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Ordered, That the said petitions be referred to the committee on Pensions and Revolutionary Claims.

Mr. Irving, of New York, presented a petition of William W. Hladdock, and Thomas W.Jenkins, merchants of New York, stating, that, whilst their ship was proceeding from Wales to New York, with a cargo of slate, she was compelled by stress of weather to put into Halifax, and was there found to be so disabled, as to render it necessary to transfer the cargo to other vessels, which they did, and as there was no American vessels in port, they were compelled to employ British, and that upon the arrival of the said cargo in New York, it was charged with foreign duty and light money on f reign vessels, and as the voyage was expensive and disastrous, they pray that they may not be compelled to pay other charges, than they would have paid, had their own vessel brought the cargo into the United States.

Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the committee of Ways and Means.

Mr. Palmer presented a petition of sundry inhabitants of Clinton county in the state of New York, praying for the establishment of a post route.

Mr. Cushman presented a petition of sundry , inhabitants of Troy in the state of New York, also praying for the establishment of a post route.

Ordered, That the said petitions be referred to the committee on the Post Office and Post Roads.

Mr. Palmer also presented a petition of Allen R. Moare, praying compensation for damages committed on his property, while the same was in the occupation of the troops of the United States, and that he may be paid for other property belonging to him, and destroyed, by order of general Macomb, during the military operations in and near Plattsburg, in the late war with Great Britain.

Mr. Bloomfield presented a similar petition of Henry Delord, of Plattsburg aforesaid.

Mr. Spangler presented a petition of William Barber, administrator on the estate of Conrad Laub, deceased, praying that he may be paid the compensation promised, by the proper officer to the said Laub, for extra services performed by him while a collector of internal duties.

Ordered, That the said petitions be referred to the committee of Claims.

Mr. Bloomfield presented a petition of Lewis J. Costigan, praying compensation for services rendered as an officer in the revolutionary army.

Nir. İlerrick presented a petition of George Reynolds, also praying compensation for services rendered as an officer in the revolutionary alry.

Ordered, That the said petitions be referred to the committee appointed on that part of the President's message, which relates to the Surviving Oficers and Soldiers of the Revolutionary army.

Mr. Hopkinson presented a petition of sundry merchants and underwriters in the city of Philadelphia, praying to be paid the amount of certain claims, which they held upon the government of France, for spoliations on their lawful commerce by the cruizers of that nation, prior to the year 1800, as by a treaty made subsepuently to that period, their said claims have been abandoned by the government of the United States; which petition was referred to a select committee; and,

Mr. Hopkinson, Mr. Smith, of Maryland, Mr. Middleton, Mr. Williams, of Connecticut, and Mr. Mason, of Massachusetts, were appointed the said committee.

Mr. Middleton presented a similar petition from the merchants and underwriters in Charleston, South Carolina, which was referred to the committee last mentioned.

Mr. Harrison presented a petition of Charles Reaum, praying compensation for losses sustained by depredations on his property by the British and Indians during the late war.

Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the committre appointed on a petition froin sundry inhabitants of the river Raisin.

On motion of Mr. Poindexter, Ordered, That the petitions of the heirs of John Baptiste Baudreau, presented on the 18th January, 1815, and 14th December, 1815; and,

The petition of John Burnett, senr. presented on the 6th December, 1816, be referred to the committee on Private Land Claims.

Mr. Poindexter presented a petition of Diego M.Voy, praying that his title to a tract of land, in the territory of Alabaina may be confirmed.

Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the committee on Private Land Claims.

On motion of Mr. Scott, Ordered, That the petition of John Brickcy, presented on the 17th December, 1816, be referred to the same committee.

On motion of Mr. Scott, Ordered, That the petition of Archibald M.Donald, presente! on the 24th January, 1817, be referred to the committee on Military Affairs; and that the petition of John and Sarah Thompson, presented on the uth December, 1816, be referred to the compittee on Pensions and Revolutionary Claims.

Mr. Robertson, from the committee on Public Lands, made a report on the petition of sundry inhabitants of Marthasville, in the territory of Missouri, which was read; and the resolution therein contained, was concurred in by the House as follows:

Resolved, That the prayer of the petitioners ought not to be granted.

Mr. Robertson made a report on the petition of Nathaniel Cutting, which was read; and the resolution therein contained, was concurred in by the House as follows:

Resolved, That the prayer of the petitioner ought not to be granted.

A motion was made by Mr. Rhea, that the committee on Pensions and Revolutionary Claims be discharged from the further consideration of the petition of Samuel Tucker; which motion was rejected by the House.

Ön motion of Mr. Mercer, Resolved, That a committee be appointed to inquire into the expediency of causing to be printed, the secret journals of the proceedings of the Congress of the United States, down to the treaty of peace in 1783, together with the correspondence of the government of the United States, with the ministers and agents thereof in foreign countries, down to the same period of time.

Resolved, That the same committee be also instructed to inquire into the expediency of causing to be printed the journal of the general convention, which framed the constitution of the United States, and that the committee have leave to report by bill or otherwise.

Mr. Mercer, Mr. Baldwin, Mr. Forsyth, Mr. Pleasants, and Mr. Spencer, were appointed the said committee.

The Ilouse took up the unfavorable report of the committee on Pensions and Revolutionary Claims, on the petition of Edmund Broke: when

A motion was made by Mr. Barbour, of Virginia, to amend the resolution contained in the said report, so as tu niake it read “ That the prayer of the petitioner is reasonable and ought to be granted." wherefore, it was

Ordered, That the said report be committed to a committee of the whole on Monday next.

