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down his foot on any corner of the said, Here are two ; and making a earth without meeting with Christians third, asked him, if that was not and Saints. He asked the Saint what three? and the other answering in the sort of conscience his master had, that affirmative, the Saint dropped the three he was for taking all to himself, and folds, and stretched out all that part would leave him nothing, though he of his garment in one piece between must be sensible, it was much more his hands, without any folds; and the fear of him, than any love for his the Devil, after such a palpable deantagonist, that made so many Christi- monstration, now acknowledged that ans, and desired the Saint might in. he clearly understood the nature of troduce him to Christ, so that they the Trinity. might settle their affairs in an amica- This matter being discussed, the ble manner? Saint Christopher re- little boy begged St Christopher to plied, he did not really know where carry him on his shoulder over a deep to find Jesus Christ at present, but said and rapid river running close by them, he believed he was with his father and to which the Saint consented, though mother in the city of Heliopolis, in the Devil cautioned him how he medEgypt. The Devil said he had not dled with that little boy, of whom he time to go so far that night, but that still had his doubts, as to who he realhe thought the little boy the Saint ly was. However, the Saint took him had there with him very much re. up, but before he got to the middle, sembled Jesus Chrilt, to the best of of the river, he was ready to fink unhis remembrance, when he saw him der the enormous load, and began to once at a distance about seven hund. call out, at which the Devil laughed red years before, going into the Tem- heartily, and asked him why he would ple at Jerusalem. The Saint assured not follow his advice? The boy said him he was not Christ, and the little to the Saint while on his shoulder in boy himself declared, that so far from the river, . If Adas formerly found it, he was only the son of a poor Car- the weight of the Poles of this world, penter of Nazareth, who, with the a load he could hardly bear, no wonsweat of his forehead, had much trou- der, Christopher, that though a Giant, ble to earn wherewith to buy a couple you should find me much heavier, of pilchards and a bit of brown bread who am Creator not only of this world, for himself and his mother to eat. but of the Sun, the Moon, and all

After this, St Christopher and the the planetary system.' On the boy's Devil had a long conversation upon Laying this, the Saint found himself the nature of the Trinity; and this instantancoully relieved, and on setlast concluded, it was upon the whole ting him down on the other side, be such an intricate contradictory piece fell on his knees to worship him, and of business, that he confessed he could then making the sign of the cross over not comprehend it. Upon this the the water upon the Devil, the Prince Saint very familiarly tells the Devil of Darkness immediately vanished inbe must be a great blockhead, hum to fame and smoke, leaving a strong pedaço d'Asno) a piece of an ass li- fulphureous smell behind him. terally, for that nothing was more This piece concludes with a scene, self-evident and intelligent, adding, which is a constant favourite with the that he would make it so even to him people of this country: It was a conin an instant. On this he took up versation of some gallants with their with his left hand the skirt of his own Nuus at the parlour grate of a Congown or habit, and making a fold of vent. After many bombast asseveraa part of it with his right, said, Here tions of love and attachment, intersperis one; then making another fold, fed with double entendre on both sides,

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the Ladies desire the Gentlemen to for it. The Cobler was particularly entertain them with a dance, which provoked on seeing this, and faid, he they did, by dancing the fofa, two would soon convince him ; so, riling and two to the Guitar, and afterwards from his tripod in a rage, and taking another dance still more indecent and up his last, or form, threw it with such obscene, only practised by the black force at his antagonist, as diade a large men and women of Lisbon, and this cut on his forehead. • Now, (faid the last part of the entertainment especial- Cobler, exulting) after what my form ly went off with great applause. has done, I'll answer for it, there will

