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II.

Tho' the bard to purer joys may soar,

When wild youth's past ; Tho' he win the wise, who frown'd before,

To smile at last

He'll never meet

A joy so sweet,

In all his noon of fame,
As when first he sung to woman's ear

His soul-felt flame,
And at every close she blush'd to hear

The one loved name.

III.

Oh! that hallow'd form is ne'er forgot,

Which first love trac'd ; Still, it lingering haunts the greenest spot

On memory's waste !

II.

Tho' I sit and vote with Peter Moore,

Since all hope's past ;
Tho' I win from those who cough'd before,

A cheer at last;

So sweet a cheer

I ne'er shall hear

From Opposition throats,
As when first I caught the Speaker's eye,

And big with notes,
Moved the Committee of Supply,

On Ordnance votes '*

III.

Oh! never shall from

memory

fleet Dear Palace-yard !+ Still fancy haunts the envied seat

Of Robert Ward. * Mr. Calcraft was Clerk of the Ordnance in the Talents' administration, and moved the Ordnance estimates. E.

+ The Ordnance Office in Palace-yard.

| R. Ward, Esq. M. P. for Haslemere, and now Clerk of the Ordnance.-E.

'Twas odour filed
As soon as shed;

'Twas morning's winged dream; 'Twas a light, that ne'er can shine again

On life's dull stream; Oh! 'twas light that ne'er can shine again

On life's dull stream,

I triumph'd there
But half-a-year,

And touch'd but half the pay! But oh!—I ne’er may touch it more

For half a-day;
Alas! I ne'er may touch it more

For half a-day!

ENGLISH MELODIES.

No. II.

WE to-day present our readers with one of Lord Byron's Hebrew Melodies, which for vigour of language, ease of versification, and magnificence of idea, is one of the most admirable lyric compositions in modern poetry. Anxious, however, to fulfil our engagement with the public, we have not feared to enter the lists even with this excellent performance, and we trust thatour“ Debate on the Navy Estimates" will not be found unworthy our model. We are not authorised, much as we admire his work, to state the imitator's name; but, from the ingenuous diffidence which such a silence implies, many of our read

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