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afrnple countryman, who had in his person all tealth and vigour which a rustic life affords, and t the age of thirty-two, having, three years - married an honest maid, of whom he always ared doatingly fond, was attending her corpse at rave with many heavy sighs and floods, of tears. e end of the funeral-service, as they began to = zrave with the earth, he wrung his hi. tore and was ready to throw himself into the

to- n the coffin, vehemently exclaiming that v. 1.3 not survive her.—It happened that a buxom , the same parish, whose name was Patience, a rading by, and on whom the honest countrytirnes had cast a wistful look, who seeing him , i.e.f. and grieving so much for the loss of his ith great, concern said to him, “John, John,

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round, and seeing who it was that spoke to him, in a fit of ecstasy replied, “Egad, so I will, to-morlow, if thou wilt have me.” PhotoGUE TO THE IN consta NT,

Like hungry guests a sitting audience looks:
Plays are like suppers; poets are the cooks:
The founders you: the table is the place:
The carvers we : the prologue is the grace :
Each act a course; each scene a different dish:
Tho' we're in Lent, I doubt you're still for flesh,
Satire's the sauce, high-season'd, sharp, and rough;
Kind masks and beaux, I hope you're pepper-proof.
Wit, is the wine; but 'tis so scarce the true,
Poets, like vintners, balderdash and brew.
Your surly scenes, where rant and bloodshed join,
Are butcher's meat; a battle's a sirloin :
Your scenes of love, so flowing, soft, and chaste,
Are water-gruel, without salt or taste.
Bawdy's fat venison, which, tho' stale, can please:
Your rakes love haut-gouts, like your d-d French
cheese.
Your rarity, for the fair guest to gape on,
Is your nice squeaker, or Italian capon ;
Or your French virgin-pullet, garnish’d round,
And dress'd with sauce of some—four hundred pound.
An opera, like an oglio, nicks the age ; -
Farce is the hasty-pudding of the stage;
For when you're treated with indifferent cheer,
You can dispense with slender stage-coach fare.
A pastoral's whipt cream ; stage whims, mere trash ;
And tragi-comedy, half fish and flesh.
But comedy, that, that's the darling cheer;
This night, we hope, you'll an Inconstant bear:
Wild fowl is lik'd in playhouse all the year.
Yet since each mind betrays a different taste,
And every dish scarce pleases ev'ry guest,
If aught you relish, do not damn the rest.
This favour crav'd, up let the music strike :
You're welcome all–Now fall too where you like.
FARquhar.

In Ecover Y of A speNDTH RIFT. A nobleman whose son was a hard drinker, and had

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been cutting down all the trees upon his estate, in - r the never employed himself in gardening; he first a sariner, his father was a farmer. He (witness) ed to be a farmer fifteen or sixteen years ago; *ased because he had then learnt that business b he now is. “Who did you learn it of "–“Is a proper question, my lord?” “I see no objecto it.”—" Then I will answer it; I learnt of Hulme, my brother-in-law; he practised the same e Whitworth doctors, and they were regular Crisix. ... Dauncey. Where did they take their degrees’

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In an Act of Parliament made in 1815, entitled “An Act for the better regulating the practice of Apothecaries,” there is a very salutary clause, which enacts, “that from and after the first day of August, 1815, it shall not be lawful for any person (except persons already in practice as such) to practise as an apothecary in any part of England or Wales, unless he or they shall have been examined by the Court of Examiners of the Apothecaries' Company, and shall have received a certificate as such.” The first conviction under this Act took place at the Staffordshire Lent Assizes of 1819, before Sir William Garrow, when the Apothecaries' Company brought an action against a man of the name of Warburton, for having practised as an apothecary without being duly ... The defendant it appeared was the son of a man who in the early part of his life had been a gardener, but afterwards set up as a cow leech. The facts were stated by Mr. Dauncey for the prosecution, and supported by evidence. Mr. Jervis, for the defence, called the father of the defendant, Arnold Warburton, to prove that he had * as an apothecary before the passing of the ct. Cross-eramined by Mr. Dauncey. Afr. Dauncey. Mr. Warburton, have you always been a surgeon 3 Witness appealed to the judge whether this was a proper answer. The Judge. I have not heard any answer; Mr. Dauncey has put a question. Witness. Must I answer it? Judge. Yes: why do you object? Witness. I don't think it a proper answer. e Judge. I presume you mean question, and I differ from you in opinion.

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The PLEASURES OF BRIGHTo N. A new Song by the Civic Visitants. Here's fine Mrs. Hoggins fom Aldgate, Miss Dobson and Deputy Dump, Mr. Spriggins has left Norton-Falgate, And so has Sir Christopher Crump. From Shoreditch, Whitechapel, and Wapping, Miss Potts, Mr. Grub, Mrs. Keats, In the waters of Brighton are popping, Or killing their time in its streets. And it's O ! what will become of us? Dear ! the vapours and blueDevils will seize upon some of us If we have nothing to do.

