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birth and promulgation is hitherto uncertain and very precasious, as it seems to depend on the number and generosity of our Author's goslips. But whatever their fate or appearance may prove, this new Theory, as he calls it, is the microfcopic animalcular system of seminal homunculi and feminella; in attempting to establih and illustrate which, he has, very undefignedly, exposed many of the absurdi: ies attending it'; and in this respect, has certainly overshot his mark. This system then, which Dr. J. C. supposes he has prettily improved, seems a false inference from fome active atoms, falts, or animalcules discovered by microscopes in an animal Auid. But it appears equally reasonable to imagine those animalcules which have been discovered in infusions of pepper, of hay, and of other vegetables, and the paste-eels, to be groves of pepper, and pasture or corn fields in fieri, as, to infer the hypothesis that has arose from the similar appearance in a human fuid. Nevertheless, a passion for physiological discoveries and doctrines, and an unwillingness to acquiesce in such a process of generation asimplies the notorious Thallowneis of human penetration, has greatly contributed to make even fome ingenious and learned men fwailow all the indigeftible crudities of this homuncular theory: which, upon the whole, feems not much more probable, ihan our own supposition, that certain microscopical margots in our Author's brain, are the material feminal cause of all he already has brought forth, or shall produce, on this subject. He condescends to applaud the great Harvey's discovery of omnia ex cv; acknowleging he has found out the nest of human nature, which was half the business, one sine quo non; but observes, how much more he could have taught Harvey, if he had lived in our Author's day, by replenishing the nest for him.

Had this delicate fubject been treated even with the utmost decency and address, we should have judged it improper to prefent our general Readers with any confiderable extracts from it. But as it is a strange rhapsody of religious ejaculation, and of indecent ideas, not terms; of tedious and irksome tautology, with many crude fuppofitions, very, uncouthly and even ungrammatically exprefied, notwithstanding the interspersion of some Latin and Greek, we assure ourselves that our omitting them will not be disapproved. As the performance abounds in quotations, and sometimes from good Writers, it prevents the book from being always rireTome ; and proves that our Author has learned to read, though

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Ars medendi : Sive Dates et Fires medicamentorum croucun con
Galenicorum quàm Chemicorum in Pharmaior . ""*
Medicorum Londinensis impressa, A. D. 1:45. run unbe
betico exaratæ, atque indice morborum eritellivuitt bortis !
Opera Médici in Comitatu Stafforze. ll. V E

&c.

THIS Staffordshire Pa 26 Tulon no

not oblige us with ts man ir nusiticis
was a Scholiaft she mean a cenar mi r t
der Dr. Boerhaave, and a Sc Iicna 0111i ilete de
Mead; and that he makes sis Sriwina ir 11:55 -
the London Disgenózcort by STICNI Ime it
for the benefit of your P iralls Doreme za
which will also lehet Asanir ,
permits as many Readers as an ac Je
the fize, or Latinisy of it, to 30th. itu mereka un
ter, or amend it, to ser in
very kind, and to make

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tin, at least, very capab e ce or a .
emendation, throughout a haz
his work consists.

In other respects this fames - - -
ing all those circumstances of the ..,
operation, of the officinal Correo
had thought proper, and character. "

selves, to omit; as they intended tritis,
for a body of medicinal Compositions, ** '
Apothecaries, how to prepare and comporta
reat, to dose, or apply them. Hence we
Posfician to be in his very Novitiate, w,a, .
Ion 1 SEC"!! to this performance; this item
CX750ies, and some youngsters

birth and promulgation is hitherto uncertain and very precarious, as it seems to depend on the number and generosity of our Author's goffips. But whatever their fate or appearance may prove, this new Theory, as he calls it, is the microfcopic animalcular system of seminal homunculi and feminella ; in attempting to establish and illustrate which, he has, very undefignedly, exposed many of the absurdi ies attending it'; and in this respect, has certainly overshot his mark. This fystem then, which Dr. J. C. supposes he has prettily inproved, seems a false inference from some active atoms, falts, or animalcules discovered by microscopes in an animal Auid. But it appears equally reasonable to imagine those animalcules which have been discovered in infusions of pepper, of hay, and of other vegetables, and the paste-eels, to be groves of pepper, and pasture or corn fields in fieri, as, to infer the hypothesis that has arose from the fuilar appearance in a human fuid. Nevertheless, a passion for physiological discoveries and doctrines, and an unwillingness to acquiesce in such a process of generation asiinplies the notorious shallowness of human penetration, has greatly contributed to make even fome ingenious and learned men swallow all the indigeftible crudities of this homuncular theory : which, upon the whole, feems not much more probable, than our own supposition, that certain microscopical macgots in our Author's brain, are the material feminal cause of all he already has brought forth, or thall produce, on this subject. He condescends to applaud the great Harvey's discovery of omnia ex cui; acknowleging he has found out the nest of human nature, which was half the business, one sine quo non; but observes, how much more he could have taught Harvey, if he had lived in our Author's day, by replenishing the nest for him.

