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to me.

sent for him; that colonel Anderson's business was to obtain his intera ference, to put a stop to further proceedings on the subject of his letter

The precise conversation between Mr. Wilson and colonel Anderson, can be related by the former with minuteness. (Signed)

LEWIS WILLIAMS. January 7th, 1818.

The said letter and statement being read;

On motion of Mr. Forsyth, Resolved, unanimously, that Mr. Speaker do issue his warrant, directed to the sergeant at arms attending this House, commanding him to take into custody, wherever to be found, the body of John Anderson, and the same in his custody to keep, subject to the further order and direction of this House.

A warrant pursuant to the said resolution was accordingly prepared, signed by Mr. Speaker under his seal, attested by the Clerk, and delivered to the sergeant with orders forthwith to execute the same, and make due return thereof to the House.

An engrossed bill, entitled “ An act allowing compensation to the members of the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States, and the delegates of the territories, and repealing all other laws on that subject," was read the third time; and being on its passage;

Mr. Harrison submitted the following resolution:

Resolved, That the said bill be recommitted to the select committee which reported it, and that they be instructed so to amend the same, as to limit the compensation of the members of the present Congress to six dollars per diem, and the same allowance for every twenty miles in going and returning to the seat of government, and to the members of the succeeding Congresses eight dollars

per diem.

And passed in the affirmative, {Nay...

A division of the question on this motion, was called for by Mr. Poindexter, and being taken on the first part thereof, to wit: shall the said bill be recommitted to the select committee?

It was determined in the negative.
The question was then taken, shall the said bill pass?

Yeas...................... 109,

Nays.....................60. The yeas and nays being required by one-fifth of the members present,

Those who voted in the adfirmative, are
Mr. Abbott,
Mr. Austin,

Mr. Bloomfield,
Adams,
Ball,

Bryan,
Allen, Mass.
Barber, Ohio,

Butler,
Allen, Vt.
Bateman,

Clagett,
Anderson, Pen.
Bayley,

Claiborne,
Anderson, Ken Beecher,

Colston,

Mr. Comstock, Mr. Kirtland,
Cook,

Lawyer,
Crafts,

Linn,
Crawford,

Little,
Cruger,

Lowndes,
Culbreth,

W. Maclay,
Cushinan,

W. P. Maclay,
Darlington,

M'Coy,
Drake,

Marchand,
Farle,

Mason, Massa
Ellicott,

Merrill,
Floyd,

Middleton,
Forney,

Moore,
Forsyth,

Moseley,
Fuller,

Jer. Nelson,
Gage,

H. Nelson,
Garnett,

T. M. Nelson,
Hale,

Nesbitt,
Hall, Del.

Orr,
Hall, N. c.

Owen,
Herkimer,

Palmer,
Hitchcock,

Parrott,
Hogg,

Patterson,
Holmes, Con.

Pawling,
Hopkinson,

Peter,
Hubbard,

Pindall,
Hunter,

Pitkin,
Irving, N. r.

Pleasants,
Johnson, Ken.

Porter,
Jones,

Rich,
Kinsey,

Those who voted in the negative, are Mr. Baldwin,

Mr. Hiester,
Barbour, Va.

Holmes, Mass.
Bassett,

Huntington,
Bellinger,

Lewis,
Bennett,

Livermore,
Blount,

M'Laney
Bodon,

Marr,
Boss,

Mercer,
Burwell,

Miller,
Campbell,

Morton,
Cobb,

Mumford,
Desha,

Murray,
Edwards,

New,
Ervin, S. C.

Ogle,
Folger,

Parris,
Harrison,

Poindexter,
Hasbrouck,

Quarles,
Hendricks,

Reed,
Herbert,

R!loa,
Herrick,

Ross,

Mr. Richards,

Ringvold,
Robertson, Ken:
Robertson, Lori.
Ruggles,
Savage,
Schuyler,
Scudder,
Settle,
Slocumb,
Alex. Smyth
Spangler,
Speed,
Storrs,
Strong,
Stuart,
Tallmadge;
Tarr,
Terrell,
Terry,
Tompkins,
Townsend,
'Tucker, Va.
Upham,
Walker, N. C.
Wallace,
Wendover,
Williams, NY.
Wilkin,
Wilson, Pen.

109

Mr. Sampson,

Sawyer
Shaw,
Sherwood,
Silsbee,
S. Smith,
Bal. Smith,
J. S. Smith,
Southard,
Spencer,
Strother,
Taylor,
Trimble,
Tucker, S.C.
Tyler,
Walker, Ken
Whiteside,
Whitman,
Williams, Con.
Williams, N. C. 60

Ordered, That the title be as aforesaid, and that the Clerk carry the said bill to the Senate and ask their concurrence therein.

The House resolved itself into a committee of the whole, on the bill making appropriations for repairing the public buildings; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Pitkin reported the same with an amendment; which was read and concurred in by the House.

Ordered, That the said bill be engrossed and read a third time to-morrow.

The House resolved itself into a committee of the whole, on the bill to prescribe the effect which certain records and judicial proceedings of the courts of each state shall have in every other state, and in the courts of the United States; and after some time spent therein, Mr. Speaker resumed the chair, and Mr. Smith, of Maryland, reported that the committee had made further progress therein, and directed him to ask leave to sit again.

Ordered, That the committee of the whole have leave to sit again on the said bill.

And then the House adjourned.

THURSDAY, January 8, 1818.

Another member, to wit: from New York, David A. Ogden, appeared, produced his credentials and took his seat; the oath to support the constitution of the United States, being first administered to him by Mr. Speaker.

