The Apophthegmes of Erasmus

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Robert Roberts, 1877 - 468 Seiten
 

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Seite 423 - There's not a budding boy or girl this day, But is got up, and gone to bring in may.
Seite 435 - It is better to dwell in the corner of the housetop, than with a brawling woman and in a wide house.
Seite 465 - For he who fights and runs away May live to fight another day ; But he who is in battle slain Can never rise and fight again.
Seite 459 - We see then how far the monuments of wit and learning are more durable than the monuments of power, or of the hands. For have not the verses of Homer continued twenty-five hundred years, or more, without the loss of a syllable or letter ; during which time, infinite palaces, temples, castles, cities, have been decayed and demolished...
Seite 18 - In their lowest servitude and depression, the subjects of the Byzantine throne were still possessed of a golden key that could unlock the treasures of antiquity; of a musical and prolific language, that gives a soul to the objects of sense, and a body to the abstractions of philosophy.
Seite 459 - Lastly, leaving the vulgar arguments that by learning man excelleth man in that wherein man excelleth beasts ; that by learning man ascendeth to the heavens and their motions, where in body he cannot come, and the like : let us conclude with the dignity and excellency of knowledge and learning in that whereunto man's nature doth mos't aspire, which is, immortality or continuance : for to this tendeth generation, and raising of houses and families ; to this...
Seite 410 - From Paul's I went, to Eton sent, To learn straightways the Latin phrase, Where fifty-three stripes given to me At once I had. For fault but small, or none at all, It came to pass thus beat I was; See, Udal, see the mercy of thee To me, poor lad.
Seite 427 - HE that hath wife and children hath given hostages to fortune ; for they are impediments to great enterprises, either of virtue or mischief. Certainly the best works, and of greatest merit for the public, have proceeded from the unmarried or childless men ; which both in affection and means have married and endowed the public.
Seite 460 - But the images of men's wits and knowledges remain in books, exempted from the wrong of time and capable of perpetual renovation. Neither are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds...
Seite 423 - ... ere this is come Back, and with white-thorn laden home. Some have despatched their cakes and cream, Before that we have left to dream: And some have wept and woo'd, and plighted troth, And chose their priest, ere we can cast off sloth : Many a green-gown has been given, Many a kiss, both odd and even: Many a glance, too, has been sent From out the eye, love's firmament: Many a jest told of the keys...

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