Had this delicate subject been treated even with the utmost decency and address, we should have judged it improper to prefent our general Readers with any confiderable extracts from it. But as it is a strange rhapsody of religious ejaculation, and of indecent ideas, not terms; of tedious and irksome tautology, with many crude suppositions, very, uncouthly and even ungrammatically exprefice, notwithstanding the interspersion of some Latin and Greek, we assure ourselves that our omitting them will not be disapproved. As the performance abounds in quotations, and sometimes from good Writers, it prevents the book from being always tireLome; and proves that our Author has learned to read, though

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he is very little advanced in writing. So that if he does not considerably mend his hand, or rather his head, in the subsequent volumes, to be gleaned from Lieuwenhoek, and all the Authors he can procure, he will certainly incur such a censure as Terence passed on one of his cotemporary Playwrights and Plagiarifts,

Qui ex Græcis bonis Latinas fecit non bonas.

Ars medendi : Sive Dores et Vires medicamentorum omnium tam Galenicorum quàm Chemicorum in Pharmacopeia Collegii regalis Medicorum Londinensis impresa, A. D. 1746. Ordine alphabetico exaratæ, atque indice morborum accommodatæ. Cura et Opera Medici in Comitatu Staffordiæ. Svo. 6s. Waugh,

&c.

T HIS Staffordshire Physician and Translator, who does

not oblige us with his name, says, in his Preface, he was a Scholiaft (he means a Scholar or Pupil] at Leyden, under Dr. Boerhaave, and at St. Thomas's Hospital under Dr. Mead; and that he makes this Scholium or Commentary on the London Dispensatory by the Royal College of Physicians, for the benefit of young Physicians, [Medicinæ Tyronum which will also signify Apothecaries Apprentices. He permits as many Readers as are not pleased with the style, the fize, or Latinity of it, to polisin, add to, retrench, alter, or amend it, to their own liking. This is certainly very kind, and to make it still more so, he has left his Latin, at least, very capable of considerable improvement and emendation, throughout a majority of the 564 pages of which his work consists.

In other respects this same Scholium is executed by publishing all those circumstances of the doses, the virtues, and the operation, of the officinal Compositions which the College had thought proper, and characteristical, with regard to themselves, to omit; as they intended their Dispensatory simply for a body of medicinal Compositions, with Directions to the Apothecaries, how to prepare and compound, not how to direct, to dose, or apply them. Hence we must conclude the Physician to be in his very Novitiate, who has much occa. fion to recur to this performance; tho' it may be useful to country Apothecaries, and some young country Practitioners,

We

We cannot justly consider our medical Translator as a Plagiarist, since he acknowleges, his work to be collected from approved Authors, and experienced Physicians; 'besides some Remarks from his own experience and practice. From the former he sometimes takes, without quoting, particularly from Fuller; tho' the difference of his own Latin will generally diftinguish his style from that of others. He frequently attempts to translate parts of Dr. Lewis's Dispensatory, without naming him; and tho’ the Latin is not often unintelligible, the elegance and purity of the English are seldom preserved in the transfusion. Nevertheless, in the progress of the work, his own expression seems to improve a little, as if it were froin a recollection of what he had formerly been better acquainted with.

Some Preparations mentioned, at least in the later editions of the London Dispensatory, are omiited in his Comment; and in detailing their virtues, he often wants precision, refembling Salinon's crudity, more than the accuracy and reflection of Quincy and Lewis; making many medicines good almost for every thing, from apoplexies down to corns; and sometimes contradicting the virtues he had before ascribed to them. This may be exemplified in what he had affirmed of Nitre, p. 265, and unsays of it, 267, to which we refer below *.

Again, some Preparations are much too generally recommended, without any distinctions being made as to the different causes, circumstances, and periods of the same disease ; or the great diversity of consticution, season, age, or sex. Nevertheless, as the Author professes to have composed and compiled it, under a complication of diseases and infirmities, to some of which it might afford a kind of palliative and amusing suspension, a benevolent Reader will pardon any lictle supervening nap, to which the perusal of it may dispose him; when he reflects, the intention of the work was certainly humane; and that it may be attended with more good than evil, were it only from a mere ascertainment of the doses of many medicines.—'The Doctor's truly modest estimation of his own performance, and the following humble address and .

'

* Antihecticum et antiphthisicum eft, vel adversus tabem pollet, et dolores mitiga, 265.--Noceat tamen internus ejus usus in ulce. rosis afieclibus in Phihisi, quoniam expertum est nullius commodi in hisce querelis ; exiftimatur autem irritationem augere, et dari neutiquum debet, inquit Geoff.oy. .

apology

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