. 428. A. & S. 211, R. 6. — 228. Lecta; collected from the pile. Cado; an urn. 229–231. The lustration is performed to purify the crews from the pollution caused by the clead body, v. 150. Socios unda; a variety for circumtulit socios puram undam. Rore et ramo: hendiadys. Novissima verba. Cf. IV. 650.—233. Arma must refer to remumque tubamque, if we understand that his arms were burnt on the pile, v. 217. Or we may adopt the explanation of Serv. that the arms were sculptured on the tomb. Viro explains sua, which would naturally refer to Aeneas. -235. It is still known as Punta di Miseno. 237. This cave is not the one mentioned in vv. II, 42.—238. Tuta=sheltered: part. as in I. 571.-242. The genuineness of this verse is doubtful. Aornon ; i. e. birdless. - 243. See on v. 153, and cf. V. 97. · -244. Cf. V. 237 and IV. 61.-247. Cf. IV. 510, 511.—249. The blood is caught in bowls that it may afterwards be poured out, apparently on the ground. Cf. III. 67; V. 78. Ipse: Aeneas also performs a sacrifice, in the Homeric fashion.

– 250. The mother of the Furies was Nox, and her great sister was Terra. See on Ov. M. X. 46. — 252. Stygio regi= Pluto. Cf. IV. 638. Sacrifices to the infernal gods were performed by night. Cf. Hor. C. S. Introd. 253. Solida=integra. Inchoat. Cf. instaurat, IV. 73.-254. Super... fundens: tmesis. For super see on puer, E. IX. 66. - 256. Cf. IV. 490. Juga silvarum; i. e. the ridges covered with woods. Cf. Hor. S. II. 6. 91. —257. Canes; infernal hounds accompanying Hecate.-258. Profani; the companions of Aeneas who were not to go with him. -260. Why Aeneas is told to draw his sword is not clear. Cf. vv. 290 foll. It might serve, from association, “to keep his courage up.” — 261. Animis. Gr. 419. V. A. & S. 243. · -264. Cf. V. 235. Umbrae are the ghosts, the silentes of v. 432.—265. Cf. IV. 510. Phlegethon. Cf. vv. 550 foll. Loca; vocative, like Umbrae, Chaos, and Phlegethon.

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-266. Bit-fas― let it be right for me. The second sit = liceat, 268. Obscuri. Cf. II. 135. 269. or fas may be understood. Inania regna. Cf. leves populos, Ov. M. X. 14.—270-272. Cf. II. 255, 340. Incertam lunam; "the struggling moonbeam's misty light." Maligna. See on G. II. 179. Juppiter; as the god of the sky. See on E. VII. 60. - 273. Cf. II. 469. — 274. Ultrices Curae; the stings of conscience (Serv.).— 276. Malesuada which tempts to crime. Turpis = squalid. — 278–281. Mala gaudia=malae mentis gaudia, i. e. all evil pleasures. The Furies have their home here, though they are at work elsewhere, v. 563. Ferreique. Gr. 669. II. A. & S. 306. Crinem. Gr. 380. A. & S. 234. II. —282-284. In medio; sc. vestibulo. Vulgo ; with tenere rather than ferunt. Vana; fallacious as well as insubstantial. Haerent; sc. somnia. — 285–289. Monstra ferarum=monstruosae ferae. Scyllae; rhetorical plural, like Milton's "Hydras and Chimeras dire." Cf. III. 420 foll. Briareus. See on Gyas, Hor. C. III. 4. 69. Belua Lernae; the Lernaean Hydra, slain by Hercules. Gorgones. See on Ov. M. IV. 779. Harpyiae. See III. 211 foll. Forma-umbrae: i. e. the triple-bodied giant Geryon. Cf. Hor. C. II. 14. 8. — 293, 294. Admoneat... irruat. See on I. 58, 59. Diverberet. Cf. V. 503.—295–297. Virgil's conception of the four infernal rivers is very confused. Aeneas crosses but one, which, though called the Styx, v. 385, would seem to be the same as the Acheron or Cocytus here. Eructat = disgorges. -299, 300. Terribili squalore; not with horrendus, but as a second epithet. Stant-flamma; i. e. his eyes are fixed orbs of fire. Cf. Hor. C. I. 9. 1. 302-304. Ipse; old as he was. Velis; either dat. (tends the sails) or abl. (manages the boat by means of the sails). Ferruginea; the same as caeruleam, v. 410. Sed — senectus but a god has a fresh and vigorous (lit. "green") old age. 305. Huc... ad ripas. See on E. I. 54.310. Lapsa; nearly decussa (Död.). Ad terram; i. e. to the shore of the warmer clime which they have sought beyond the sea. - 311. Annus. See on Hor. Ep. II. 29. — 313. Primi ut primi transirent, to cross first. 314. Amore; as in I. 171. — 316. Submotos arcet. See on submersas obrue, I. 69. — 318. Quid vult - what means. - 320. Cf. III. 668.-322. Deum. See on E. IV.

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-327, 328.

Gr. 374. 6.

49. 323. See on v. 296. For vides cf. I. 338. — 324. Cf. Ov. M. II. 45. Numen. See on undas, Ov. M. II. 101. Datur; sc. Charonti. Transportare; sc. mortuos. A. & S. 233 (1). Sedibus. See on v. 152. - 330. Stagna; as in v. 323. - 331. Cf. v. 197 and V. 244. 334. Leucaspim; not mentioned elsewhere by Virg. Oronten. See I. 113. -335. Simul; with obruit. It is quite as well to join it, as Con.

Cf. v. 316.

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