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harm than good. For in another place he says, Many have been ruined by buying good pennyworths. Again, It is foolish to lay out money in a purchase of repentance; and yet this folly is practised every day at auctions, for want of minding the Almanack. Many a one, for the sake of finery on the back, have gone with a hungry belly, and half-starved their families; Silks and satins, scarlet and velvets, put out the kitchen-fire, as poor Richard says. These are not the necessaries of life; they can scarcely be called the conveniences; and yet only because they look pretty, how many want to have them By these and other extravagances, the genteel are reduced to poverty, and forced to borrow of those whom they formerly despised, but who, through industry and frugality, have maintained their standing; in which case it plainly appears, that a ploughman on his legs is higher than a gentleman on his knees, as poor Richard says. Perhaps they have had a small estate left them, which they to not the getting of; they think, it is day, and will never be night; that a little to be spent out of so much is not worth minding; but Always taking out of the meal-tub, and o wn, soon comes to the bottom, as poor Richard says ; and then, When the well is dry, they know the worth of water. But this they might have known before, if they had taken his advice: If you would know the value of money, go and try to borrow some ; for he that goes a borrowing goes a sorrowing, as r Richard says; and indeed so does he that lends to such F. when he goes to get it again. Poor Dick farther advises, and says—Fond pride of dress is sure a very curse; Ere fancy you consult, consult your purse. “And again, Pride is as loud a beggar as want, and a great deal more saucy. When you have bought one fine thing, you must buy ten more, that your ap*. may be all of a piece; but poor Dick says, t is easier to suppress the first desire, than to satisfy all that follow it; and it is as truly folly for the poor to ape the rich, as for the frog to swell in order to equal the ox, Vessels large may venture more, But little boats should keep near shore.

It is, however, a folly soon punished; for, as poor Richard says, Pride that dines on vanity, sups on contempt; pride breakfasted with plenty, #. with poverty, and supped with infamy. And, after all, of what use is this pride of appearance, for which so much is risked, so much is suffered It cannot promote health, nor ease pain; it makes no increase of merit in the person, it creates envy, it hastens misfortune. “But what madness must it be to run in debt for these superfluities? We are offered, by the terms of a sale, six months credit; and that perhaps, has induced some of us to attend it, because we cannot spare the ready-money, and hope now to be fine wishout it. But, ah think what you do when you run in debt; you give to another power over your liberty. If you cannot pay at the time, you will be ashamed to see your creditor; you will be in fear when yes speak to him, you will make poor pitiful sneaking excuses, and, by degrees, come to lose your ver-city and sink into base, downright lying; for. The so vice is lying, the first is running into debt, as poor Richard says; and, again, to the same purpose, Lying rides upon debt's back; whereas a free-born Englishman ought not to be ashamed nor afraid to see or speak to any man living. But poverty often deprive. of all spirit . ...” It 3. hard o: empty bag to stand upright. What would you think of that prince, or that government, who should issue an edict forbidding you to dress like a gentleman or gentlewoman, on pain of imprisonment or servitude.” Would you not say that you were free, have a right to dress as you please, and that such an edict would be a breach of your privileges, and such a government tyrannical ? o yet you are about to put yourself under that tyranny when you run in deli fee surī. dress! Your creditor has authority, at his Plessee. to deprive you of your liberty, by confiuing yea is gaol É. life, or by selling you for a servant, if yoshould not be able to pay him. When you have your bargain, you may, perhaps, think httle of Pasinent; but, as poor Richard says, Creditors are better memories than debtors; creditors are a superstitious sect, great observers of set days and tissues. The day comes round before you are aware, and the demand is made before vou are prepared to satisf it; or, if you bear your 3. in mind, the term, . at first seemed so long, will, as it lessens, appear extremely short: Time will seem to have added wings to his heels as well as his shoulders. Those have a short Lent who owe money to be paid at Easter. At present, perhaps, you may think yourselves in thriving circumstances, and that you can bear a little extravagance without injury; but— For age and want save while you may, No morning sun lasts a whole day ! Gain may be temporary and uncertain, but ever, while you live, expense is constant and certain; and It is easier to build two chimnies than to keep one in fuel, as poor Richard says: so, rather go to bed supperless, than rise in debt. Get what you can, and what you get hold; Tis the stone that will turn all your lead into gold. And when you have got the philosopher's stone, sure you will no longer complain of bad times, or the diffisulty of paying taxes. “This doctrine, my friends, is reason and wisdom : but, after all, do not depend too much upon your own ind ustry, and frugality, and prudence, though excellent things, for they may all be blasted, without the blessing of Heaven; and therefore ask that blessing humbly, and be not uncharitable to those that at resent seem to want it, but comfort and help them. member, Job suffered, and was afterwards prosperoil"And now, to conclude, Experience keeps a dear *hool, but fools will learn in no other, (as poor Richard says,) and scarcely in that; for it is true, We may give aivio, but we cannot give conduct: however, remember this, They that will not be counselled, randot be helped; and farther, that, If you will not hear Reason, she will surely rap your knuckles, as poor Richard says." Thus the old gentleman ended his harangue. The ople heard it, and approved the doctrine—and immediately practised the contrary, just as if it had been a common sermon; for the auction opened, and they began to buy extravagantly.

