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second word, a trochee, and a substantive of the tioned by Sir J Herschel. They were numersame gender and number, always beginning with ous on Eina, and filled with black hornblende. a consonant; the third, an iambic, of an adverbi. He supposed those of Aristarchus, the white al signification; the fourth, a verb of the third streams, were feldspar.-Lit. Guz. person plural, consisting of tree long syllables ; ihe fifth and sixth, a dactyl and spondee, of Singular PHENOMENON — At the last meeting similar construction with the first and second of the British Association, Sir D Brewster dewords, and with which they can be transposed scribed the existence of crystals in the cavities of without altering the structure of the verse. Now topaz, which melted under the influeuce of heat. for the experiments. Of the above four verses In pursuing this investigation, he observed a phewrite down the twenty-four words on as many nomenon produced by heat of the most novel loose slips of paper, numbering their respective and surprising kind, and one which he felt himplaces in the line from 1 10 6; and at every trans- self utlerly unable to explain Upon the first apposition of the slips, you will produce a new verse plication of heat, one or two of the crystals leaped correct in grammar and prosody, though some from their resting.place, and darted to the oppotimes equivocal in sense. Increase the number site side of the cavity In a few seconds the others of words, similarly formed, to twenty or thirty quitted their places, one after the other, performfor each line; and you will then have ihe means ing the most rapid and extraordinary rotations. of forming some thousands of hexameter lines, as One crystal joined another, and four of them fast as you can shuffle and distribute the slips, thus united revolved with such rapidity as comwithout the probability of the same verse ever re- pletely to eflace their respective shapes. They curring a second time. For school-boys and Lat. separated on the withdrawal of the heat, and took in students, it may be a very curious and instruc- the position which their gravity assigned to them. tive amusement, but nothing more. It is on Prisms also performed the same rotation; and this simple principle, and not by letters, as affirm- the small crystals have been driven between the ed, that the “Eureka" constructs its verse; inclined edges of the cavity The pyro-electricity which can be as readily perforined in the way I of topaz suggests itself as a moving power : it may have described, as by the machine. . Yours, &c., produce attractions and repulsions, or certain mó-Athenaum.

P. A. Nuttall. tions in straight lines; but how could it turn a crys

tal on its axis? The experiments of Libri and Fres

nel on the repulsions which heated bodies exert MODEL OF THE Moon—Sir John Herschel, in pon each other at sensible distances, afford but tbe British Association, exhibited and enlarged

little aid. They may assist to account for the mere upon the exceedingly beautiful model of ihe displacement of the crystals by the application of moon, the work of a female amateur astronomer. beat, or for their sudden start from their places of The figures of the mountains in relief were all rest, but they do not supply a force fitted to give taken by micrometrical measurements, and their and to sustain a rapid rotatory movement Why precision in the model was most marvellous: the the crystals rotate is not known.-Lit. Gaz. material employed was a composition of mastic and wax. In speaking of the atmosphere of the

Paging MACHINE -A machine designed to moon, Sir John Herschel again referred to the page account books has been recently patented probable altered character of the heat reflected by Mr. W. Shaw, of Liverpool. The machine, from the moon He said, that during a fort- which occupies a space less ihan three feet square, night's unmitigated day the moon must grow im- is so constructed as to number the pages of a book, mensely hot, but that we had no experiinents to whether bound or unbound, progressively, from show this, and probably, though the heat may one to ten thousand;—the simple movement of a not be in a condition to penetrate our atmosphere, lever performing the combined operations of yet it may tend to clear it. He did not insist up- taking and distributing ink, transferring the same on this, but thought it highly probable, and in to the figures, making the impression, and changstanced in support of this view the remarkable ing the figures to the succeeding number. The quantity of clear sky prevailing just about full machine, it should be remarked, is equally appli

The effect of this strong heat must be to cable to the numbering of bank notes, and railway evaporate all water; and if any remain, it must

tickets.-Athenaum, exist on the hinder part, and perhaps in the state of ice. Besides several other prominent and well- PROFESSOR Buckland's HYENA.-Professor known mountains, Sir John pointed out Aristar- Buckland has had for some time in his posseschus, which glows at different times with a pe- sion the bones of an animal discovered in a cave. culiar reflection, and which has been repeatedly He believes them to be those of the hyena; but mistaken for a volcano. A great many streaks not being quite certain on the point, we must pre down its sides are visible : these are not lava- sume, he bespoke the skeleton of an old hyena, streams, but lava-cracks filled with other matter. now in the Surrey Zoological Gardens, and This and other peculiarities of the lunar craters which became the properly of Mr. Cross more resemble those of our earth, and reference was than thirty years ago, in order that he may comespecially made for proof to the Baron Walter- pare bis bones with those found in the cave. The shausen's map of Erna.

