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the foreign mirkets without loss—a question of some interest as it is now obvious, that with the ailditional impuilse that must be iin paried to the culture by the Opelousas Railroad from the reclamation of swamp lands, and the opening of new plantations in districts hitherto, for all practical purposes, inaccessible froin market, the yield my be inOreased to an amount exceeding the demand for our home supply, in which c.ise the surplus must either be exportel, or bearing upon the market, press down prices, under the invariable law of supply and demand, to a ruinous point. There was no improvement in May, excepting in the higher qualities, which recovereil 1 c, of the previous decline. The following table shows the movement of the inarket with regard to receipts and sales during the seven months ending in May compared with the corresponding period last year.

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November...............
December ..............
January ................
February ..............
March,.................!
April....................
way....................

25.500
37,000
45,000
34.500
18,000

23.000 37,500) 33.7;0) 11.500 51.250 38.0.10) 20,000

19.500
30,150
38,750
21.500
16,500
9.000
9,500

21,300 40,00 13,750 25,000 19.500 11.250 10.500

209,000 2 51,000 1 154,000 17.,000 In comparing these figures, we find that while in 1852 the heaviest receipts were in December and January, in the past year they were in February and March, and so also wil regard to the sales. We also find that the receipts during these seven months show an excess of 76,000 hhds., and exports of 51.000, the sales of 55,000. Dwing the past three months, operations have been on a more limited scale, but still with regard to quan:i'y, bear the same favorable comparison with last year's, the sales comprising 7,100 hhds. in June against 1,250 last year, 5,700 in July against 1,600, and 1,750 in August against 750. The receipts for these three months are 18,500 hhds, against 9.000 last year. The entire receipts of the vear are 27 1.650 hhds, against 186,000 in 1852-3, and 141,000 in 1851.2, and the exports 171,850 against 78,850 in 1852-3,and 50.800 in 1851-2. The seinclude the greater part of the exports from Attakapis, and show wlen compared wi h last year, an increase of 54,150 to New York 1100.650 against 46.5007 9,300 to Philadelphia [ 20.500 against 11.2007; 5,850 to Baltimore 1 16.800 against 10,950); and to other ports 5,300 [36,900 against 31,600).

The actual crop is set down in Mr. CHAMPOMIER's Annual State. ment at 419,324 hhds., which comprises 366,767 hhds, brown made by the old process, and 82,657 Refined, Clarified, Cistern, &c., and the weight is estimated at 195,1.56,000 lbs. This does no! include the Texas crop, which is stated to have been 8.238 hhds. o 1,000 lbs. each, or nearly 3,000 hhds, less than the previous year. The number of Sugirhouses in Louisiana, is stated by Mr. Champomnier to be 1,437, embracing 431 worked by horse power [a decrease compared with last year of 57], and 956 by steam power [an increase of 13), showing a continued tendency to substitute the inore economical and productive agent of steam for the old inefficient mode.

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The amount remaining on hand in the city and State, is estimated at 7,500 hhds.

The following is the actual or estimated yield for the past eleven years, and exhibits an irregular but heavy increase in the product. Crop of Huds. Crop of

Hhds. 1813-4 . 100,000 1849-50

248,000 1844-5 • 200,000 | 1850-1

211,200 1845-6 • 187,000 | 1851-2

. 236,500 1846–7 . 150,000 1852–3 .

321,934 1847-8 .240,000 i 1853-4 . .

. 419,324 1848–9

220,000 The amount of the increase is forcibly illustrated by taking the average of the crops for every five years during the twenty preceding the last year. Total crops from 1833 to '37 inclusive, 340,000 hhds, average 68,000

1838 to '42 " 502,000 6 5 100,400
1843 to '47 4 877,000 kb 56 175,400
1848 to '52
1.237,700 "

247.500 1853 to '54

439,324 " The following table compiled from the Register's Report on the Commerce and Navigation of the U. S., shows the quantity of sugar imported from all countries for five years ending June 30, 1853.

Brown. White Clayed Loaf and

Powdered. other refined. Year ending June 30, 1849, 253,815,485 lbs. 5,103,741, 400,015

1850, 197,661,819 6 19,977,312, 796,219

1851, 367,537,861 « 4,786,437, 12,077,926 66 1852, 450,312,593 4 6,461,540, 736,958

1853, 456,510,627 66 7,108,932, 871,105

16

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From the N. 0. Com. Bulletin of Sept. 1st, 1845. THE COFFEE TRADE.

The stock of Rio Coffce in first and second hands at New Orleans on the 1st September last was 72,200 bags, and the ruling rates for Prime were 10@101c., which was a material advance on previous rates, the average of the previous month being 9c., and both the foreign and the domestic accounts being favorable, prices continued their upward tendency until February, when the market took an unfavorable turn and continued to recede until the latter part of July, since which, under the influence of a greatly diminished stock it has gradually improved, and closed yesterday at 101@111c. for Fair to Prime, against 91@9f on the 15th of July. The stock remaining on hand is 65C0 bags Rio and 2000 mostly Havana.-The following particulars of the crop for the year ending July 1st, we extract from the annual circular issued on that date, by Mr. H. T. LONSDALE, Coffee Broker:

July 1, '51, July 1,'52, July 1, '53,

to July 1,'52. to July 1, '63. to July 1, '64. Imports direct from Rio,...... bags 325,957 351,515 241,778

coastwise of Rio,..... 6 34,821 26,370 29,862 66 direct from Cuba,etc. " 12,562 10,628 11,595

Bags.....

