The History of England from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Abdication of James the Second, 1688, Band 1

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Phillips, Sampson, 1851

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Seite ix - Strafford ; and after the first ebullitions of their fury were over, what was, still more mortifying, the book seemed to sink into oblivion. Mr. Millar told me, that in a twelvemonth he sold only forty-five copies of it. I scarcely indeed heard of one man in the three kingdoms, considerable for rank or letters, that could endure the book.
Seite v - After passing three years very agreeably in that country, I came over to London in 1737. In the end of 1738, I...
Seite xxi - Upon the whole, I have always considered him, both in his lifetime and since his death, as approaching as nearly to the idea of a perfectly wise and virtuous man, as perhaps the nature of human frailty will permit.
Seite 431 - ... ancient custom: the goods of every freeman shall be disposed of according to his will: if he die intestate, his heirs shall succeed to them. No officer of the crown shall take any horses, carts, or wood, without the consent of the owner. The king's courts of justice shall be stationary, and shall no longer follow his person: they shall be open to every one; and justice shall no longer be sold, refused, or delayed by them.
Seite 7 - Suetonius in a great and decisive oattle, where eighty thousand of the Britons are said to have perished ; and Boadicea herself, rather than fall into the hands of the enraged victor, put an end to her own life by poison...
Seite vii - In 1751, I removed from the country to the town, the true scene for a man of letters. In 1752, were published at Edinburgh, where I then lived, my Political Discourses, the only work of mine that was successful on the first publication.
Seite xiii - I was, I say, a man of mild dispositions, of command of temper, of an open, social, and cheerful humour, capable of attachment, but little susceptible of enmity, and of great moderation in all my passions. Even my love of literary fame, my ruling passion, never soured my temper, notwithstanding my frequent disappointments.
Seite 97 - ... by the industrious policy of Edgar. He took great pains in hunting and pursuing those ravenous animals ; and when he found that all that escaped him had taken shelter in the mountains and forests of Wales, he changed the tribute of money imposed on the Welsh princes by Athelstan, his predecessor", into an annual tribute of three hundred heads of wolves ; which produced such diligence in hunting them, that the animal has been no more seen in this island.
Seite xxi - His constant pleasantry was the genuine effusion of good-nature and good-humour, tempered with delicacy and modesty, and without even the slightest tincture of malignity, so frequently the disagreeable source of what is called wit in other men. It never was the meaning of his raillery to mortify ; and therefore, far from offending, it seldom failed to please and delight even those who were the objects of it. To his friends, who were frequently the objects of it, there was not perhaps one of all his...
Seite 63 - He remarked the supine security of the Danes, their contempt of the English, their negligence in foraging and plundering, and their dissolute wasting of what they gained by rapine and violence. Encouraged by these...

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