old hyena is, however, perverse, and will not die The Baron said that in the moon there were 10 gratify Professor Buckland. The Professor two different systems of mountains : 1. mountain called at the Gardens some short time since to chains, not so extensive as those of the earth ; 2 inquire after his subject; he found him alive and craters elliptic and circular, larger and more per- healthy “He may survive myself,' said the fectly constructed. He pointed out the perfect Professor; and thus it may be that a great geoloanalógies between the lunar and terrestrial vol-gical theory is kept in suspense by the perverse canic formations, and especially the cracks men vitality of an old hyena.- Spectator.

moon.

efits of vaccination, and consequently producing | SELECT LIST OF RECENT PUBLICATIONS. . an annual saving of from 15,000 to 20,000 lives, all will admit that an annual grant of £5000 or £6000, which would probably cover the expenses

GREAT BRITAIN. of such establishments, would be well bestowed.

The subject is well worth the attention of the The World Surveyed in the Nineteenth Legislature, and Dr. Stark deserves praise, both Century, by W. D. Cooley. for the otject, and the execution, of his inquiry ;

Twelve Hundred Questions and Answers although, until a few of the First-born of Egypt are swept away by small-pox during some viru. on the Bible, intended principally for the lent epidemic, Wisdom will, too probably, lift up use of Schools and Young Persons, by M. her voice in vain.— Tuit's Magazine.

11. and J. H. Myers.

Credit the Life of Commerce, by J. H.

Elliott. The Chemistry of Vegetable and Animal Physiology. By Dr. G. J. Muider. Translated from

Jacob's Ladder: Eighteen Practical Adthe Dutch. Part I.

dresses, by Rev. George Oliver, D. D. So far as it can be judged or by a fragment like

Abercrombie's (John) Pathological and the present, this work promises io be a very val. Practical Researches on Diseases of the uable contribution to 200-chemistry: The sci. Brain and the Spinal Cord, 4th edit. ence is one the importance of which is universal.

Ilarrison's (Rev. B.) Historical Enquiry ly admitted ; and one, too, of whose fundamental into the Interpretation of the Rubric. principles and laws we are as yet profoundly. is. norant. With regard to the very first principle

History of our Own Times, by the auin the science-are the molecular forces of inor- thor of Court and Times of Frederick the ganic nature sufficient to explain the phenomena Great.' of organized being; or are we entitled from these

M'Farlan's (J. M.) Version of the Prophenomena to deduce the existence in the latter of a peculiar force, supereeding or modifying phecies of Ezekiel, retaining the Order of those of the former-chemi-ts and physiologists the Hebrew Original. are at issue alike with each other, and among Thiers' History of the Consulate and themselves. Dr. Mulder adopts the first, and we Empire, translated by D. F. Campbell, Esq. believe the less prevalent, of these views; and Vol. IV. (Colburn's Edition). shows with much originality and clearness, how entirely unwarranted by facts is the assumption of a so-called vital force; and how perfecily adequate the chemical forces of inorganic mature are

GERMANY. to achieve the most complex phenomena of ani. mal and vegetable life. The present portion of

Geschichte der Philosophie. Von Dr. the work is for the most part introductory ; treating of these chemical forces, and of the atmos

H. Ritter, Thiel 7. phere, water and the soil, in their general rela- Dante und die Katholische Philosophie tions to organic nature. Till the specific applica- des dreizehnten Jahrhunderts. Von A. F. tions of the views propounded are before us, it Ozanam. were premature to pronounce any judgment more

Fr. Schleiermacher's literarischer Nachspecial than this—that the author exbibits qualifications for his task of no common order; possesses

lass zur Theologie. much of that openness of mind, without which Chrestomathia Persica. Von F. Spiegel. the man who searches into nature will find only Inscriptiones græcæ ineditæ. Colleg. himself and his prejudications; and of that fear. edit. L. Rosino. Fasc. III. lessness of speculation whicb, when conjoined, as

Lexicon latino-græcum.

Von H. N. in bim, with accuracy of observation and fidelity of induction, has been the true instrument of hu- Ulrichs. man discovery:

The tran-lation bears marks of being faithfully executed; though we must regret that clearness should not unfrequently be sacrificed in the attempt to preserve the construction and idioms of Cours de Microscopie complementaire the original. Occasionally, too, manifest errors des études medicales. Par Donné et Fouof rendering occur-as, for instance, one of the sections is headed, ' Apparent quiescence of the cault. Liv. I. et II, forces during combination;' the true reading evi.

