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ANIMAL PLAGUES:

THEIR

HISTORY, NATURE, AND PREVENTION.

BY

GEORGE FLEMING, F.R.G.S., ETC.

PRESIDENT OF THE CENTRAL VETERINARY MEDICAL SOCIETY; MEMBER OF COUNCIL OF THE
KOYAL COLLEGE OF VETERINARY SURGEONS : VETERINARY SURGEON, ROYAL ENGINEERS;

AUTHOR OF 'TRAVELS ON HORSEBACK IN MANTCHU TARTARY,'

AND HORSE-SHOES AND HORSE-SHOEING,' ETC.

LONDON:

CHAPMAN AND HALL, 193, PICCADILLY.

1871.

[All Rights reserved.]

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Non tam creber agens hiemen ruit aquore turbo,
Quam multæ pecudum pestes. Nec singula morbi
Corpora corripiunt, sed tota æstiva repente
Spemque gregemque simul, cunctamque ab origine gentum.

Virgil. Georgics, lib. ii. 470.

Non est in medico semper relevetur ut æger ;
Interdum doctå plus valet arte malum.-OviD.

To be ignorant of what has occurred before our time, is ever to remain in a state of

childhood.-CICERO.

PREFACE.

For very many years the subject of Animal Plagues' has occupied a large share of my attention during the hours spared from more pressing every-day professional duties, and no opportunity of adding to a knowledge of it has been allowed to pass. Since 1865, when this country was much harassed and ravaged by a destructive exotic disease, its importance has greatly increased, and public attention has been much occupied by it. Previous to that year, the maladies of the lower animals, and particularly those of a contagious or spreading character, had received but little if any notice, save among a few members of the veterinary profession, who vainly attempted to point out their dangerous tendencies, and their baneful effects on the agriculture of the country, as well as their amenableness to legislative measures carefully carried out. The striking facts elucidated in this respect in 1865 and 1866, have corroborated, in every particular, the justness and value of these unheeded indications. It is scarcely necessary to say, that had the history of the malady then raging been better known, serious loss and embarrassment might have been avoided, and more credit would have been due to us as an enlightened people.

The science of Comparative Pathology has made but little progress in this country; it has not been looked upon with much favour by the medical profession, and has been neglected altogether by successive

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