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with it: The using or not using of this garlic is left. to your discretion. *

M. B." This dish of meat is too good for any but anglers, or very honest men; and I trust you will prove both, and therefore I have trusted you with this secret.

Let me next tell you, that Ge ner ells us, there are no Pikes in Spain, and that the largest are in the Lake Thrasymene in Italy; and the next, if not equal to them, are the Pikes of England; and that in England, Lincolnshire boasteth to have the biggest.† Just so doth Sussex boast of four sorts of fish, namely, an Arundel Mullet, a Chichester Lobster, a Shelsey Cockle, and an Amerly Trout.

But I will take up no more of your time with this relation, but proceed to give you some observations of the Carp, and how to angle for him; and to dress him, but not till he is caught.

PISCATOR. THE Carp is the queen of rivers ; a On the Carp. stately, a good, and a very subtile fish ; that was not at first bred, nor hath been long in England, but is now

CHAP. IX.

* It may perhaps be deemed amusing to compare Walton's method of conking the Pike, with that practised in the Royal kitchens in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, as preserved in the Sloane MS. No. 1201. For to make a pyke in galentyne. Take a pyke and quarter hym, and sethe hym in scharpe sawse, and than pille awey the skynne and ley hym in a fayre vessell of tre or of erthe, and than take whyte wyne and whyte vynegre, and take fayre breed and put thereto, and make it hoote over the fyre, and than drawe it thorough a streynor. Than caste thereto powdre of pepper and of galyngale of cloves, salt it fyre and gvffe it a lytell hete and stere it wele fogedre and put it to thy syssche, and whan thou wilte have of it. take uppe apece or two with the sawse, and cast powdre of gynger uppon it and serve it forth.

“A pyke boyled. Take and make a sawse of fayre water and salt and a lyttell ale and a percyle and then take a pyke and nape hym and drawe hym in the bely, and slytte hym thorow the bely, backe, and hede, and tayle with a knyfe in two peces, and smyte the sydes in quarteres, and wasshe hem clene, and yiffe ihow wilt have hym rownde scoche hym by the hede in the backe, and drawe hym there, and scoche hym in two places or jij in the backe, but not thorough. And slytte the pouche and kepe the frye or the lyvre, and cutte awey the galle, and whan the sawse begynneth to boyle, skym it, and wasche the pyke, and cast hym thereinne, and cast the frye and the pouche thereto, and lete it boyle togedres. And then make the sawse thus: mynse small the pouche and the frye in a lytell gravey of the pyke, and cast thereto poware of gynger, cavell, verjuice, and mustard, and salt."

| It has been a common notion that the Pike was not extant in England till the reign of Henry the Eighth ; but it occurs very frequently in the “Forme of Cury," compiled about 1390

The old name was Luce, or Lucy. An ancient MS. formerly in the possession of John Topham, Esq., written about 1250, mentions". Lupos aquaticos sive Luceos " amongst the fish which the fishmongers were to have in their shops. Three Lucies were the arms of the Lucy family, as tarly as the reign of Henry the Third ; and io a contemporary Roll of arms they are thus described, "Geffrey de Lucy, de goules trois lucies d'or. In the 6th Rich. II. Ao. 1382, the mayor and citizens of London prayed that no fishmonger, nor any other person free of the City, might thenceforward buy any kind of fish to sell again in the City, excepting pikes and fresh cels, “ forspris pikes, anguilles fresshes," &c. Rot. Parl. vol. iii. p. 142.b In the Roll of the same Parliament, the words horspris anguilles fresshes, beketes ou pikes,” occur. Ibid.

Compare Pennant's Zoology. vol. iii. p. 260, 4t0. Lelandi Collectanca, vol. vi. 1, 5, 6.

That the Pike was here in Edward the Thiru's time is evident from Chaucer's Prologue to the Canterbury Tales, edit. Tyrwh. p. 351, 352:

Full many a fair partrich hadde he in mewe,
And many a Breme and many a Luce in stewe."

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