The Scenery and Poetry of the English Lakes: A Summer Ramble

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1852 - 269 Seiten
This volume recollects the author's?journey through the English Lakes, with an emphasis on its Romantic poetry associations.
 

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Seite 176 - Fear and trembling Hope, Silence and Foresight; Death the Skeleton And Time the Shadow ; — there to celebrate, As in a natural temple scattered o'er With altars undisturbed of mossy stone, United worship ; or in mute repose To lie, and listen to the mountain flood Murmuring from Glaramara's inmost caves.
Seite 204 - There is a Yew-tree, pride of Lorton Vale, Which to this day stands single, in the midst Of its own darkness, as it stood of yore : Not loth to furnish weapons for the bands Of Umfraville or Percy ere they marched To Scotland's heaths ; or those that crossed the sea And drew their sounding bows at Azincour, Perhaps at earlier Crecy, or Poictiers. Of vast circumference and gloom profound This solitary Tree ! a living thing Produced too slowly ever to decay ; Of form and aspect too magnificent To be...
Seite 13 - Visits to Remarkable Places : Old Halls, Battle-Fields, and Scenes illustrative of Striking Passages in English History and Poetry. By WILLIAM HOWITT. 2 vols. square crown 8vo. with Wood Engravings, 25s. The Rural Life of England.
Seite 168 - For a while, till it sleeps In its own little lake. And thence at departing, Awakening and starting, It runs through the reeds, And away it proceeds Through meadow and glade, In sun and in shade, And through the wood-shelter, Among crags in its flurry, Helter-skelter, Hurry-skurry.
Seite 104 - When, wildered, he drops from some cliff huge in stature, And draws his last sob by the side of his dam.
Seite 168 - And, moreover, he tasked me To tell him in rhyme. Anon at the word There first came one daughter And then came another, To second and third The request of their brother And to hear how the water Comes down at Lodore, With its rush and its roar As many a time They had seen it before. So I told them in rhyme, For of rhymes I had store, And 'twas in my vocation For their recreation That so I should sing; Because I was Laureate To them and the King.
Seite 170 - And hitting and splitting, And shining and twining, And rattling and battling, And shaking and quaking, And pouring and roaring, And waving and raving. And tossing and crossing, And flowing and going, And running and stunning, And foaming and roaming, And dinning and spinning.
Seite 254 - There came a man, by middle day, He spied his sport, and went away ; And brought the king that very night, Who brake my bower, and slew my knight. He slew my knight, to me sae dear ; He slew my knight, and poin'd his gear.
Seite 169 - Eddying and whisking, Spouting and frisking, Turning and twisting, Around and around With endless rebound ; Smiting and fighting, A sight to delight in ; Confounding, astounding, Dizzying, and deafening the ear with its sound, 4.
Seite 149 - Paled in by many a lofty hill, The narrow dale lay smooth and still, And, down its verdant bosom led, A winding brooklet found its bed.

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