The Complete Angler: Or, Contemplative Man's Recreation, Being a Discourse on Rivers, Fishponds, Fish, and Fishing. With Notes Biographical and Explanatory, and the Lives of the Authors

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Henry Washbourne, 1842 - 396 Seiten

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Inhalt

I
II
i
IV
lvii
V
lxxv
IX
43
X
61
XI
76
XII
121
XXIV
195
XXV
204
XXVII
217
XXVIII
222
XXIX
227
XXX
232
XXXI
257
XXXII
267

XIII
124
XIV
133
XV
148
XVI
158
XVII
167
XVIII
170
XX
176
XXI
185
XXII
191
XXXIII
278
XXXIV
284
XXXV
286
XXXVI
305
XXXVII
321
XXXVIII
330
XXXIX
332
XL
336
XLI
344

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Seite 104 - Sweet Day, so cool, so calm, so bright, The bridal of the earth and sky, The dew shall weep thy fall to-night ; For thou must die. Sweet Rose, whose hue, angry and brave, Bids the rash gazer wipe his eye, Thy root is ever in its grave, And thou must die.
Seite 6 - Lord, what music hast thou provided for the saints in heaven, when thou affordest bad men such music on earth...
Seite xxxi - Who God doth late and early pray. More of his grace than gifts to lend, And entertains the harmless day With a religious book, or friend; - This man is freed from servile bands Of hope to rise, or fear to fall; Lord of himself, though not of lands; And having nothing, yet hath all.
Seite 110 - Courts, I would rejoice ; Or, with my Bryan and a book, Loiter long days near Shawford brook ; There sit by him, and eat my meat ; There see the sun both rise and set ; There bid good morning to next day ; There meditate my time away ; And angle on, and beg to have A quiet passage to a welcome grave.
Seite 70 - I know it now, I learned the first part in my golden age, when I was about the age of my poor daughter ; and the latter part, which indeed fits me best now, but two or three years ago, when the cares of the world began to take hold of me : but you shall, God willing, hear them both, and sung as well as we can, for we both love anglers. Come, Maudlin, sing the first part to the gentlemen with a merry heart, and I'll sing the second when you have done. " THE MILK-MAID'S SONG. Come live with me, and...
Seite 73 - With coral clasps and amber studs, And if these pleasures may thee move, Come live with me, and be my love.
Seite 239 - Therefore be sure you look to that. And, in the next place, look to your health, and if you have it, praise God, and value it next to a good conscience; for health is the second blessing that we mortals are capable of — a blessing that money cannot buy — and therefore value it, and be thankful for it.
Seite xxxi - HOW happy is he born and taught That serveth not another's will; Whose armour is his honest thought, And simple truth his utmost skill...
Seite 244 - Farewell, ye honour'd rags, ye glorious bubbles; Fame's but a hollow echo ; Gold, pure clay ; Honour the darling but of one short day...
Seite 74 - A honey tongue, a heart of gall, Is fancy's spring, but sorrow's fall. Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses, Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies, Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten: In folly ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw and ivy buds, Thy coral clasps and amber studs, All these in me no means can move To come to thee, and be thy love.

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