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Catullus, c, Valerina

CATULLI, TIBULLI, PROPERTII

POEMATA SELECTA.

SELECTIONS FROM

CATULLUS, TIBULLUS, AND PROPERTIUS.

With English Notes.

By A. H. WRATISLAW, M.A.
UYAD MASTER OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL, BURY ST. EDMUND'S, AND FORMERLY

FELLOW AND TUTOR OF CHRIST'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDG E;

AND

F. N. SUTTON, B.A.

SCHOLAR OF CHRIST'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.

LONDON: GEORGE BELL & SONS, YORK STREET,

COVENT GARDEN.

1891.

LONDON : PRINTED BY GILBERT AND RIVINGTON, LD., ST. JOHN'S HOUSE, CLERKENWELL ROAD, E.C.

1.21.41

2-5-41V.A.

PREFACE.

The Latin poets Catullus, Tibullus, and Propertius have frequently been included in the same volume, but a collection of selections from them suitable to be read with a class of young persons was thought to be required. This desideratum, it is hoped, will be supplied by the present little work, which will also endeavour to represent the present state of scholarship as regards these authors and the Latin language, both in its text and in its notes. As regards the part taken by the joint editors, it is to be stated that Mr. Sutton undertook the editorship of the selections from Catullus and Tibullus, and Mr. Wratislaw that of those from Propertius, the whole passing under the revision of Mr. Wratislaw.

In the selections from Catullus the edition of DOERING has furnished a basis for the notes, but not for the text, which is presented in a much more satisfactory state (after LACHMANN) by both Rossbach and Mr. ELLIS. Mr. COOKESLEY's Eton edition of selections is very rich in quotations, but his text is even less satisfactory than Doering's. In Tibullus the exhaustive edition of DISSEN (after LACHMANN) has furnished a most satisfactory basis as regards both the text and its explanation.

No one edition has been specially taken as a basis for the selections from Propertius, but those of JACOB (after LACHMANN), HERZBERG and Mr. PALEY have been consulted for both the text and notes, and that of KUINOEL for the notes only. Several difficult passages have received new and original explanations, which it is hoped will be considered satisfactory.

The brief Biographies of the three Poets, and the Essay on the Catullian Metres are by Mr. Wratislaw. In the latter an attempt has been made so to explain the metre of the Attis or Atys in a simple manner, and so to exhibit it in a tabular form, that every line of the poem shall be capable of being scanned at once on a definite principle without difficulty.

LIFE OF CATULLUS.

CAIUS (according to Apuleius), or QUINTUS (according to the Elder Pliny), VALERIUS CATULLUS was born at or near Verona, in the consulship of Cinna and Octavius, B.C. 87, as stated by Hieronymus in the Eusebian Chronicle. He was alive in the consulship of Vatinius, B.C. 47, after which time we lose all trace of him. His father was a friend of Julius Caesar, and Catullus himself must have possessed a fair independence, owning a villa at Sirmio, another at or near Tibur, and a yacht, which he dedicated after sailing in it from the Black Sea. Leading a gay life at Rome, he appears to have got into pecuniary difficulties, with which he endeavoured to grapple by going to Bithynia in the cohors or suite of the Propraetor Memmius, who, however, appears to have taken the greater portion of what was to be gained for himself, leaving but poor pickings for his subordinates.

Apuleius tells us, that the real name of his lady-love LESBIA was Clodia, but the Claudian or Clodian gens being a very large one, it is vain to seek to identify her with the sister of Cicero's enemy, Clodius. Catullus lampooned Julius Caesar in the most insulting manner; but on his apologizing Caesar forgave the insult, invited him to his table, and continued to visit his father as before. No Latin writer but Horace (1 Sat. x. 19) speaks slightingly of the works of Catullus; and he appears to do so rather from vexation at the studied depreciation of the talent of the day, which seems to

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