A Descriptive Catalogue of the Antiquities in the Museum of the Royal Irish Academy: Articles of stone, earthen, vegetable and animal materials; and of copper and bronze. (1863)

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Royal Irish academy house, 1863
 

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Seite 606 - In the Proceedings and Papers of the Kilkenny and South-East of Ireland Archaeological Society...
Seite 120 - ... stones still remain, and which is there 17 feet 6 inches high upon the inside. It has one square doorway in the ssw side, 5 feet 9 inches high, with sloping sides, 4 feet 2 inches wide at top, and 5 feet at bottom. In the substance of this massive wall,- and opening inwards, are two small chambers; the one on the west side is 12 feet long, 4 feet 7 inches wide, and 6 feet 6 inches high; the northern chamber is 7 feet 4 inches long, 4 feet 9 inches wide, and 7 feet high. They formed a part of...
Seite 638 - ... when you have those singularly beautiful curves — more beautiful, perhaps, in the parts that are not seen than in those that meet the eye— whose beauty, revealed in shadow more than in form — you have a peculiar characteristic — a form of beauty which belongs to no nation but our own, and to no portion of our nation but the Keltic portion.
Seite 309 - NS, p. 186. banian ; and the abbas of the Turk and most oriental people, including the Hebrews. In the twelfth century, Giraldus Cambrensis thus briefly describes the costume of the Irish : they " wear thin, woollen clothes, mostly black, because the sheep of Ireland are in general of that colour; the dress itself is of a barbarous fashion ; they wear cappuces, which spread over their shoulders, and reach down to the elbow. These upper coverings are made of fabrics of different textures, with others...
Seite 222 - The space thus inclosed was divided into separate compartments by septa or divisions that intersected one another in different directions ; these were also formed of oaken beams in a state of great preservation, joined together with greater accuracy than the former, and in some cases having their sides grooved or rabbited to admit large panels, driven down between them.
Seite 221 - ... but submerged in winter. These were enlarged and fortified by piles of oaken timber, and in some cases by stone-work. A few were approached by moles or causeways, but, generally speaking, they were completely insulated and only accessible by boat ; and it is notable that in almost every instance an ancient canoe was discovered in connection with the crannoge. Being thus insulated, they afforded secure...
Seite 222 - The circumference of the circle was formed by upright posts of black oak, measuring from six to eight feet in height; these were mortised into beams of a similar material, laid flat upon the marl and sand beneath the bog, and nearly sixteen feet below the present surface. The upright posts were held together by connecting crossbeams, and (said to be) fastened by large iron nails ; parts...
Seite 179 - This beautiful little urn stands but 2£ inches high, and is 3| across the outer margin of the lip, which is the widest portion. Its decoration consists of nine sets of upright marks, each containing three cross-barred elevations, narrowing towards the base, which is slightly hollowed ; the intervals between these are filled with more...
Seite 310 - ... to be feared than to be loved : a great oppressor of his nobilitie, but a great advancer of the poore and weake. To his owne people he was rough and greevous, and hatefull to strangers ; he would be against all men, and all men against Fig. 195. * " SylveBtcr Giraldus Cambrensis, bis vaticinall Historic of the Conquest of Irelaud,
Seite 227 - The outer paling of stakes includes a circle 60 feet in diameter, in some parts double or] treble ; " there are clusters of stakes in other portions of the island, some of which appear to have been placed with regard to a particular arrangement. A, the central oblong portion, consists of a platform of round logs, cut in lengths of from 4 to 6 feet, chiefly of alder timber. B, a collection of stones with marks of fire on them. C, a heap of stiff clay. D, the root of a large tree, nearly buried in...

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