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CORRESPONDENCE,

PART SECOND;

COMPRISING

LETTERS, PRIVATE AND OFFICIAL,

FROM

THE TIME OF THE AUTHOR'S FIRST MISSION TO ENGLAND

TO

THE BEGINNING OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION.

1757-1775.

(CONTINUED)

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I have written two or three small letters to you since my return from Ireland and Scotland. Mr. Todd has not yet shown me that, which you wrote to him about the New Colony, though he mentioned it, and will let me see it, I suppose, when I call on him.* I told you in one of mine, that he has advanced for your share what has been paid by others, though I was ready to do it, and shall in the whole affair take the same care of your interest as of my own.

You take notice, that "Mr. Wharton's friends will not allow me any merit in this transaction, but insist the whole is owing to his superior abilities." It is a common error in friends, when they would extol their friend, to make comparisons, and to depreciate the merits of others. It was not necessary for his friends to do so in this case. Mr. Wharton will in truth have a good deal of merit in the affair if it succeeds, he having been exceedingly active and industrious in

* See the particulars about this New Colony, Vol. IV. pp. 233, 302. VOL. VIII. 1

soliciting it, and in drawing up memorials and papers to support the application and remove objections. But, though I have not been equally active, it not being thought proper, that I should appear much in the solicitation, since I became a little obnoxious to the ministry, on account of my letters to America, yet I suppose my advice may have been thought of some use, since it has been asked on every step, and I believe, that, being longer and better known here than Mr. Wharton, I may have lent some weight to his negotiations by joining in the affair, from the greater confidence men are apt to place in one they know, than in a stranger. However, as I neither ask nor expect any particular consideration for any service I may have done, and only think I ought to escape censure, I shall not enlarge on this invidious topic.

Let us all do our endeavours, in our several capacities, for the common service; and, if one has the ability or opportunity of doing more for his friends than another, let him think that a happiness, and be satisfied. The business is not yet quite completed; and, as many things may happen between the cup and the lip, perhaps there may be nothing of this kind for friends to dispute about. For, if nobody should receive any benefit, there would be no scrambling for the honor.

In yours from New York, of July 3d, you mentioned your intention of purchasing a bill to send hither, as soon as you returned home from your journey. I have not since received any from you, which I only take notice of, that, if you have sent any, you may not blame me for not acknowledging the receipt of it.

In mine of April 20th, I explained to you what I had before mentioned, that, in settling our private accounts, I had paid you the sum of three hundred

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