Recherches sur les établissemens des dently being, . Apparent rendering quiescent, or Grecs en Sicile. Par Brunet de Treale. neutralization of the forces by combination.'— Histoire des Cabinets de l'Europe pen

dant le Consulat et l'Empire. Par Lefeb

FRANCE.

vre.

Civilisation primitive; ou, Essai de restitution de la période Anti-historique, pourservir d'introduction à l'Historie Universelle. Par F. de Brotonne.

norant.

efits of vaccination, and consequently producing |SELECT LIST OF RECENT PUBLICATIONS. an annual saving of from 15,000 to 20,000 lives, all will admit that an annual grant of £5000 or £6000, which would probably cover the expenses

GREAT BRITAIN. of such establishments, would be well bestowed.

The subject is well worth the attention of the The World Surveyed in the Nineteenth Legislature, and Dr. Stark deserves praise, both Century, by W. D. Cooley. for the otject, and the execution, of bis inquiry ;

Twelve Hundred Questions and Answers although, until a few of the First-born of Egypı are swept away by smali-pox during some viru- on the Bible, intended principally for the lent epidemic, Wisdom will, too probably, lift up use of Schools and Young Persons, by M. her voice in vain.— Tuit's Magazine.

II. and J. H. Myers.

Credit the Life of Commerce, by J. H.

Elliott. The Chemistry of Vegetable and Animal Physiology. By Dr. G. J. Muider. Translated from

Jacob's Ladder: Eighteen Practical Adthe Dulch. Part I.

dresses, by Rev. George Oliver, D. D. So far as it can be judged or by a fragment like

Abercrombie's (John) Pathological and the present, this work promises to be a very val. Practical Researches on Diseases of the uable contribution to zoo-chemistry. The sci- Brain and the Spinal Cord, 4th edit. ence is one the importance of which is universal.

Harrison's (Rev. B.) Historical Enquiry ly admitted ; and one, too, of whose fundamental principles and laws we are as yet profoundly ig.

into the Interpretation of the Rubric. With regard to the very first principle

History of our Own Times, by the auin the science-are the molecular forces of inor- thor of Court and Times of Frederick the ganic nature sufficient to explain the phenomena Great.' of organized being; or are we entitled from these

M'Farlan's (J. M.) Version of the Prophenomena to deduce the existence in the latter of a peculiar force, superseding or modifying phecies of Ezekiel, retaining the Order of those of the former-chemi-ts and physiologists the Hebrew Original. are at issue alike with each other, and ainong Thiers' History of the Consulate and themselves. Dr. Mulder adopts the first, and we Empire, translated by D. F. Campbell, Esq. shows with much originality and clearness, how Vol

. IV. (Colburn's Edition). entirely unwarranted by facts is the assumption of a so-called vital force; and how perfecily adequate the chemical forces of inorganic nature are to achieve the most complex phenomena of ani. mal and vegetable life. The present portion of Geschichte der Philosophie. Von Dr. the work is for the most part introductory; treating of these chemical forces, and of the atmos

H. Ritter, Thiel 7. phere, water and the soil, in their general rela

Dante und die Katholische Philosophie iions to organic nature. Till the specific applica- des dreizehnten Jahrhunderts. Von A. F. tions of the views propounded are before us, it Ozanam. were premature to pronounce any judgment more

Fr. Schleiermacher's literarischer Nachspecial than this—that the author exbibits qualifi. cations for his task of no common order; possesses

lass zur Theologie. much of that openness of mind, without wbich Chrestomathia Persica. Von F. Spiegel. the man who searches into nature will find only Inscriptiones græcæ ineditæ. Colleg. himself and his prejudications; and of that fear. edit. L. Rosino. Fasc. III. lessness of speculation which, when conjoined, as

Lexicon latino-græcum.

Von H. N. in him, with accuracy of observation and fidelity of induction, has been the true instrument of hu- Ulrichs. man discovery.

The translation bears marks of being faithfully executed; though we must regret that clearness should not unfrequently be sacrificed in the attempt to preserve the construction and idioms of Cours de Microscopie complementaire the original. Occasionally, too, manifest errors des études medicales. Par Donné et Fouof rendering occur-as, for instance, one of the sections is headed, ' Apparent quiescence of the cault

. Liv. I. et II. forces during combination ;' the true reading evi

Recherches sur les établissemens des dently being, ' Apparent rendering quiescent, or Grecs en Sicile. Par Brunet de Treale. neutralization of the forces by combination.'- Histoire des Cabinets de l'Europe pen

dant le Consulat et l'Empire. Par Lefeb

GERMANY.

FRANCE.

vre.

Civilisation primitive; ou, Essai de restitution de la période Anti-historique, pourservir d'introduction à l'Historie Universelle. Par F. de Brotonne.

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