Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

assembled here, beyond the observation of their friends, with, in most cases, a plentiful supply of money, and just at the most unrestrainable period of life. It at any rate speaks well for the decorous habits of the students, and the discipline of the University. From what is often said in popular works, we might be tempted to believe the two Universities to be little better than nurseries of rampant vice. It is far from the case. Every candid man who has had fair means of judging, must own, that the conduct of the great body of students is highly commendable, and such as is worthy of English gentlemen. There is, of course, a good deal of exuberance of the animal spirits, and, no doubt, much that is not as it should be; but if due allowance be made, the evil is comparatively small. There are sour-tempered people who look on even the manly sports of the place as mischievous; but in truth they are most valuable. There are, indeed, many students who triumph on the Cam, and in Parker's Piece, whose knowledge in the arts is chiefly confined to those of bumping' and bowling, and whose philological acquisitions are mainly in the language of the stable, and who require skilful .coaching' to pass anyhow through the University examination; but then there are more whoso rowing and cricketing, so far from interfering with their serious studies, by giving bodily vigour, enables them to go more easily through them: and often the crack bat or stroke is well up, if not first in the tripos. There is, of course, a good deal of extravagance in language and conduct observable among the students; but it belongs to their time of life; and the least hopeful of all students is ever the prim, correct, precise, and 'nervous' one. Our Cambridge students are, by the admission of all who know them best, a fine, manly, promising body—earnest in study, respectable in conduct, gentlemen in manners.

We add a list of the Colleges and Halls of Cambridge, with the dates of their foundation, the title of the Principal of the Institution, the number of Members on the Boards, and of Undergraduates, in 1850-51.

[blocks in formation]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]

324 Bishop Stortford. 25$

Ancient Church; remains of 351 Stanstead 22

Castle. 37 Elsenham 20 Newport 15$ Newport : large old Church.

Audley Endi fine mansion

of the time of James I. 43} · Audley End.. 14 Saffron Walden, 1} iniles,

a market town: interest

ing antiquarian remains. 47} Chesterford .. 10

(Branch to New

market, 16 miles.) 51 .. Whittlesford .. 65 544 Shelford 31 57.

. CAMBRIDGE,

Ickleton, 1 mile .....

[merged small][merged small][graphic][ocr errors][graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[ocr errors][merged small]

LEAMINGTON AND COVENTRY.

FORTY years ago, Leamington was a little village, of rude, thatched, clay cottages, ranged around a dirty duck-pond. It was called Leamington Priors to distinguish it from another little village in the same neighbourhood, also named Leamington. Fo some time its springs had been known ; and many visitors resorted to them from the surrounding towns; yet “no stage coach,” says a newspaper of the day, passes within two miles of the place;" and the lanes leading to the village had such deep ruts, as to render them almost impassable. In 1811, there were but 60 houses in Leamington, and 543 inhabitants. In 1841, the houses had increased to 2550, and the inhabitants to 12,600. At the present time, the population is probably upwards of 15,000; while, instead of being a little dirty village, Leamington boasts itself to be “a large and handsome town, proverbial for being better paved and lighted, cleaner and better regulated, and, in a word, more complete in all that constitutes the charm of civilized life, than any other town of its size and character in Great Britain !" So the town boasts, or rather, did boast a short time back. But if any town have such an opinion of itself, let it not send for a “Superintending Inspector to the General Board of Health.” Leamington did so; and behold! in good time appears a “ Report,” decorated with an ominously fierce-looking lion, and very uncomfortable unicorn, which reveals all the hidden dirt, shows the deficient drainage, publishes the unflagged footways, numbers the pig-sties, makes palpable every kind of unsavoury matter; and, in short, demonstrates to the unsuspecting inhabitants that their vaunt is vanity, that they have been surrounded with all unwholesome "conditions," while they foolishly imagined they were very patterns of cleanliness, and full of health ; and that, in a word, their town, instead of being " complete in all that constitutes the charm, &c.," is in a most alarming state of sanitary incompleteness. However, the Superintending Inspector, while he asserted that it is “a very mistaken notion, that the town was absolutely clean, or that no part of it was in a condition materially to weaken health or shorten life,” had the grace to admit that "it was perhaps true, that Leamington was among the cleanest of English watering-places," which, though rather cold commendation, is much more ardent than it is at all usual to obtain from a Superintending Inspector, who would literally walk from Land'send to Tweed-mouth, and cry all is unclean.

The Springs, to which Leamington owes its fame, were known in the sixteenth century. They are mentioned as a curiosity by Camden. Fuller, in the following century, in describing the Wonders of Warwickshire, says, “At Leamington, within two miles of Warwick, there issue out (within a stride) of the womb of the earth, two twin spring, as different in taste and operation, as Esau and Jacob in disposition, —the one salt, the other fresh. Thus the meanest countryman doth plainly see the effects, whilst it would pose a consultation of philosophers to assign the true cause

« ZurückWeiter »