Sir John Froissart's Chronicles of England, France, Spain, and the Adjoining Countries: From the Latter Part of the Reign of Edward II. to the Coronation of Henry IV, Band 2

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1805
 

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Seite 337 - My lord, you have a right to say whatever you please, but I wish it were as you have said. If I have this day been forward to serve you, it has been to accomplish a vow that I had made, and it ought not to be thought so much of.
Seite 162 - Gentlemen, you are all my people, my friends and brethren at arms this day : therefore, as I am blind, I request of you to lead me so far into the engagement that I may strike one stroke with my sword.
Seite 167 - The governor, hearing the king's voice, immediately descended, opened the gate, and let down the bridge. The king and his company entered the castle; but he had...
Seite 162 - ... wounding many, made them caper and fall among the Genoese, so that they were in such confusion they could never rally again. In the English army there were some Cornish and Welshmen on foot who had armed themselves with large knives; these, advancing through the ranks of the men at arms and archers, who made way for them, came upon the French when they were in this danger and, falling upon earls, barons, knights and squires, slew many, at which the King of England was afterwards much exasperated.
Seite 131 - England was come near to the town, he encamped ; he would not lodge in it for fear of fire. He sent, therefore, his advanced guard forward, who soon conquered it, at a trifling loss, and completely plundered it. No one can imagine the quantity of riches they found in it, nor the number of bales of cloth.
Seite 159 - Those that were in the front halted; but those behind said they would not halt, until they were as forward as the front. When the front perceived the rear pressing on, they pushed forward; and neither the king nor the marshals could stop them, but...
Seite 331 - The pursuit continued even to the gates of Poitiers, where there was much slaughter and overthrow of men and horses ; for the inhabitants of Poitiers had shut their gates, and would suffer none to enter : upon which account...
Seite 158 - Sir, I will speak, since it pleases you to order me, but under the correction of my companions. We have advanced far enough to reconnoitre your enemies. Know, then, that they are drawn up in three battalions and are waiting for you. I would advise for my part (submitting, however, to better counsel) that you halt your army here...
Seite 320 - God and St. George. But he must be well fought with ; and you have before said that you would show yourself this day a good knight." The prince replied, "John, get forward : you shall not see me turn my back this day, but I will always be among the foremost.
Seite 167 - After he had said this, he took the bridle of the king's horse, and led him off by force; for he had before entreated of him to retire. The king rode on until he came to the castle of La Broyes, where he found the gates shut, for it was very dark. The king ordered the governor of it to be summoned : he came upon the battlements, and asked who it was that called at such an hour? The king answered, "Open, open, governor; it is the fortune of France.

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