Descriptive and Illustrated Catalogue of the Histological Series Contained in the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons of England: Elementary tissues of vegetables and animals

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Seite 185 - ... the stomach itself would be digested. But we find, on the contrary, that the stomach, which at one instant, that is, while possessed of the living principle, was capable of resisting the digestive powers which it contained, the next moment, viz., when deprived of the living principle, is itself capable of being digested, either by the digestive powers of other stomachs, or by the remains of that power which it had of digesting other things.
Seite 163 - ... one to the left and the other to the right of the cardiac orifices, analogous to those in the stomach of the Hog.
Seite 185 - If it were possible for a man's hand, for example, to be introduced into the stomach of & living animal, and kept there for some considerable time, it would be found, that the dissolvent powers of the stomach...
Seite 184 - That no animal substance can be digested, by the digesting fluid usually' existing in animal stomachs, while life remains in such animal substances. Animals, (says he) or parts of animals, possessed of the living principle, when taken into the stomach, are not in the least affected by the powers of that viscus, so long as the animal principle remains.
Seite 183 - But as an animal body undergoes changes after death, or when dead, it has never been sufficiently considered what those changes are; and till this be done, it is impossible we should judge accurately of the appearances in dead bodies. The diseases which the living body undergoes (mortification excepted) are always connected with the living principle, and are not in the least similar to what may be called diseases or changes in the dead body...
Seite 90 - In its growth three parts appear to be formed; one from the rising core, which is the centre ; я second on the outside ; and a third being the intermediate substance. These appear to have three stages of duration ; for that which forms on the core, I believe, makes the hair, and that on the outside makes principally the plate of whalebone ; this, when got a certain length, breaks off, leaving the hair projecting, becoming at the termination very brittle ; and the third or intermediate substance,...
Seite 172 - The rumen is lined with cuticle, but is wholly destitute of the villi which characterize it in the horned ruminants. It is partially divided into two compartments by a strong fasciculus of muscular fibres, which commencing on the left side of the cardiac orifice, traverses the paunch longitudinally. On the right side of this ridge, about fourteen smaller muscular fasciculi pass off at right angles, and these ridges are connected by still smaller fasciculi, running transversely between them, at...
Seite 89 - As both the whalebone and intermediate substance are constantly growing, and as we must suppose a determined length, necessary, a regular mode of decay must be established, not depending entirely on chance, or the use it is put to. In its growth three parts appear to be formed ; one from the rising core, which is the centre ; a second on the outside ; and a third being the intermediate substance. These appear to h'ave three stages of duration ; for that which forms on the core, I believe, makes...
Seite 100 - These creatures," says that distinguished observer of Nature, " do not shed their teeth as other animals do that have more than one ; for those that have more than one tooth can afford to be for some time without some of their teeth : therefore the young tooth comes up in many nearly in the same place with its predecessor, and some exactly underneath ; so that the shedding tooth falls sometimes before the succeeding tooth can supply its uses. But this would not have answered in the Elephant ; for...
Seite 175 - Arab historian (Beidawi), who, in his account of the Prophet's expedition to Tabuc against the Greeks, relates, among other distresses of the army, that they were reduced to the necessity of killing their camels for the sake of the water contained in their stomachs. — Sale, Koran, p. 164. Gibbon, Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, vp 245.

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