A father's gift to his son, on his becoming an apprentice: to which is added Dr. Franklin's Way to wealth

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Wood, 1821 - 140 Seiten
 

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Seite 107 - He that hath a trade hath an estate; and He that hath a calling hath an office of profit and honor, as Poor Richard says; but then the trade must be worked at, and the calling well followed, or neither the estate nor the office will enable us to pay our taxes. If we are industrious, we shall never starve; for, At the workingman's house hunger looks in, but dares not enter.
Seite 127 - ... the blessing of Heaven ; and, therefore, ask that blessing humbly, and be not uncharitable to those that at present seem to want it, but comfort and help them. Remember, Job suffered, and was afterwards prosperous. " And now, to conclude, Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other...
Seite 113 - Master will do more Work than both his Hands; and again, Want of Care does us more Damage than want of Knowledge; and again, Not to oversee Workmen is to leave them your Purse open. Trusting too much to others...
Seite 106 - Industry all easy, as Poor Richard says; and He that riseth late must trot all Day, and shall scarce overtake his Business at Night; while Laziness travels so slowly, that Poverty soon overtakes him...
Seite 125 - ... creditors, Poor Richard tells us, have better memories than debtors; and in another place says, creditors are a superstitious sect, great observers of set days and times. The day comes round before you are aware, and the demand is made before you are prepared to satisfy it; or if you bear your debt in mind, the term which at first seemed so long, will, as it lessens, appear extremely short. Time will seem to have added wings to his heels, as well as shoulders. Those have a short Lent, saith Poor...
Seite 108 - One today is worth two tomorrows, as Poor Richard says; and further, Never leave that till tomorrow, which you can do today. If you were a servant, would you not be ashamed that a good master should catch you idle? Are you then your own master? Be ashamed to catch yourself idle...
Seite 120 - And again, Pride is as loud a beggar as want, and a great deal more saucy. When you have bought one fine thing, you must buy ten more, that your appearance may be all of a piece; but Poor Dick says, 'Tis easier to suppress the first desire than to satisfy all that follow it.
Seite 129 - I resolved to be the better for the echo of it, and though I had at first determined to buy stuff for a new coat, I went away resolved to wear my old one a little longer. Reader, if thou wilt do the same, thy profit will be as great as mine.
Seite 110 - Methinks I hear some of you say, " Must a man afford himself no leisure ? " I will tell thee, my friend, what Poor Richard says, Employ thy time well, if thou meanest to gain leisure ; and Since thou art not sure of a minute, throw not away an hour...
Seite 122 - We are offered by the terms of this sale six months' credit; and that perhaps has induced some of us to attend it, because we cannot spare the ready money, and hope now to be fine without it. But ah! think what you do when you run in debt: you give to another power over your liberty. If you cannot pay at the time, you will be ashamed to see your creditor; you will be in fear when you speak to him; you will make poor, pitiful, sneaking excuses, and by degrees come to lose your veracity and sink into...

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