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TIBULLUS:

ADAPTED FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS.

BY

JOHN BULMER,
(B.D. DURHAM, MUS. BAC. TRIN. COLL. DUBLIN),

AUTHOR OF “A SUMMARY OF PERSIUS," AND OF TRANSLATIONS
PUBLISHED IN “KOTTABOS," SOMETIME FELLOW AND

LECTURER IN DURHAM UNIVERSITY.

AND

EDWARD BULMER, M.A.,
ASSISTANT CLASSICAL MASTER OF ST. PETER'S SCHOOL, YORK,

LATE FELLOW OF DURHAM UNIVERSITY.

CAMBRIDGE:
JONES & PIGGOTT (LATE RIVINGTONS).

1882.

LONDON: W. KENT & CO, PATERNOSTER ROIC

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1 FED PREFACE.

In preparing these pages for the use of schools, it has been our endeavour (in the absence of school editions of Tibullus) to make them as widely available as possible. We have throughout so intermingled elementary instruction with notes of a more advanced type, that, while many lower divisions in a school will (it is hoped) find sufficient assistance, our commentary may at the same time prove serviceable to higher forms. In affording help, it has not been our desire merely to save trouble,—to supersede either the teacher's work in class, or the learner's application to Dictionary and Grammar, or the necessity of a boy's thinking for himself ; and therefore, where it seemed likely that the usual sources would readily supply all needful information, we have, for the most part, been silent ; and in regard to less familiar terms and phrases, we have generally considered it sufficient, by means of an explanatory hint, to suggest, rather than to fix, a rendering.

What we have written is founded on the valuable work of Dissen, whose commentary has been freely drawn upon, especially in regard to quotations ; and wherever (in some very few cases) we have not adhered to his text, the divergence has been duly pointed out. From the text of Tibullus those portions, which

PREFACE.

may reasonably be objected to as unsuited for a school-book, have been expunged ; while, on the other hand, we have been careful to avoid unnecessary abridgment. The present text (Bk. I.) comprises the following : 1. 1–44, 49—72, 75 to end ; 2. 45– 56, 61 to end ; 3. 1—24, 27 to end ; 4. 15–38, 41–52, 61—66 ; 5. 146, 9—36, 67 to end ; 6. 43—to end ; 7. the whole ; 8. 9— 24 ; 9. 7-18, 23–38 ; 10. the whole.

Our nuineration of the lines is continuous, and is merely intended to assist reference to the notes. The introduction has been kindly given to us by the Rev. JAMES G. LONSDALE, M.A., late Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford, and Tutor in Durham University, to whom we have also to record our thanks for several valuable hints in the compilation of the Notes.

J. B.
E.B.

INTRODUCTION.

THE date of the birth of Tibullus is uncertain, though in the Third Book, Elegy V. 19, it is positively asserted that he was born in the same year as Ovid, B.C. 53. His uneventful life affords but scanty materials for the biographer. From a father of equestrian rank he inherited a good landed property, acres of corn-land and of pasture, “enough for his own wants, only too many for the thief and wolf' (Laudes Messalae, 185); but, like Virgil, he suffered from agrarian division ; like Virgil, he met with a friend in distress. His patron was Messala Corvinus, a friend of Horace, by whom he is mentioned as a distinguished orator, This Messala had been third in command at the battle of Philippi, but was admitted to the friendship of Augustus, preserving however a bold and independent bearing, never afraid to confess that he had been Cassius' lieutenant. He was an author, but his writings, composed according to Seneca in pure latinity, are all lost. Tibullus accompanied him on his expedition into Gaul, and afterwards followed him into the East, but being taken ill at Corcyra returned home. The poet's estate was at Pedum (probably Zagarola) in Latium, which lay between Tibur (Tivoli) and Praeneste (Palestrina) on the Via Praenestrina, amidst the beautiful scenery of a hilly country. There, as says his friend

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