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SPEECH DELIvERED IN CoNGREsson HIs AP-
PoinTMENT As CoMMANDER-IN-CHIEF . 117

FAREwell ADDREss To THE Contine:NTAL

ARMY. . . . . . . . . . 119 Finst INAUGURAL ADDREss . . . . 129 SEcond INAUGURAL ADDREss . . . . 138 FAREwell. AddRE88 to THE PEoPLE of THE UNITED STATEs . . . . . 139 HENRY LEE FUNERAL ORATION on WASHINGTON . . 177

JOHN C, CALHOUN (Portrait)
SPEECH on Foreign RELATIONs . . . 197

SPEECH on THE RECEPTION of Abolition
PETITIONs . . . . . . . . 221

Sprinch on THE SUBJECT or SLAVERY . . 237

PREFACE

In compiling these volumes the task has been one of determining what to exclude; for the small space afforded might easily have been completely filled by the notable speeches of any one of a half dozen Southern orators of renown. The same has been true also in regard to the choice of men from whose work selections should be made.

The aim has been to give representative examples of the work of the most widely known statesmen and publicists of the South—those who had the greatest influence in the establishment and development of the Union, those who with admirable conviction ably supported the Confederacy and those who later rendered the greatest possible service in the upbuilding of the South after a devastating war had done its work of destruction and disintegration.

Some names of those not known best as orators have been chosen, and extracts from short addresses given. We may instance General Lee and General Washington. These men were not primarily public speakers—their work was in another field —but the reader will detect in the passages printed the highest degree of eloquence—that quality that can be the possession of none but the brave and true and Supremely great. That these volumes may aid in the further preservation of the speeches therein contained; be a joy to the present generation that gratefully and admiringly remembers the service of everyone whose words are given; and inculcate in the minds of the rising and of succeeding generations that knowledge of and reverence for these great men whose lives were spent freely and unselfishly that these might live more abundantly, is the sincere wish of

THE PUBLISHER.

ELOQUENT SONS
OF THE SOUTH

CHRONOLOGY

PATRICK HENRY was born May 29, 1736, at Studley, Hanover County, Virginia. Son of John Henry, Scotch, and Sarah Winston, English. Up to the age of twenty-four attempted keeping a country store and farming, at both of which pursuits he failed. Was married in the fall of 1754, at the age of eighteen, to Sarah Shelton. Admitted to the Bar in 1760. Entered the Virginia House of Burgesses, 1765. Was associated with Thomas Jefferson, Richard Henry Lee, and Dabney Carr in procuring the establishment of a committee of correspondence for intercourse with the other colonies. In 1744, a prominent member of the Continental Congross. In 1775, a leader in the Virginia Convention. Governor of Virginia 1776–79, 1784–86. In 1788 was a member of the Ratifying Convention of Virginia, where he acted with the Anti-Federalists. Subsequently declined a seat in the Senate, 1794, the Portfolio of State offered by Washington, 1795, an appointment as Judge in the Supreme Court, and other offices. Died at Red Hill, Charlotte County, Virginia. June 6, 1799. t

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