The scene of the after-piece lay in be produced matter in abundance.' This a Spanish Cobler's shop, the Cobler at tuin of wit raised great applaufe in the work with his wife by him, (who was house, after which the Cobler, the two rather handsome) and two of their gof- Friars, the Maxo and Maria, being, it fips, the one a Bernardine, and the o- seems, each provided with a leather ther a Franciscan Fryar, who were strap or thong, began beating each ofrom time to time casting a leering ther about the stage, to the entertaineye at the wife, but were at the same ment of the company, and which is time engagedina deep dispute, in which the manner in general in which the the Cobler took a serious part. One Spanish after-pieces end. of the learned Fryars in Gisted there But however absurd, ridiculous, and could exist matter without form, the monstrous these farces may be, it must other was as ftrenuous in su;porting de remembered they are but representhe contrary opinion, saying, that mat. tations calculated to amuse the vulgar, ter and form were inseparable, to always best pleased with whatever apwhich the Cobler himself also adhered, pears most crude, incredible, and giwhile his wife seemed prudently to gantic; besides, even in the beft theaembrace the opinions of both her gos- trical representations there are too of lips. Mean time a young Buck ( Maxo) ten many circumstances which remind enters the shop, and desires the Cob- the spectator they are but pi&tures of ler to mend the strap of his shoe. life, the absurdities whereof can nerer buckle which he had torn in walking. strike half so much surprise, nor affect The Cobler calls to his wife Maria, any of the other pashons near so strong. to know what money was in the house. ly, as when we see the same things hap Maria replied that she had a (Pezo pen in real life. A short account of duro piece of eight, and feven roy- what I have very lately seen pass here, als. The Cobler then turns to the under my own eye, will, I doubt not, Buck, and asks him if he was not support the propriety of this observa. ashamed to desire him to work for tion. him, when he heard he had so much Some thieves having lately broken money in the house ? and told him he into a country Church about four might get his strap mended where he leagues from this, and rummaging 2pleased, for that he would work for bout in the dark for plate and other no man while he was so rich. The plunder among the Altars, they hap dispute concerning matter and form pened to overturn or break open a Pix, ftill went on, and became warm, (by which contained several consecrated the way you must know the words wafers, which were found next mornmateria and forma in Spanish, signifying strewed about on the ground near matter and form, and that the word the Altar, and some of them were forma also signifies a shoe-maker's last) missing, which was reckoned a ftill the party, who insisted matter could greater misfortune. When these cir. exist without form, was very obstinate, cumstances were reported to the without producing one geod reason Queen, they threw her into the deep est affliction : she shut herself up and sultation with the gravest and most was invisible for three days, after orthodox Divines, the whole Court which, the said that all the misfore were ordered into deep mourning for tunes of her late father's reign, and nine days, at the end of which there the judgments with which God had was a general procession from one great visited him, such as earthquakes, the Church to another in the city at a expulsion of the Jesuits, and the war considerable distance, in which the which followed, were altogether no. Queen herself and the Court walked thing, when compared to the grievous in ceremony, and which they called insult which had been offered to the The procellion of the Disaggravation, body of our blessed Saviour himself, and by performing of which they seriand which it became her duty to apo- oufly think they have appeased the logize for, after the most signal man- justly-provoked wrath of the Deity. Der pollible; and, after holding a con eft affiction : The shut herself up and sultation with the gravest and most was invisible for three days, after orthodox Divines, the whole Court which, the said that all the misfor. were ordered into deep tourning for tudes of her late father's reign, and nine days, at the end of which there the judgments with which God had was a general procesfion from one great visited him, such as earthquakes, the Church to another in the city at a expulsion of the Jesuits, and the war considerable distance, in which the which followed, were altogether no. Queen herself and the Court walked thing, when compared to the grievous in ceremony, and which they called insult which had been offered to the The procession of the Difaggravation, body of our blessed Saviour himself, and by performing of which they feriand which it became her duty to apo- ously think they have appeased the logize for, after the most signal man- justly-provoked wrath of the Deity. ner possible; and, after holding a con

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Memoirs of the late War in Asia ; with a Narrative of the Imprisonment and

Sufferings of our Officers and Soldiers. By an Officer of Colonel Baillie's Dec tachment. 2 vols. 8vo. Murray, 1788.

