The Extraordinary Black Book: An Exposition of Abuses in Church and State, Courts of Law, Representation, Municipal and Corporate Bodies : with a Precis of the House of Commons, Past, Present, and to Come

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The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 2004 - 683 Seiten
Wade, John, [Compiler and Editor]. The Extraordinary Black Book: An Exposition of Abuses in Church and State, Courts of Law, Representation, Municipal and Corporate Bodies; With a Precis of the House of Commons, Past, Present, and to Come. A New Edition, Greatly Enlarged and Corrected to the Present Time, by the Original Editor. London: Published by Effingham Wilson, 1832. xxxii, 683 pp. Reprinted 2004 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. LCCN 2003052768. ISBN 1-58477-362-6. Cloth. $125. * Reprint of the final revised and expanded edition. Especially significant because it had a direct influence on legislation, this "Bible of the Reformers" is a model of investigatory pamphleteering in the cause of representative democracy. The long struggle to transform Great Britain into a modern state was effected primarily through the gradual expansion of the electorate, which was accomplished though the Reform Acts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In the earlier era, as the growth of industry shook the traditional agrarian economy dominated by the landholding aristocracy, the accompanying campaign to transform government by weaning power from traditional loci was conducted through a mass of books, pamphlets and other printed matter. The Extraordinary Black Book, which went through several editions between 1820 and 1832, was the most important of these. As the editor explained: "government has been a corporation, and had the same interests and the same principles of action as monopolists. It has been supported by other corporations; the Church has been one, the Agriculturists another, the Boroughs a third, the East-India Company a fourth, and the Bank of England a fifth: all these, and interests like these, constituted the citadel and out-works of its strength, and the first object of each has been to shun investigation. We have, however, rent the vail..." (Advertisement to the New Edition, iv-v). Printing and the Mind of Man calls this "a massive compendium of all the abuses, electoral, ecclesiastical, legal which they sought to abolish" 1967:180.
 

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Inhalt

Objects of the parliamentary wars waged since 1688
335
Conclusions on disastrous policy of the Boroughgovernment
342
Annual charge entailed on the country by the war of 1793
348
Deadweightannuity project
354
Examination of question on violation of national faith
360
TAXATION AND GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURE
366
The great exchequer job
373
Expenditure of the Coloniesutility of
379

Lectureships public charities surplice fees new churches
48
Impositions practised in repect of poor livings
55
Comparative cost of Church of England and other churches
63
True policy of the church expounded
70
Defects in the book of Common Prayer
76
Dissenters like Roman slaves never numbered
79
Tabular statement of religious denominations in England
85
Rights of layimpropriators examined
91
Valuation of Sees and Dignities in the Kings Book
131
CHAPTER III
137
Wealth bequeathed to their families by the bishops
142
Statement of sums to be paid in lieu of tithes in several parishes
148
Estimate of the revenues of the Protestant establishment
154
Nonresidence of bishops and parochial clergy
160
Proportion of Roman Catholics and Protestants
166
Return of promotions in the Irish church
172
Crisis of the Irish church at the close of 1831
179
Origin and history of the crown lands
186
Amount and appropriation of landed revenues
192
Estimate of the value of crown lands
195
Pourandahalf per cent Leeward Island duties
203
Statement of produce of hereditary revenues of the crown
210
Publication of the court pensionlist
216
Total expenditure from accession of Geo III to the death of
225
Peculiar death of Geo IV and his chief counsellors
234
PRIVY COUNCILDIPLOMATIC MISSIONSAND
244
Consular establishments
250
Clergy lords and commons deviated from original objects of their
258
Incomes of landed interest the legitimate fund for taxation
265
Incomes of the aristocracy
271
Different classes of society and their respective incomes
277
Votes of the lords on Reform Bill
283
LAW AND COURTS OF
286
Causes of the multiplication of statutes
293
Debtor laws chief source of litigation and legal emoluments
299
Different laws for different persons
305
Insecurity of titles to estates
312
Oppressions under the exciselaws
321
Official returns illustrative of law and courts of law
329
WORKINGS OF TAXATION
385
Irresponsible power of the Times newspaper
391
Origin and progress of the Company
395
Indian wars and territorial acquisitions
401
Territorial revenues of India
412
Thoughts on the renewal of the Companys charter
418
Extravagant expenditure of Company and necessity of retrench
424
Origin and progress of the Bank
430
Mischiefs of irresponsible power of Bank over the circulation
436
Directors have not acted on sound principles of banking
442
Annual sums payable to the Bank by the public
448
Origin of corporations guilds and fraternities
454
Management and revenues of companies of the City of London
460
Corporation of Bristol
467
Corporation of Leeds
474
Sinecures reversions and pensions
484
Infamous pensionact of 57 Geo Ill
490
Salaries and pensions exceeding 1000
497
Principles on which government has been carried on by Tory admi
503
Alphabetic list of placemen pensioners sinecurists
505
Addendum to Place and Pension list
589
Revolution of 1688 did not concede to the industrious orders their
595
Principles which ought to determine the elective qualification
601
Constitutional changes valueless in themselves
606
Population houses c of boroughs not disfranchised
612
Number of parliaments held in each reign
621
APPENDIX
627
Return of cities and towns with a population exceeding
636
Returns of Army and Navy halfpay and retired allowances
640
Number of public creditors and amount of their dividends
642
Population free and slaves imports and exports of the Colonies
643
House of Lords origin and character of
644
Borough lords and their Representatives
647
Ecclesiastical Patronage of each of the Nobility and the value of Rectories and Vicarages in their gift
650
Return of the amount of church rates county rates and high way rates c in each county of England and Wales
668
Return of lay and clerical magistrates
669
Commissioners of sewers institution of and abuses in their administration
670
Progress of Population in Great Britain
672
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Seite 2 - The various modes of worship, which prevailed in the Roman world, were all considered by the people, as equally true; by the philosopher, as equally false; and by the magistrate, as equally useful.
Seite 9 - By education most have been misled; So they believe, because they so were bred. The priest continues what the nurse began, And thus the child imposes on the man.

Über den Autor (2004)

John E. Wade II is an author, investor, philanthropist, and founder of the nonprofit organization Soldiers of Love. An active member of his church and civic organizations in his area, Wade holds an M.A. from the University of Georgia and has worked in a range of fields. His extensive travels, including visits to China, India, Egypt, Israel, Syria, Jordan, and Brazil, inspired him to collect the essays in this work. Wade lives in New Orleans, Louisiana.

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