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WORKS OF VIRGIL.

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A LARGE VARIETY OF BOTANICAL, MYTHOLOGICAL, AND HISTORICAL

NOTES,

SELECTED AND ORIGINAL,

WITH A VIEW TO FACILITATE THE ACQUISITION OF THE MEANING, AND TO PROMOTE

A TASTE FOR THE BEAUTIES OF THE ILLUSTRIOUS AUTHOR,

BY WILLIAM STAUGHTON, D. D.

SECOND EDITION:

PHILADELPHIA:

H, C. CAREY AND I. LEA-CHESTNUT STREET.

EASTERN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA, TO WIT:

BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the twenty-ninth day of August, in the fiftieth year of the Independence of the United States of America, A. D. 1825, H. C. Carey and Í. Lea, of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the words following, to wit:

“ The Works of Virgil : with the Latin Interpretation of Ruæus, and the English Notes of Davidson. With a Clavis. To which is added a large variety of Botanical, Mythological, and Historical Notes, selected and original, with a view to facilitate the acquisition of the Meaning, and to promote a Taste for the Beauties of the Ilustrious Author, by William Staughton, D. D. Second edition.”

In conformity to the act of the congress of the United States, intituled, " An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times thereiv mentioned.”And also to the act, entitled, "An act supplementary to an act, entitled “ An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned,” and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints."

D. CALDWELL,
Clerk of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

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MEL.

MELIB@US, TITYRUS.
TITYRE, tu patulæ recubans sub tegmine fagi,

INTERPRETATIO.
Sylvestrem tenui Musam meditaris avenâ :

Mel. Tityre, tu jacens

sub umbraculo fagi opaca, Nos patriæ fines, et dulcia linquimus arva ;

modalaris cautilenam pas. Nos patriam fugimus : Tu, Tityre, lentus in umbrâ toralem cum parvå fistula : Formosam resonare doces Amaryllida sylvas.

5

nos deserimus terminos pa

trice, et agros amanos; nos Tit. O Melibee, Deus nobis hæc otia fecit.

exiirus e patriá : tu, Tity. Namque erit ille mihi semper Deus : illius aram re, otiosus sub umbrâ, do

ces arbores referre nomen Sæpe tener nostris ab ovilibus imbuet

agnus.

pulchra Amaryllidis.--Tit. Ille meas errare boyes, ut cernis, et ipsum

O Melibee, Deus nobis Ludere, quæ vellem, calamo permisit agresti. 10 dedit banc quietem. Nam mel. Non equidem invideo : miror magis : undiq; totis habebo semper illum Dei

loco: scepe tener agnus electus ex ovili nostro tinget illius aram sanguine. Ille permisit vaccas meas vagari, ut vides, a me ipsum canere fistulâ rusticâ quicquid vellein.-Mel. Ego quidem non invideo, imò admiror,

NOTES. The occasion of the first pastoral was this: plainly distinguishes them. Metam. lib. x. When Augustus had settled himself in the v. 91, 92. Roman empire, that he might reward his 2. Silvestrem Musam, i. e, rusticum carveteran troops for their past service, he dis- men, Lucretius, lib. II. tributed among them all the lands that lay Fistula silvestrem ne cesset findere Muabout Mantua and Cremona, turning out

sam. the right owners for having sided with his 2. Meditaris, i, e. exerces, exercise your enemies. Virgil (or his father) was a suf- rural muse, as in Plautus, Stich. II 1. 34. ferer among the rest ; but he recovered his Ad cursum meditabor me. And Cic. 1. de estate by the intercession of Mæcenas, Pol. Orat. 62. Demosthenes perfecit meditando, lio, and 'Varus. Virgil, as an instance of his ut nemo planius eo locutus putaretur. gratitude, composed the following pastoral; 2. Avená. For fistula avenacea. The muwhere he sets out his father's good fortune sical instruments used by shepherds were in the person of Tityrus, and the calamities at first made of oat and wheat straw ; then of his Mantuan neighbours in the character of reeds and hollow pipes of box; afterwards of Melibæus. To this piece of history Mar- of the leg bones of cranes, horns of animals, tial refers in the following lines:

metals, &c. Hence they are called, avena, Sint Mæcenates, non dcerunt, Flacce, Ma- stipula, calamus, arundo, fistula, buxus, tibia,

cornu, es, &c. Virgiliumque tibi vel tua rura dabunt. 4. The primitive meaning of lentus is Jugera perdiderat miseræ vicina Cremo- slow: but here it implies being at rest, and

at leisure. Flebat et abductas Tityrus äger oves. 5. Amaryllida. By Amaryllis some unRisit Thuscus eques, paupertatemque derstand Rome, and Virgil's friends at malignam

Rome : but there is no occasion for such re. Reppulit, ut celeri jussit abire fuga. finement: the pastoral will appear more Accipe divitias, et vatum maximus esto, beautiful by considering Amaryllis simply Tu licet, et nostrum, dixit, Alexin as the shepherd's mistress, whose praises

he sings at his ease. See Theocritus, Idyl! 1. Fagi. We commonly make the fagus II. the sanie tree as the esculus; but Oyid 9. Errare. To feed at large,

B

rones ;

ne,

ames.

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