Mental Science: A Compendium of Psychology and the History of Philosophy ...

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D. Appleton and Company, 1882
 

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Inhalt

Thirst Inanition arrested circulation good and ill health
32
Association has a share in the Moral Sentiment
39
SENSE OF TOUCH
43
Maps Diagrams and Pictorial Representations
45
Language includes fixed trains of words
51
Objects of Hearingmaterial bodies in a state of tremor
52
Knowledge as Science is clothed in artificial symbols
57
Fine Art constructions give refined pleasure
63
THE APPETITES
67
Muscles of the Body generally
73
Law of Selfconservation
79
Influence of association in Fine Art Alisons Theory
85
6
87
The complex current of each ones existence
124
SIMILARITY IN DIVERSITYSENSATIONS
130
Sight Colours Forms and their combinations
136
REASONING AND SCIENCE IN GENERAL
143
Organic Life unknown forms of pleasure and pain The higher
166
Emotional
172
The only generality having separate existence is the Name
179
Objects of Sight
190
Energy as opposed to Passive Feeling
198
BOOK I
215
THE INTERPRETATION AND ESTIMATE OF FEELING
221
EMOTION OF TERROR
232
the sources of Courage
238
SPECIES OF THE TENDER EMOTION
243
EMOTIONS OF SELF
250
manifestations in the Lower Animals forms
266
Chance or Uncertainty contributes to the engrossment
269
The excitement of Pursuit is seen in the Lower Animals
270
Contests ib 8 The occupations of Industry give scope for Plotinterest
271
The search after Knowledge
272
Form of pain the prolongation of the suspense
273
Pleasures and pains attending Intellectual operations ib 2 Feelings in the working of Contiguity
274
New identities of Science inercase the range of intellectual comprehension
275
Discoveries of Practice gives the pleasure of increased power ib 7 Illustrative Comparisons remit intellectual toil
276
SYMPATHIY is entering into and acting out the feelings of others id
277
Circumstances favouring Sympathy
278
Completion of Sympathyvicarious action
279
Sympathy with pleasure and pain
280
Sympathy supports mens feelings and opinions ib 8 Moulding of mens sentiments and views ih 9 Sympathy an indirect source of pleasure to the gym...
281
IDEAL EMOTION 1 The persistence of Feeling makes the life in the Ideal
283
Ideal Emotion is affected by Organic states
284
Some Constitutions are adapted for Special Emotions
285
The Eye and the Ear are the asthetic senses
291
Complex Harmonies
298
Association of movements with the idea of the Effect to be pro duced
337
CONTROL OF FEELINGS AND THOUGHTS 1 All voluntary control is through the muscles
338
CONTROL OF THE FEELINGS 2 The power of the Will confined to the muscular accompaniments
339
The voluntary command of the muscles is adequate to suppress the movements under emotion
340
COMMAND OF THE THOUGHTS 4 The medium is the control of Attention
341
The will has power over muscular movements in idea
342
Command of the thoughts may be acquired ib 7 Enters into Constructive Association 313
343
Command of the Thoughts a means of controlling the Feelings
344
Power of the Feelings to influence the Thoughts
345
MOTIVES OR ENDS 1 Actual pleasures and pains as Motives
346
Prospective pleasures and pains Circumstances of ideal persistence
347
Money Bodily Strength Knowledge Formalities Virtues
349
The Will biased by Fixed Ideas
351
THE CONFLICT OF MOTIVES 1 Conflict of concurring pleasures and pains
354
Spontaneity may oppose the motives to the Will ib 3 Exhaustion a bar to the influence of Motives
355
Opposition of two Motives in the Actual ib 5 Conflict between the Actual and the Ideal
357
Intermediate Ends in conflict
358
The Deliberative process conforms to the theory of the Will
362
Ideal or imaginary action
368
Belief attaches to the pursuit of intermediate ends
375
Belief in the order of the World varies with the three elements
382
1 Emotional suscepti
387
Influences on the side of DUTY Sympathy coupled with Pru
393
Meanings of Choice Deliberation Selfdetermination Moral
405
DESCARTES We are conscious of Freedom Liberty is
412
Price Took up Clarkes view of selfmotion
420
Muscular Feelings compared with Sensations The muscular
1
Mode of action in the first place an optical effect
3
Classification of the kinds of Food
8
HOPE and DESPONDENCY are phases of Belief
10
The influence of Belief a test of strength of feeling
18
Figures of Similitude abound in all great works of literary
19
ARISTOTLE Enters his protest against separating Universals from
23
Ends to be served by the analysis of the Feelings
24
HUME Abstract ideas are in themselves individual
29
Brown A general word designates certain particulars together
30
33
33
THE SCHOOLMEN Opposing views were held The question
45
ARNAULD Distinguishes between Image and Idea There
51
Kant His position as between the opposing schools Maintained
58
BUFFIER His anticipation of Reid Defines Common Sense
62
Events narrated have the aid of the Verbal Memory
67
HAMILTON Common Sense another name for the final appeal
68
Enumeration of primary Pleasurc3 and Pains Important distinc
78
THE INTELLECTUAL POWERS Aquinas Reid Stewart Brown
88
SENSATION Expresses various contrasting phenomena 94
94

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Seite 207 - For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception.
Seite 28 - Likewise the idea of man that I frame to myself, must be either of a white, or a black, or a tawny, a straight or a crooked, a tall or a low, or a middle-sized man.
Seite 28 - ... consider some particular parts or qualities separated from others, with which, though they are united in some object, yet it is possible they may really exist without them. But I deny that I can abstract...
Seite 203 - The table I write on I say exists, that is I see and feel it, and if I were out of my study I should say it existed, meaning thereby that if I was in my study I might perceive it, or that some other spirit actually does perceive it.
Seite 27 - Words become general by being made the signs of general ideas : and ideas become general by separating from them the circumstances of time, and place, and any other ideas that may determine them to this or that particular existence.
Seite 64 - There is a certain regard due to human testimony in matters of fact, and even to human authority in matters of opinion.
Seite 28 - Whether others have this wonderful faculty of abstracting their ideas, they best can tell : for myself I find indeed I have a faculty of imagining, or representing to myself the ideas of those particular things I have perceived, and of variously compounding and dividing them.
Seite 75 - ... :—States of pleasure are concomitant with\ an increase, and states of pain with an abatement, of some, ; or all, of the vital functions.
Seite 214 - This puts the final seal to our conception of the groups of possibilities as the fundamental reality in Nature. The permanent possibilities are common to us and to our fellow-creatures ; the actual sensations are not. That which other people become aware of, when and on the same grounds as I do, seems more real to me than that which they do not know of, unless I tell them.
Seite 206 - It is a question of fact, whether the perceptions of the senses be produced by external objects, resembling them: how shall this question be determined? By experience surely; as all other questions of a like nature. But here experience is, and must be entirely silent.

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