The World's Best Essays, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Band 5

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David Josiah Brewer
Kaiser, 1900
 

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Seite 1889 - It was at Rome, on the 15th of October 1764, as I sat musing amidst the ruins of the Capitol, while the barefooted friars were singing vespers in the temple of Jupiter,* that the idea of writing the decline and fall of the city first started to my mind.
Seite 1883 - Subtle as Sphinx; as sweet and musical As bright Apollo's lute, strung with his hair; And, when Love speaks, the voice of all the gods Makes heaven drowsy with the harmony. Never durst poet touch a pen to write, Until his ink were temper'd with Love's sighs; O, then his lines would ravish savage ears, And plant in tyrants mild humility.
Seite 1775 - Business; but to these we must add Frugality, if we would make our Industry more certainly successful. A Man may, if he knows not how to save as he gets, keep his Nose all his Life to the Grindstone, and die not worth a Groat at last. A fat Kitchen makes a lean Will, as Poor Richard says; and Many Estates are spent in the Getting, Since Women for Tea forsook Spinning and Knitting, And Men for Punch forsook Hewing and Splitting.
Seite 2001 - I came into the House one morning, well clad, and perceived a gentleman speaking whom I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled ; for it was a plain cloth suit which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor ; his linen was plain, and not very clean, and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his little band, which was not much larger than his collar ; his hat was without a hatband ; his stature was of a good size ; his sword stuck close to his side ; his countenance swollen and reddish ; his...
Seite 1809 - One lesson, and only one, history may be said to repeat with distinctness: that the world is built somehow on moral foundations; that, in the long run, it is well with the good; in the long run, it is ill with the wicked.
Seite 1775 - He means, that perhaps the cheapness is apparent only, and not real ; or the bargain, by straitening thee in thy business, may do thee more harm than good. For in another place he says, Many have been ruined by buying good pennyworths.
Seite 1774 - For want of a nail, the shoe was lost, For want of a shoe, the horse was lost, For want of a horse, the rider was lost, For want of a rider, the battle was lost.
Seite 1816 - But for those first affections, Those shadowy recollections, Which, be they what they may, Are yet the fountain-light of all our day, Are yet a master light of all our seeing; Uphold us, cherish, and have power to make Our noisy years seem moments in the being Of the eternal silence...
Seite 2006 - I can say this of Naseby: that when I saw the enemy draw up and march in gallant order towards us, and we a company of poor ignorant men, to seek how to order our battle (the General having commanded me to order all the Horse), I could not (riding alone about my business) but smile out to God in praises, in assurance of victory, because God would, by things that are not, bring to naught things that are. Of which I had great assurance. And God did it.
Seite 1783 - I saw one too ambitious of court favor, sacrificing his time in attendance on levees, his repose, his liberty, his virtue, and perhaps his friends, to attain it, I have said to myself, This man gives too much for his whistle.

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