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dialogue serween as tarsh rowszerek and an ENGLISH MANEnglishman. Holloa, house ! Innkeeper. I don't know any one of that name. Eng. Are you the master of the inn Inn. Yes, sir, please your honour, when my wife's from home. Eng. Have you a bill of fare? Inn. Yes, sir, the fair of Mollingar and Ballinaslee is next week. Eng. I see—How are your beds? Inn. Very well, I thank you, sir. Eng. Have you any mountain? Inn. Yes, sir, this country is full of mountains. Eng. I mean a kind of wine. Inn. Yes, sir, all kinds from Irish white wine (butter milk) to Burgundy. Eng. Have you any porter? Inn. Yes, sir, Pat is an excellent porter; he'll go any where. Eng. No, I mean porter to drink. Inn, Oh, sir, he'd drink the ocean, never fear him for that. Eng. Have you any fish? Inn. They call me an odd fish. Eng. I think so. I hope your not a shark. Inn. No, sir, indeed, I am not a lawyer. Eng. Have you any soles . Inn. For your boots or shoes, sir? Eng. Psha' have you any plaice 1 Inn. No, sir, but I was promised one if I would vote for Mr. B. Eng. Have you any wildfowl Inn. They are tame enough now, for they have been killed these three days. Eng. I must see, myself. Inn. And welcome, sir, I'll fetch you the lookingglass.

JAMEs I. AND DIR. au Ch.A.N.An. When Dr. Buchanan was asked how he came to make a pedant of James, his royal pupil, he answered o: thought he did a great deal to make anything QI Illin.

A splex Drd Entertain MENT.

Foote having been invited to dine with the late duke of Leinster, at Dublin, gave the following account of this entertainment: As to splendour, as far as it went, I admit it, there was a very fine sideboard of plate; and if a man could have swallowed a silversmith's shop, there was enough to satisfy him; but as to all the rest—his mutton was white, his veal was red, the fish was kept too long, the venison not kept long enough : to sum up all, every thing was cold except his ice; and every thing sour except his vinegar.

Moliene's GRAve.

When Moliere, the comic poet, died, the archbishop of Paris would not let his body be buried in consecrated ground. The king, being informed of this, sent for the archbishop, and expostulated with him; but, finding the prelate inflexibly obstinate, his majesty asked, how many feet deep the consecrated ground reached? This question coming by surprise, the archbishop replied, about eight. “Well,” answered the king, “I find there's no getting the better of your scruples; therefore, let his grave be dug twelve feet deep, that's four below your consecrated ground, and let him be buried there."

Frtrup Rick Tiir Great AND zA RF-M B.A. General Zaremba had a very long Polish name; the king of Prussia had heard of it, and one day said to him, “Pray, Zaremba, what is your name 2" The general told him the whole of it. “Heavens !” said the king, “the devil himself has not such a name 1”—“Why should he " replied Zaremba, “he is no relation to me, if he is to your majesty.” The LATE Lond Wiscount sackville. His lordship was one day entering his house in Pall Mall, when he observed a basket of vegetables standing in the hall, and inquired of the porter to whom they belonged, and from whence they came * Old John immediately replied, “They are ours,” my lord, “from our country-house.”—“Very well,” rejoined the peer.” At that instant a carriage stopped at the door, and lord George, turning round, askcd

what coach it was. “Ours,” said honest John. “And are the children in it curs too?" said his lordship, laughing. “Most certainly, my lord,” replied John, with the utmost gravity, and immediately ran to lift them out.

Fili.Al Affection.