This here, ma'am, is Sally, my daughter,
Whose shoulder has taken a start,
And they tell me, a dip in salt water
Will soon make it straight as a dart:—
Mr. Banter assured Mrs. Mumps,
(But he's always a playing his fun,)
That the camel that bathes with two humps, *
Very often comes out with but one.
And it's O ! &c.
And here is my little boy Jacky,
Whose godfather gave me a hint,
That by salt-water baths in a crack he
Would cure his unfortunate squint.
Mr. Yellowly's looking but poorly,
It isn't the jaundice, I hope;
Wou'd you recommend bathing o O surely,
And let him take plenty of soap.
And it's O ! &c.

Your children torment you to jog 'em
On donkeys that stand in a row,

But the more you belabour and flog 'em,
The more the cross creatures won't go.

T'other day, ma'am, I thump'd and I cried,
And my darling, roar'd louder than me,

But the beast wouldn't budge till the tide Had bedraggled me up to the knee!

And it's O ! &c.

quired of Charles Townshend, who had iust returned }. a visit to him, “Well Charles, how does my graceless dog of a son go on 7" “Why, I should think, my lord,” said Charles, “he is on the recovery, as I left i. drinking the woods,”

LEARNED Apotheca RY.

In an Act of Parliament made in 1815, entitled “An Act for the better regulating the practice of Apothecaries,” there is a very salutary clause, which , enacts, “that from and after the first day of August, 1815, it shall not be lawful for any person (except persons already in practice as such) to practise as an apothecary in any part of England or Wales, unless he or they shall have been examined by the Court of Examiners of the Apothecaries' Company, and shall have received a certificate as such.” The first conviction under this Act took place at the Staffordshire Lent Assizes of 1819, before Sir William Garrow, when the Apothecaries' Company brought an action against a man of the name of Warburton, for having practised as an apothecary without being duly ... The defendant it appeared was the son of a man who in the early part of his life had been a gardener, but afterwards set up as a cow leech. The facts were stated by Mr. Dauncey for the prosecution, and supported by evidence. Mr. Jervis, for the defence, called the father of the defendant, Arnold Warburton, to prove that he had * as an apothecary before the passing of the Act. Cross-eramined by Mr. Dauncey. Asr. Dauncey. Mr. Warburton, have you always been a surgeon 3 Witness appealed to the judge whether this was a proper answer. The Judge. I have not heard any answer; Mr. Dauncey has put a question. Witness. Must I answer it? Judge. Yes: why do you object? Witness. I don't think it a proper answer. Judge. I presume you mean question, and I differ

from you in opinion.

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tness. I don't believe they ever took a degree. hen were they regular physicians?—“No I e they were not, they were only doctors.”— y doctors; were they doctors in law, physic, or 3 *-* They doctored cows, and other things, muans as well.” “ Doubtless, as well ; and doubt not, have doctored brute animals as well ian creatures t”—“I have.”

re to Witness. “Did you ever make up any ye by the prescription of a physician "–“I id.” “IDo you understand the characters they ounces, scruples, and drachms ?”—“I do not.” you cannot make up their W. from them "-" I cannot, but I can make up as dicines in my way, as they can in theirs.” proportion does an ounce bear to a pound?"— -]—" There are 16 ounces to the pound, but as go by any regular weight, we mix ours by 1.” “ Do you bleed!”—“Yes.” “With a with a lancet?”—“With a lancet.” “Do ..i from the vein or from the artery"— the vein.” “There is an artery somewhere temples; what is the name of that artery " -at pretend to have as much learning as some - Cân you tell me the name of that

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THE PLEASUREs of Brighton. A new Song by the Civic Visitants. Here's fine Mrs. Hoggins flom Aldgate, Miss Dobson and Deputy Dump, Mr. Spriggins has left Norton-Falgate, And so has Sir Christopher Crump. From Shoreditch, W. and Wapping, Miss Potts, Mr. Grub, Mrs. Keats, In the waters of Brighton are popping, Or killing their time in its streets. And it's O ! what will become of us? Dear ! the vapours and blueDevils will seize upon some of us If we have nothing to do.

This here, ma'am, is Sally, my daughter,
Whose shoulder has taken a start,

And they tell me, a dip in salt water
Will soon make it straight as a dart:-

Mr. Banter assured Mrs. Mumps,
(But he's always a playing his fun,)

That the camel that bathes with two humps, *
Very often comes out with but one.

And it's O ! &c.

And here is my little boy Jacky,
Whose godfather gave me a hint,
That by salt-water baths in a crack he
Would cure his unfortunate squint.
Mr. Yellowly's looking but o
It isn't the jaundice, I hope;
Wou'd you recommend bathing o O surely,
And let him take plenty of soap.
And it's O ! &c.
Your children torment you to jog 'em
On donkeys that stand in a row,
But the more you belabour and flog 'em,
The more the cross creatures won't go.
T'other day, ma'am, I thump'd and I cried,
And my darling, roar'd louder than me,
But the beast wouldn't budge till the tide
Had bedraggled me up to the knee!
And it's O ! &c.

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