The Speaker laid before the House a letter from the Secretary of the Navy, transmitting a statement of the expenditure and application of the moneys drawn from the Treasury, on account of the navy, during the year ending 30th September, 1817, and of the unexpended balances of former appropriations; which was ordered to lie on the table.

The Speaker, also laid before the House, another letter from the Secretary of the Navy, transmitting a statement of contracts, made by the Commissioners of the Navy Board, during the year 1817; which was ordered to lie on the table.

The Speaker, also laid before the House, another letter from the Secrétary of the Navy, transmitting two statements, which show the names of the clerks in the Navy Department, and in the office of the Commissioners of the Navy Board during the year 1817, witin the compensation paid to each; which was ordered to lie on the table.

A message from the Senate, by Mr. Cutts, their Secretary.

Mr. Speaker: The Senate have passed bills from this House of the following titles, to wit:

An act to remit the duty on a painting, presented to the Pennsylvania Hospital,

An act for the relief of Samuel Aikman: and
An act for the relief of Joel Earwood:

With amendments on the two latter, in which they ask the concurrence of this House. And then he withdrew.

The said amendments were read and severally referred to the committee on the Public Lands.

The following resolution was submitted by Mr. Rich, which was read, and ordered to lie on the table.

Resolved, That during the remainder of the session, the House shall adjourn to meet at eleven o'clock in the morning.

Mr. Williams, of North Carolina, laid before the House the following letter and statement:

Washington City, 6th January, 1818.

The Honorable Lewis Williams:

Honored Sir,

I return you thanks for the attention I received on my claims to pass so soon.

Mr. Lee, will hand some claims from the river Raisin, which will pass through your honorable committee, and I have a wish that the conduct of the British in that country, may be related in full on the floor of Congress; which will give you some trouble in making out the report, and supporting the same.

I have now to request that you will accept of the small sum of five hundred dollars, as part pay for the extra trouble I give you. I will present it to you so soon as I receive some from government. This is confidential, that only you and me may know any thing about it; or, in other words, I give it to you as a man and a mason, and hope you belong to that society. Sir, should it happen that you will not accept of this small sum, I request you will excuse me. If you do not accept I wish you to drop me a few lines. If you accept I wish no answer. I hope you will see my view on this object, that it is for extra trouble.

I will make out a statement and present the same to the committee, which will be supported by general Harrison, colonel Johnson, Mr. Halbard, Mr. Meigs, post master general, governor Cass's report, as commissioner, and others. Relying on your honor as to keeping this a secret, and your exertions in passing those claims as soon as possible, I need not inform you that we are as poor unfortunate orphan children, having no representation in Congress, so must look on your honorable body as our gurdians. Pardon this liberty from a stranger. I remain with high esteem, your most obedient humble servant. (Signed)

JOHN ANDERSON.

After breakfast this morning, George, a servant, came into the dining room, and told me that a gentleman was in my room waiting to see me. I stepped into my room, and colonel John Anderson was there. He handed me a letter, observing at the same time, that he had prepared that letter for me, and that perhaps it would require some explanation. I read over the letter with attention; and having done so, observed to colonel Anderson it was a very surprizing communication. I then started to Mr. Wilson's room, immediately adjoining my own. When in the act of opening my own door, colonel Ånderson begged I would not show the letter. I made no reply to this, but stepped to Mr. Wilson's rooni and asked him to do me the favor to walk into my room. This Mr. Wilson did, following on immediately behind me. After we had got into my room, in the presence of colonel Änderson, I handed the letter to Mr. Wilson, and observing that it was a very extraordinary communication, requested him to read it. When Mr. Wilson had read, or was nearly done reading the letter, I told colonel Anderson that I repelled with indignation and contempt, the offer he made to me in the letter. Colonel Anderson said, he asked my pardon, that it was designed only as a small compensation for the extra trouble he expected to give the committee of Claims, in examining the claims from the Michigan territory, and exposing the conduct of the British during the war. That it was foreign from his intention to attempt any thing like a bribe, and requested me to burn the letter or to give it to him. I told him I would do neither. That his offence was unpardonable, such as I could not forgive, and ordered him to leave the room instantly. Colonel Anderson then begged pardon and asked forgiveness with excessive earnestness. I told him I would listen to none of his apologies. That his offence was an attack upon the integrity of Congress generally, and upon mine personally and particularly. That no one should ever have my pardon, or expect my forgiveness, who should suppose me capable of such an influence as he had attempted to practise upon me. Again I told colonel Anderson to leave my room. Hc advanced to the door where he stood for some time endeavoring to obtain my pardon, as he said. I told him it was in vain to ask it, that as a member of Congress and of the committee of Claims, it was my duty to examine his claims, and if just, support them, but if unjust, to oppose them. That his offer was an attempt at bribery; was an attempt to influence my mind in opposition to my duty, and as such could not be forgiven. He then desired me either to burn the letter, or give it to him. I replied that I should do neither, and again ordered him to leave my room: whereupon he did leave the room. Mr. Wilson after talking on the subject of the letter for some time, suggested to me the propriety of calling in Mr. William P. Maclay. I stepped to his room, but as Mr. William P. Maclay was not in, I asked Mr. William Maclay, the room mate of Mr. William P, Maclay, to come to my room. He complied with my request; and shortly after we arrived in my room, Mr. William P. Maclay also stepped in. These gentlemen, Mr. Wilson, Nir. William Maclay, and Mr. William P. Maclay were in my room at the time the servant called to Mr. Wilson and said a gentleman was below wishing to see him. Mr. Wilson walked out of the room, and was gone a few minutes. After he returned, he observed that coionel Anderson was ihe person who had

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