On motion of Mr. Parrott, Ordered, That the petition of sundry merchants of Portsmouth in New Hampshire, presented on the 15th February, 1817; and,

On motion of Mr. Nelson, of Massachusetts, Ordered, That the petition of sundry merchants and other inhabitants of Newburyport, in Massachusetts, presented on the 2d January, 1817, be referred to the committee appointed yesterday on the petition of sundry merchants of Philadelphia.

Mr. Smith, of Maryland, presented a petition of sundry merchants of Baltimore, of a similar nature to that presented yesterday, from sundry merchants of Philadelphia, which petition from the merchants of Baltimore, was also referred to the last mentioned committee.

Mr. Whitman presented a petition of sundry merchants of Belfast, in the District of Maine, praying for the establishment of an uniform system of bankruptcy, which was referred to the committee of the whole on the bill for that purpose.

Mr. Folger presented a petition of sundry inhabitants of Eastham, in the state of Massachusetts, praying that a light house may be erected on the southwest part of Billinsgate Point.

Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the committee of Commerce and Manufactures.

On motion of Mr. Ball,
Ordered, That the petition of sundry inhabitants of the Nor-

thern Neck of Virginia, presented on the 23d July, 1313, be referred to the same committee.

On motion of Mr. Moseley Ordered, That the petition of Andrew Law, presented on the 1st February, 1816, be referred to a select committee; and,

Mr. Mosely, Mr. Hitchcock, and Mr. Huntington, were appointed the said committee.

Mr. Spencer presented a petition of sundry inhabitants of the towns of Phelps, Farmington, Palmyra, and Perrinton, in the state of New York; and a petition of sundry inhabitants of the towns of Steuben, Alleghany, and Cattaragus, in the said state, respectively praying for the establishment of post routes.

Mr. Robertson, of Kentucky, presented a petition of Daniel Barbee, postmaster in the town of Danville, in the state of Kentucky, praying for an increase of his compensation. Ordered, That the said

petitions be referred to the committee on the Post Office and Post Roads.

Mr. Savage presented a petition of Stephen Clapp, an officer in the revolutionary army, praying that the commutation of the half pay, to which he was entitled for his services as aforesaid, may now be allowed and paid to him.

Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the committee on Pensions and Revolutionary Claims.

Mr. Robertson, of Kentucky, presented a petition of Cornelius Taylor, praying for a pre-emption right in the purchase of a tract of land on which he resides, lying in the territory of Illinois.

Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the committee on Private Land Claims.

Mr. Robertson, of Louisiana, presented a petition of Charles Smith, praying to be permitted to purchase, at two dollars per acre, a certain tract of public ground in the state of Louisiana, on which he proposes at his own expense to erect a church and a school house, for the use and convenience of the inhabitants of that part of the country.

Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the committee on the Public Lands.

On motion of Mr. Holmes, of Massachusetts, Ordered, That the petitions of Joseph Cutts, presented on the 14th February, 1816, and the 15th March, 1816, be severally referred to the committee of Claims.

The Speaker presented petitions from windry inhabitants of the territory of Missouri, praying that the said territory may be crected into a state, and admitted into the Union, on an equal footing with the original states.

Ordered, That the said petitions lie on the table.

The Speaker laid before the House sundry documents, in relation to the contested election of Charles F. Mercer, one of the Representatives for the state of Virginia.

Ordered, That the said documents be referred to the committee of Elections.

Ordered, That the committee on Pensions and Revolutionary Claims be discharged from a further opnsideration of the petition of Daniel Fisher, and that it be referred to the Secretary of War.

Mr. Spencer, from the committee to whom was referred the petition of the Tuscarora tribe of Indians, made a report thereon, which was read; and the resolution therein contained, was concur. red in by the House, as follows:

Resolved, That the prayer of the petitioners ought not to be granted.

Mr. Plesants, from the committee on Naval Affairs, reported a bill authorizing John Taylor to be placed on the list of navy pensioners; which was read the first and second time, and committed to a committee of the whole to-morrow,

On motion of Mr. Linn, Resolved, That a committee be appointed to inquire into the expediency of establishing by law, a standard of weights and measures; and,

Mr. Linn, Mr. Pitkin, Mr. Seybert, Mr. Lowndes, and Mr. Ogden, were appointed the said comiittee.

The following resolution submitted by Mr. Walker, of North Carolina, was read and ordered to lie on the table.

Resolved, That it is expedient to inquire whether any, and if any, what alteration is necessary in the several laws now in force, to make a further provision for the purpose of issuing warrants to the soldiers of the late army of the United States, in order to obtain their patents for their military bounty lands, promised to them at their enlistment; and that this subject be submitted to the committee on Military Affairs.

Mr. Livermore submitted the following resolution:

Resolved, That the committee on Private Land Claims be in. structed to inquire, whether in any case, further time than is already prescribed by law, ought to be allowed for the redemption of lands, sold for direct taxes, and purchased by collectors in behalf of the United States, pursuant to law.

On motion of Mr. Poindexter, The said resolution was amended by directing the inquiry to be made by the committee of Ways and Means, instead of the committee on Private Land Claims.

On motion of Mr. Rich, The said resolution was then further amended, by adding thereto the following:

“ And that the said committee be also instructed to inquire into the expediency of making provision by law, to enable persons whose lands may have been sold for the payment of the direct tax, to redeem the same by paying such sum only, as said lands shall be justly charged with, together with reasonable costs and interests."

The said resolution was then agreed to as amended.

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