The Natural History of the Human Teeth: Explaining Their Structure, Use, Formation, Growth, and Diseases, Bände 1-2

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R. Hardwicke, 1865 - 253 Seiten
 

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Seite 159 - The importance of the Teeth is such, that they deserve our utmost attention, as well with regard to the preservation of them when in a healthy state, as to the methods of curing them when diseased. They require this attention, not only for the preservation of themselves...
Seite 8 - The Alveolar Processes of both Jaws should rather be considered as belonging to the Teeth, than as parts of the Jaws ; for they begin to be formed with the Teeth, keep pace with them in their growth, and decay, and entirely disappear, when the Teeth fall ; so that, if we had no Teeth, it is likely we should not only have no sockets, but not even these processes, in which the sockets...
Seite 11 - ... farther, we shall find that these two lines are so nearly parallel, that the condyle moves almost directly forwards in passing from the cavity to the eminence ; and the parallelism of the motion is also preserved by the shape of an intermediate cartilage. " In this joint there is a moveable cartilage, which, though common to both condyle and cavity, ought to be considered rather as an appendage of the former than of the latter, being more closely connected with it, so as to accompany it in its...
Seite 248 - ... arising from Dentition. When it takes place in the upper jaw, the Tooth is often obliged to grow backwards ; and in such a position it sometimes presses on the interior edge of the coronoide process, in shutting the mouth, and gives great pain. When it takes place in the lower jaw, some part of the Tooth continues to lie hid under that process, and covered by the soft parts which are always liable to be squeezed between that Tooth and the corresponding Tooth in the upper jaw. To open very freely,...
Seite 179 - ... matter ; therefore the stopping up the cavity becomes, in many cases, the means of preventing future attacks of the inflammation, and often retards even the progress of the disease, that is, the farther decay of the tooth, so that many people go on for years thus assisted : but it is a method which must be put in practice early, otherwise it cannot be continued long ; for, if the disease has done considerable damage to the inside of the tooth, so as to have weakened it much, the whole body of...
Seite 127 - I never saw an instance of this kind but once, and there two fore Teeth shot up in the Lower Jaw. I should suppose that a new Alveolar Process must be also formed in such cases, in the same manner as in the production of the first and second sets of Teeth. From what I can learn, the age at which this happens is generally about seventy. From this circumstance, and another that sometimes happens to women at this age, it would appear that there is some effort in nature to renew the body at that period.
Seite 183 - From its attacking certain teeth rather than others, in the same head, and a particular part of the tooth, I suspect it to be an original disease of the tooth itself, and not to depend upon accident, way of life, -constitution, or any particular management of the teeth.
Seite 198 - ... the antrum, so that the matter may be discharged for the future that way. 'But if the fore part of the bone has been destroyed, an opening may be made on the inside of the lip, where the abscess most probably will be felt ; but this will be more apt than the other perforation to heal, and thereby may occasion a new accumulation ; which is to be avoided, if possible, by putting in practice all the common methods of preventing openings from healing or closing up ; but this practice will rather...
Seite 215 - Orthodontic of the second ; and as these last often occupy a much larger space than the first, in such cases the second set are obliged to stand irregularly. This happens much oftener in the upper jaw, than in the lower, because, the difference of the size of the two sets is much greater in that jaw. This irregularity is observed almost solely in the incisors and cuspidati ; for they are the only teeth which are larger than their predecessors. It most frequently happens to the cuspidati, because...
Seite 154 - It would be best of all to attempt the extraction of a Tooth by drawing it in the direction of its axis : but that not being practicable by the instruments at present in use, which pull laterally, it is the next best to draw a Tooth to that side where the Alveolar Process is weakest ; which is the inside, in the two last grinders on each side of the Lower-Jaw, and the outside in all the others.

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