The British Essayists: Tatler.-v. 5-12. Spectator.-v. 13-15. Guardian.-v. 16-18. Rambler.-v. 19-21. Adventurer.-v. 22-24. World.-v. 25-26. Connoisseur.-v. 27. Idler.-v. 28-29. Mirror.-v. 30-31. Lounger.-v. 32-34. Observer.-v. 35-37. Looker-on.-v. 38. General index

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Seite 79 - Cowards die many times before their deaths ; The valiant never taste of death but once. Of all the wonders that I yet have heard, It seems to me most strange that men should fear ; Seeing that death, a necessary end, Will come, when it will come.
Seite 361 - Fables: but he frankly declared to me his mind, that "he did not delight in that learning, because he did not believe they were true ; " for which reason I found he had very much turned his studies, for about a twelvemonth past, into the lives and adventures of Don Belianis of Greece, Guy of Warwick, the Seven Champions, and other historians of that age.
Seite 217 - The diseased have ye not strengthened, neither have ye healed that which was sick, neither have ye bound up that which was broken, neither have ye brought again that which was driven away, neither have ye sought that which was lost; but with force and with cruelty have ye ruled them.
Seite 35 - Even such a man, so faint, so spiritless, So dull, so dead in look, so woe-begone, Drew Priam's curtain in the dead of night...
Seite 357 - I am, as it were, at home at that house, and every member of it knows me for their wellwisher. I cannot indeed express the pleasure it is to be met by the children with so much joy as I am when I go thither. The boys and girls strive who shall come first when they think it is I that am knocking at the door ; and that child which loses the race to me runs back again to tell the father it is Mr.
Seite 378 - He that has light within his own clear breast, May sit i' th' centre, and enjoy bright day : But he that hides a dark soul, and foul thoughts, Benighted walks under the mid-day sun ; Himself is his own dungeon.
Seite 192 - He who thinks no man above him but for his virtue, none below him but for his vice, can never be obsequious or assuming in a wrong place; but will frequently emulate men in rank below him, and pity those above him.
Seite 5 - Inspired repulsed battalions to engage, And taught the doubtful battle where to rage. So when an angel, by divine command, With rising tempests shakes a guilty land (Such as of late o'er pale Britannia passed), Calm and serene he drives the furious blast; And pleased the Almighty's orders to perform, Rides in the whirlwind and directs the storm.
Seite 361 - I could not but observe the satisfaction the father took in the forwardness of his son; and that these diversions might turn to some profit, I found the boy had made remarks which might be of service to him during the course of his whole life. He would tell you the mismanagements of John...
Seite 167 - He has so much regard to his congregation that he commits to his memory what he is to say to them; and has so soft and graceful a behaviour that it must attract your attention. His person, it is to be confessed, is no small recommendation; but he is to be highly commended for not losing that advantage; and adding to the propriety of speech, which might pass the criticism of Longinus, an action which would have been approved by Demosthenes.

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