Aims and ideals of representative American painters

Cover
The Macmillan co., 1901 - 114 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 53 - Art should be independent of all clap-trap — should stand alone, and appeal to the artistic sense of eye or ear, without confounding this with emotions entirely foreign to it, as devotion, pity, love, patriotism and the like.
Seite 62 - The one aim of the unsuspecting painter is to make his man " stand out " from the frame — never doubting that, on the contrary, he should really, and, in truth, absolutely does, stand within the frame — and at a depth behind it, equal to the distance at which the painter sees his model. ' The frame is, indeed, the window through which the painter looks at his model, and nothing could be more offensively inartistic than this brutal attempt to thrust the model on the hitherside of this window.
Seite 61 - The work of the master reeks not of the sweat of the brow - suggests no effort - and is finished from its beginning...
Seite 62 - ... stand out" from the frame — never doubting that, on the contrary, he should, and in truth absolutely does, stand within the frame — and at a depth behind it equal to the distance at which the painter sees his model. The frame is, indeed, the window through which the painter looks at his model, and nothing could be more offensively inartistic than this brutal attempt to thrust the model on the hither-side of this window 1 ' Here, as always, it was the just limit of things which Whistler perceived...
Seite 27 - To suppose that it is fidelity to an original to give its matter, unless you at the same time give its manner; or, rather, to suppose that you can really give its matter at all, unless you can give its manner, is just the mistake of our pre-Raphaelite school of painters, who do not understand that the peculiar effect of nature resides in the whole and not in the parts.
Seite 20 - Such an attitude of mind cuts one off from growth and development, for it is as much as to say : " I am very well satisfied with myself and quite indifferent to the experiences and feelings...
Seite 93 - Harper's article, the work is described thus: "ln the background ]is] a framed picture within a picture, the painted gold of the frame of the pictured picture coming very close to the actual gold of the actual picture, while in the figure [there is] at once action and repose, and between the figure in the foreground and the picture in the background a definite sense of distance
Seite 55 - Mr. Whistler's art has educated the younger generation to a new perception of beauty. In his wonderful nocturnes he has fixed on canvas the blue transparent darkness of the night as it envelops the city and is reflected in the gas-lit river — the darkness through which you descry the dim forms of tall bridges and phantom bbats, of illusive spires and dream-like palaces.
Seite 35 - Saint-Gaudens was a member of the National Academy of Design and one of the...
Seite 56 - ... Mr. Whistler's nights are the blue transparent darknesses which are half of the world's life. Sometimes he foregoes even the aid of earthly light, and his picture is but luminous blue shadow, delicately graduated, as in the nocturne in M. Duret's collection — purple above and below, a shadow in the middle of the picture — a little less and there would be nothing.

Bibliografische Informationen