The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction

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J. Limbird, 1848
Containing original essays; historical narratives, biographical memoirs, sketches of society, topographical descriptions, novels and tales, anecdotes, select extracts from new and expensive works, the spirit of the public journals, discoveries in the arts and sciences, useful domestic hints, etc. etc. etc.

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Seite 158 - Neither a borrower nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
Seite 160 - Now cracks a noble heart. Good night, sweet prince ; And flights of angels sing thee to thy rest ! Why does the drum come hither ? [March within.
Seite 159 - Hath seal'd thee for herself; for thou hast been <» As one, in suffering all, that suffers nothing, A man that fortune's buffets and rewards Hath ta'en with equal thanks : and blest are those Whose blood and judgment are so well commingled That they are not a pipe for Fortune's finger To sound what stop she please.
Seite 56 - For the creature was made subject to vanity, not willingly, but by reason of Him who hath subjected the same in hope ; Because the creature itself also shall be delivered from the bondage of corruption into the glorious liberty of the children of God.
Seite 310 - Neither do they which go by say, The blessing of the LORD be upon you: we bless you in the name of the LORD.
Seite 322 - Who flagged upon Bochastle's heath, Who shunned to stem the flooded Teith, For twice that day from shore to shore The gallant stag swam stoutly o'er. Few were the stragglers, following far, That reached the lake of Vennachar; And when the Brigg of Turk was won, The headmost horseman rode alone.
Seite 156 - We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; For he, to-day that sheds his blood with me, Shall be my brother ; be he ne'er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition: And gentlemen in England, now a-bed, Shall think themselves accurs'd, they were not here; And hold their manhoods cheap, while any speaks, That fought with us upon saint Crispin's day.
Seite 132 - Philip thought (as many have thought before and since) that he had a right to do what he pleased with his own.
Seite 235 - ... called wheaten flour, which the cooks do mingle with water, eggs, spice, and other tragical, magical enchantments, and then they put it by little and little into a frying-pan of boiling suet, where it makes a confused dismal hissing (like the...
Seite 159 - That they are not a pipe for fortune's finger To sound what stop she please. Give me that man That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart, As I do thee.

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