Mental Philosophy Including the Intellect, Sensibilities, and Will

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Sheldon, 1883 - 590 Seiten

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Seite 415 - I may therefore conclude, that the passion of laughter is nothing else but sudden glory arising from a sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves, by comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly...
Seite 398 - There, held in holy passion still, Forget thyself to marble, till With a sad leaden downward cast, Thou fix them on the earth as fast; And join with thee calm Peace and Quiet, Spare Fast, that oft with gods doth diet.
Seite 420 - My liege, I did deny no prisoners. But, I remember, when the fight was done, When I was dry with rage, and extreme toil, Breathless and faint, leaning upon my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, trimly dress'd, Fresh as a bridegroom...
Seite 414 - ... for wit lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those together with quickness and variety, wherein can be found any resemblance or congruity, thereby to make up pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy...
Seite 420 - He was perfumed like a milliner, And 'twixt his finger and his thumb he held A pouncet-box, which ever and anon He gave his nose and took 't away again; Who, therewith angry, when it next came there, Took it in snuff...
Seite 575 - Liberty is the absence of all the impediments to action that are not contained in the nature and intrinsical quality of the agent. As for example, the water is said to descend freely, or to have liberty to descend by the channel of the river, because there is no impediment that way, but not across, because the banks are impediments. And though...
Seite 157 - The twilight hours, like birds, flew by, As lightly and as free ; Ten thousand stars were in the sky, Ten thousand on the sea : , For every wave with dimpled face, That leaped upon the air, Had caught a star in its embrace And held it trembling there.
Seite 423 - The reason is, that the outward signs of a dull man and a wise man are the same, and so are the outward signs of a frivolous man and a witty man ; and we are not to expect that the majority will be disposed to look to much more than the outward sign. I believe the fact to be, that wit is very seldom the only eminent quality which resides in the mind of any man ; it is commonly accompanied by many other talents of every description, and ought to be considered as a strong evidence of a fertile and...
Seite 579 - Nothing that I maintain, supposes that men are at all hindered by any fatal necessity, from doing, and even willing and choosing as they please, with full freedom; yea, 'with the highest degree of liberty that ever was thought of, or that ever could possibly enter into the heart of any man to conceive.
Seite 288 - From things deform'd, or disarranged, or gross In species ? This, nor gems, nor stores of gold, Nor purple state, nor culture can bestow ; But God alone when first his active hand Imprints the secret bias of the souL...

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