Porcupine's Works: Containing Various Writings and Selections, Exhibiting a Faithful Picture of the United States of America; of Their Government, Laws, Politics and Resources; of the Characters of Their Presidents, Governors, Legislators, Magistrates, and Military Men; and of the Customs, Manners, Morals, Religion, Virtues and Vices of the People: Comprising Also a Complete Series of Historical Documents and Remarks, from the End of the War, in 1783, to the Election of the President, in March, 1801, Band 9

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Cobbett and Morgan, 1801
 

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Seite 394 - For who maketh thee to differ from another ? and what hast thou that thou didst not receive? now if thou didst receive it, why dost thou glory, as if thou hadst not received it?
Seite 62 - Hidalgo, and the said article and the thirty-third article of the treaty of Amity, commerce, and navigation...
Seite 59 - ... abundant cause of gratitude to the source of benevolence and influence for interior tranquillity and personal security, for propitious seasons, prosperous agriculture, productive fisheries, and general improvements, and, above all, for a rational spirit of civil and religious liberty and a calm but steady determination to support our sovereignty, as well as our moral and our religious principles, against all open and secret attacks.
Seite 125 - July 7, 1798, declares the treaties as no longer " legally obligatory;" but if war existed such an act would have been superfluous. The act of July 16, 1798, authorizes augmentation oí the army "for and during the continuance of the existing differences between the United States and the French Republic.
Seite 65 - The consequences arising from the continual accumulation of public debts in other countries, ought to admonish us to be careful to prevent their growth in our own. The national defence must be provided for as well as the support of government, but both should be accomplished as much as possible by immediate taxes, and as little as possible by loans.
Seite 104 - Perhaps, said he, you believe that, in returning and exposing to your countrymen the unreasonableness of the demands of this Government, you will unite them ,in your resistance to those demands: you are mistaken; you ought to know that the diplomatic skill of France, and the means she possesses in your country, are sufficient to enable her, with the French party in America, to throw the blame which will attend the rupture of the negotiations on the Federalists, as you term yourselves, but on the...
Seite 63 - Several decisions on the claims of the citizens of the United States for losses and damages sustained by reason of irregular and illegal captures or condemnations of their vessels or other property, have been made by the commissioners in London, conformably to the seventh article of the treaty. The sums awarded by the commissioners have been paid by the British government; a considerable number of other claims, where costs and damages, and not captured property, were the only objects in question,...
Seite 60 - The commerce of the United States is essential, if not to their existence, at least to their comfort, their growth, prosperity, and happiness.
Seite 63 - May last, to examine the claims of British subjects for debts contracted before the peace, and still remaining due to them from citizens or inhabitants of the United States. Various causes have hitherto prevented any determinations, but the business is now resumed and doubtless will be prosecuted without interruption. Several decisions on the claims of the citizens of the United States for losses and...
Seite 63 - In order to terminate all differences on account of the losses sustained by the citizens of the United States in consequence of their vessels and cargoes having been taken by the subjects of his Catholic Majesty, during the late war between Spain and France...

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