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....... 383,340 381,513 283,235 Decrease of imports at this port this year compared with 1851-52....

..................... bag3 90,105 Increase do do do 1852–3 98,278 Sales Rio Coffee for the year ending July 1st, 1852...... 371,278

1st, 1853...... 322,146 66 66

1st, 1854...... 323,930 Decrease sales for consumption this year compared with 1851-2.........

..................... 47,318 do

do
do

do 1852–3 1,784 Stock of Rio in importers bands... ........ 29,056 66

speculators' hands................ None. “ other descriptions.......

2,500—31,556 Same the last year.......

86,346

Decrease of stock this year.......
Stock on hand July 1st, 1853...........
Arrived during the season direct........

coastwise...........

54,790 81,346 241,778 29,268

352,986 29,056

Taken for consumption.........
Same time previous year.......

323,930 3:22,146

Increase of sales for consumption in 1853 4............... 1,784

Sales and Average Prices of Coffee for Past Year. 1853, July...... 15,597.... 8.75/185, Feb ......38,148....10.70

August.. 10,746.... 8.84 March...51,006....10.24
Sept..... 26,873.... 8.93 April ....51,520.... 9.47
Oct.......12,479....10.86! May .... 87,079.... 9.67
Nov ..... 61,921 ...10.60 June..... 21,573.... 9.22

Dec...... 36,100....11.40 1854, Jan ...... 26,675....10.63

398,736 10.13 Average price of Rio Coffee in 1852-3..

........... 8.95 " " 1851–2...........

8.60 The above sales include the transactions from importer; and speculators' hands, and exceed the sales for consumption by 74,906 bags.

Exports of Coffee to the United States from Rio de Janeiro

from May 1, 1853, to May 1, 1854. To New Orleans......... 211,791 ; To various other ports, 25,002 To New York............ 203,613! To Baltimore........ 190,105 i Total toU.S.in P53-4, 788,043 To Philadelphia ......... 111,792 6 66 52-3,1,066,311 To Boston................ 4,229 66 56 51-2, 907,424 To Charleston ............ 11,451 Decrease ef exports from Rio to U. S. this year compared with 1852-3............

............ 278,268 do

do I do do 1851-2 119,351 Total export from Rio to all parts of the world, from

May 1, 1853, to May 1, 1851........ ......... 1,599,928
May 1, 1852, to May 1, 1853.. ........... 1,968,625

May 1, 1851, to May 1, 1852..... ........... 1,825,779 Estimated stock of Coffee on hand in Rio, May 1, 1854... 60,000 Stock of Coffee on hand at all the importing ports of the

United States is estimated at this day................... 143,000
Same period last year..

..... 230,000

Decrease of stock this year in United States................ 87,000 Sales for consumption in the U. S. in 1851-2............. 815,000

16 1852-3............... 966,000

66 1853-1............. 875,013 Decrease of sales for consumption this year compared with 1852-3.........

90,957 Increase do do do 1851-230,043 Quuantity of Coffee imported into the United States

from all Countries for five years ending June
30th 1853. Compiled from the Registers Re-

port:
For the year ending June 30th, 1819..

11165,331,700 66 1850................ 144,986,895 ob 1851................

152,453,617 1852. .....

193,698,550 1853 ................. 199,089,8:23

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Commercial Aspect of California.—High RENTS,

PRICE OF Flour, Wheat, &c.

Since the year 1819 the productions of California have so much affected the industry and commerce of the nation, that the changes which occur in the financial condition of that State are not less interesting to the States east of the Rocky Mountains, than those which may take place in Great Britain and all Europe combined. Hence no sound estimate can be made of the commercial and financial prospects of the country at large without a correct knowledge of the industry, productions and commerce of California.

Great as the productions of California have been and yet are, they cannot long continue to support the spirit of speculation which they have excited in every part of the country. It is fair to conclude that the production of gold has reached its maximum, and it now remains to be tested whether the prices of labor and property, the excessive trading in merchandize, and the prosecution of our immence projects of public improvements can be sustained, even though there should be no material decline in the production of gold.

We copy the following articles on the “Existing Commercial Depression,” “Iligh Rent,” &c. from the Placer Times and Transcript of 1st inst. And in connection with this subject it affords us pleasure to remark that, the commercial and financial articles of the Placer Times and Transcript are uniformly disting. uished by a degree of ability and honesty of purpose which we have

TIIE EXISTING COMMERCIAL DEPRESSION. Though we have so often referred to the discouraging aspect of mercantile affairs during a period of many consecutive months, at no time, perhaps within a year past, have business prospects looked more gloomy than at present. It is plain to the most casual observer that this state of things arises, not so much from a decreased rate of consumption of merchandise, but is mainly attributable to large and inordinate supplies, and a greatly increased number of persons engaged in mercantile pursuits.

It is useless to look forwari to better times while at least one.' sixth of the entire population of the State is engaged in trade, and controlling a quantity of goods adequate to the wants of our population for a ye ir to come. That prices renumerative either. to the shipper or trader, could exist under such circumstances, is impossible. Low prices must rule, until both are convinced that fewer goods and fewer dealers are sufficient to meet the require. ments of the country.

Experience, in many instances entailing ruin, must alone teach what reason and argument have failed to do. The lucrativeness of trade in California was once a reality. But it has ceased to be so, and yet the realization of the truth scems difficult to those whom it most concerns. Shipments continue to be made to this port with the same zest that marked previous and paying enter

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