A Critical Enquiry Into the Moral Writings of Dr. Samuel Johnson: In which the Tendency of Certain Passages in the Rambler, and Other Publications of that Celebrated Writer, is Impartially Considered. To which is Added an Appendix. Containg a Dialogue Between Boswell and Johnson in the Shades

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C. Corrall, 1802 - 144 Seiten
 

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Seite 87 - He must divest himself of the prejudices of his age or country ; he must consider right and wrong in their abstracted and invariable state ; he must disregard present laws and opinions, and rise to general and transcendental truths, which will always be the same...
Seite 76 - Resistless burns the fever of renown, Caught from the strong contagion of the gown: O'er Bodley's dome his future labours spread. And Bacon's mansion trembles o'er his head.
Seite 87 - But the knowledge of nature is only half the task of a poet; he must be acquainted likewise with all the modes of life. His character requires that he estimate the happiness and misery of every condition, observe the power of all the passions in all their combinations and trace the changes of the human mind as they are modified by various institutions and accidental influences of climate or custom from the sprightliness of infancy to the despondence of decrepitude.
Seite 79 - To press the weary minutes' flagging wings; New sorrow rises as the day returns, A sister sickens, or a daughter mourns; Now kindred Merit fills the sable bier, Now lacerated Friendship claims a tear; Year chases year, decay pursues decay, Still drops some joy from...
Seite 73 - Has Heaven reserv'd in pity to the poor, No pathless waste or undiscovered shore ? No secret island in the boundless main ? No peaceful desert yet unclaimed by Spain ? Quick let us rise, the happy seats explore And bear oppression's insolence no more.
Seite 74 - On ev'ry stage the foes of peace attend, Hate dogs their flight, and insult mocks their end. Love ends with hope, the sinking statesman's door Pours in the morning...
Seite 78 - New sorrow rises as the day returns, A sister sickens, or a daughter mourns. Now kindred Merit fills the sable bier, Now lacerated Friendship claims a tear; Year chases year, decay pursues decay, Still drops some joy from with'ring life away ; New forms arise, and...
Seite 77 - Nor think the doom of man revers'd for thee: Deign on the passing world to turn thine eyes, And pause awhile from Letters, to be wise; There mark what ills the scholar's life assail, Toil, envy, want, the patron, and the jail. See nations, slowly wise, and meanly just, To buried merit raise the tardy bust.
Seite 94 - I could be content that we might procreate like trees without conjunction, or that there were any way to perpetuate the world without this trivial and vulgar way of coition : it is the foolishest act a wise man commits in all his life ; nor is there any thing that will more deject his cooled imagination, when he shall consider what an odd and unworthy piece of folly he hath committed.
Seite 96 - Such is the common process of marriage. A youth and maiden meeting by chance, or brought together by artifice, exchange glances, reciprocate civilities, go home and dream of one another. Having little to divert attention, or diversify thought, they find themselves uneasy when they are apart, and therefore conclude that they shall be happy together. They marry, and discover what nothing but voluntary blindness before had concealed : they wear out life in altercations, and charge nature with cruelty.

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