HE object of these volumes is be interesting. “ All mankind natu

explained by the writer of them “ rally enter by sympathy, into the fiin an address to the reader. « The “ tuation of one another, but particu“ relations already publifhed of the late “larly into that of the generous, the u military transactions in India, com- “ brave, and the unfortunate. The “ piled chiefly from gazettes, are too “ particulars relating to our officers

partial to give an adequate idea of “ and soldiers, who fell at different " the skill and exertions of our op- “ times into the hands of Hyder-Ally

ponents, and too general to record “ Khan, and Tippoo Sultan Bahou" the merit and the fate of individuals “ dan, communicated by certain of " in our own fleets and armies. It is “ those sufferers, and for the most part

the object of these memoirs, at the “ by one gentleman who perfevered, " same time that they illustrate the “in the midst of the utmost danger,

connection of military affairs with " in keeping a journal of what paired " politics, the nature and the relations“ from day to day in the principal pri“ of different actions to one another, “ son of Seringapatam, impress the " and the general result of the war,

“ mind with all the tone of a deep to describe not only our own, but “ tragedy :-a tragedy continued by " the valour and address of our ene. “ too perfect an unity of time and "mies, and to particularize the me- “ place, and of suffering, if not of as“rits and the hardships of our coun

« tion, for the space of near four years; “ trymen and others in our service : " while death, according to the image “ for the promotion of their interest, “ of our great classical Poet, thook his “ if they have survived their sufferings; “ dart over their heads, but delayed " for perpetuating their names if they “ to itrike.” The writer of the Me. “ have not; and in both cases, for the moirs also bints at fundry important « fatisfa&tion or consolation of their instances, in which the very particular “ anxious relations and friends.” Nor and circumstantial narrative of the capis it to these only, as the author ob- tivity and sufferings of our men, that ferves, that the fate of men, distinguish- the memorandums and conversation of ed by merit or suffering, or both, will different officers have enabled him to

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Memoirs of the late War in Asia; with a Narrative of the Imprisonment and

Sufferings of our Officers and Soldiers. By an Officer of Colonel Baillie's Dec tachment. 2 vols. 8vo. Murray, 1788.

“ All mankind natuexplained by the writer of them “ rally enter by sympathy, into the fiin an address to the reader. • The « tuation of one another, but particu“ relations already published of the late « larly into that of the generous, the « military transactions in India, com- “ brave, and the unfortunate. The “ piled chiefly from gazettes, are too “particulars relating to our officers “ partial to give an adequate idea of “ and soldiers, who fell at different “ the skill and exertions of our op

6 times into the hands of Hyder-Ally“ ponents, and too general to record “ Khan, and Tippoo Sultan Bahou" the merit and the fate of individuals “ dan, communicated by certain of “ in our own fleets and armies. It is “ those sufferers, and for the most part “ the object of these memoirs, at the “ by one gentleman who persevered, “ same time that they illustrate the “in the midst of the utmost danger, “ connection of military affairs with " in keeping a journal of what passed " politics, the nature and the relations " from day to day in the principal pri“ of different actions to one another, “ son of Seringapatam, impress the “ and the general result of the war,

“ mind with all the tone of a deep “ to describe not only our own, but “ tragedy :- tragedy continued by w the valour and address of our ene- “ too perfect an unity of time and “ mies, and to particularize the me- “ place, and of suffering, if not of ac“ rits and the hardships of our coun- tion, for the space of near four years; “ trymen and others in our service : " while death, according to the image “ for the promotion of their interest, “of our great classical Poet, shook his “ if they have survived their sufferings; “ dart over their heads, but delayed “ for perpetuating their names if they “ to strike.” The writer of the Me“ have not; and in both cases, for the moirs also bints at sundry important « fatisfaction or confolation of their instances, in which the very particular “ anxious relations and friends." Nor and circumstantial narrative of the capis it to these only, as the author ob- tivity and sufferings of our men, that ferves, that the fate of men, distinguish- the memorandums and conversation of ed by merit or suffering, or both, will different afficers have enabled him

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