The late Mr. Philip Thicknesse, father of lord Audley, being in want of money, applied to his son for assistance. . This being denied, he immediately hired a cobbler's stall, directly opposite his lordship's house, and put up a board, on which was inscribed. in large letters, “Boots and shoes mended in the best and cheapest manner, by Philip Thicknesse, father of lord Audley.” His i.o took the hint, and the board was removed.

A N U. N. Tiniel Y Drexi-x d.

A provincial actress was performing the part of lady Ann, in King Richard the Third; and on delivering the following passage —

“When shall I have rest *"

she was answered by her washerwoman, from the pit, who exclaimed, “Never, 'till you pay me my three shillings and twopence.”

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*NACH to Nisars 1N PAINTING AND sculptu RE.

In a painting in a country church in Germany, "lended for the Sacrifice of Isaac, is represented Abraham with a blunderbuss in his haud, ready to "out his son, and an angel, suddenly coming down * heaven, pouring a certain water on the pan.

n a painting at Windsor, by Antonio Verrio, he * introduced himself, Sir Godfrey Kneller, and *P. May, surveyor of the works, in long periwigs, pectators of Christ healing the sick. A painter of Toledo once painted the story of the rec Wise Men of the East coming to worship at thlehem, where he represented them as three Arabian Indian kings; two of them were white, and one of in black; but, when he drew the latter part of on kneeling, he made three black feet for the negro og and three white feet for the two white kings. In the monument of Sir Cloudesley Shovel, in estminster Abbey, he is represented rising out of sea, with a full-bottomed wig well powdered and fed. in a church at Bruges is a picture of the Marriage Jesus Christ with Saint Catherine of Sienna, by Porcinic, the patron of the church. The Virgin v joining their hands, and King David playing harp at the wedding. obert Durer has represented an angel, in a sced petticoat, driving Adam and Eve from Pa*...is cigali painted a picture of the Circumcision - Holy Child, Jesus, and drew the high priest, on, with spectacles on his nose.

* Picture painted by F. Chello della Puera, the .it virgin is placed on a velvet sofa, playing , cat and a paroquet, and about to help herself *...e. from an engraved coffee-pot. ...other picture painted by Peter of Cortona, ... assing the reconciliation of Jacob and Laban, ... the French Museum,) the painter has represteeple or belfry rising over the trees. vocronese placed Benedictine fathers and his paintings from the Old Tes

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In the illuminations of a manuscript Bible at Paris, under the Psalms, are two persons playing at cards; and under Job and the Prophets are coats of arms and a windmill.

Poussin, in his picture of the Deluge, has painted boats, not then invented.

EPITA PH ON COOKE, THE CELEBRATED Actor. Pause, thoughtful stranger : pass not heedless by, Where Cooke awaits the tribute of a sigh. Here sunk in death those powers the world admired, By nature given, not by art acquired. In various parts his matchless talents shone, The one he failed in was, alas! his own.

Burt I ed a LIVE,

A lady once told St. Foix, that in her will she had ordered her body to be opened after her death, as she was afraid of being buried alive.

Ax ENTERTAIN ING Journey.

Dodd the comedian was very fond of a long story. —Being in company one night, he began at twelve o'clock to relate a journey he had taken to Bath: and, at six o'clock in the morning, he had proceeded no farther than the Devizes t—The company then rose, to separate; when Dodd, who could not bear to be curtailed in his narrative, cried, “Don’t go yet; stay and hear it out, and upon my soul I'll make it entertaining !”

post in U Mous Gurrrr.

Philips, in his Pastorals, makes shepherdesses tear their hair and beat their breasts at their own deaths: “Ye brighter maids, faint emblems of my fair, With looks cast down, and with dishevell'd hair, In bitter anguish beat your breasts, and moan Her death untimely, as it were your own.”

Pru Drent Pontin Art. A married intriguing lady insisting on having her lover's portrait, he remonstrated on the absurdity, alleging it would amount to the proclaiming their amour. “Oh,” said she, “but to prevent a discoyery, it shall not be drawn like you,'

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Footehaving been in duke of Leinster, at Dub count of this entertainm as it went, I admit it, of plate; and if a man o shop, there was as to all the rest—his was red, the fish was k kept long enough: to cold except his ice; vinegar.

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when Moliere, th . Y. * thes, deser; bishop of Paris would tr. M. of meat.” scribed to him, consecrated ground. this, sent for the arc him; but, finding t his majesty asked, crated ground reache prise, the archbishop answered the king, better of your scru dug twelve feet de crated grou

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