Abbildungen der Seite
PDF

it is not barely the ploughman's pains; the reaper's and thresher's toll, and the baker's sweat, is to be counted into the bread we eat; the plough, mill, oven, or any other utensils, must all be charged on the account of labour. Locke. Perverse mankind! whose wills, created free, Charge all their woes on absolute decree; All to the dooming gods their guilt translate, ..And follies are miscall'd the crimes of fate. Pope. We charge that upon necessity, which was really desired and chosen. atts' Logick. 4. To impute to, as cost or hazard. He was so great an encourager of commerce, that he charged himself with all the sea risk of such vessels as carried worn to Rome in winter. Arbuthnot on Coins. 5. To impose as a task: it has with before the thing imposed. The gospel chargeth us with piety towards God, and justice and charity to men, and temperance and chastity in reference to ourselves. - -- ‘s illetion. 4. To accuse : to censure. Speaking thus to you, I am so far from charging you as guilty in this matter, that I can sincerely say, I believe the exhortation wholl needless. Wale'. Preparation for Death. 7. To accuse : it has stilb before the crime. And his angels he clarged with folly. job. 8. To challenge The priest shall clarge her by an oath. Numb. Thoi canst not, cardinal, devise a name So slight, unworthy, and ridiculous, To courge me to an answer, as the pope. Shaks. 9. To cominand ; to enjoin. I may not suffer you to visit them; The kinghath strictly charg’ 'the contrary. Shak. Why ão thou turn thy face : I charge thee, answer To what I shall enquire. - I charge thee, stand, And tell thy name, and business in the land. Dryden,

Dryden.

10. To fall upon ; to attack. With his prepared sword he charges home M; unprovided body, lanc'd my arm; Shakt. The Grecians rally, and their pow'rs unite; With fury charge us, and renew the fight. Dryd. 11. To burden; to load. Here's the smell of blood still: all the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand. Oh! oh! oh! What a sigh is there! The heart is sorely charged. Shakspeare. When often urg'd, unwilling to be great, Your country calls you from your lov'd retreat, And sends to senates, clarg’d with common care, Which none more shuns, and none can better car. I}ryden. Meat swallowed down for pleasure and greediness, only charges the stomach, or funes into the brain. Teof... A fault in the ordinary method of education, is the charging of cuildren's memories with rules and precepts. Locke. The brief with weighty crimos was charg’d, On which the pleader much enlarg’d. Sowiń. 12. To cover with something adventitious. It is pity the obelisks in Rome, had not been tharged with several parts of the Egyptian histories, instead of hieroglyphicks. Adition on Italy. 13. To fix, as for fight. Obsolete. He rode up and down, gallantly mounted, and charged and discharged his lance. Knol/g. “ To load a gun with powder and bulets. To CR A R G E. .... m. To make an or set. Like your Worces of antiquity, he org's in

C H A iron, and seems to despise all ornament but intrinsick merit. Granvilla. CH A R G E. m. s. [from the verb.] 1. Care; custody; trust to defend. A hard division, when the harmless sheep Must leave their lambs to hungry wolves in charge. Fairfax He enquired many things, as well concerning the princes which had the charge of the city, whether they were in hope to defend the same. Knolles's History of the Irir. 2. Precept ; mandate; command. Saul might even lawfully have offered to God those reserved spoils, had not the Lord, in that particular case, given special charge to the contrary. - - Hooker. It is not for nothing, that St. Paul giveth charge to beware of philosophy; that is to say, such knowledge as men by natural reason attain unto. Hooker. One of the Turks laid down letters upon a stone, saying, that in them was contained that they had in charge. Anoles. The leaders having charge frcm you to stand, Will not go off until they hear you speak. Slais. He, who requires From us no other service than to keep This one, this easy charge; of all the trees In Paradise, that bear delicious fruit So various, not to taste that only tree Of knowledge, planted by the tree of life. Milt. 3. Commission ; trust conferred ; office. If large possessions, pompous titles, honourable charger, and profitable commissions, could have made this proud man happy, there would have been nothing wanting. L'Estrange. Go first the master of thy herds to find, True to his sharge, a loyal swain and kind. Poor. 4. It had anciently sometimes over before the thing committed to trust. I gave my brother charge over Jerusalem; for he was a faithful man, and feared God above many. Netzaick. 5. It has of before the subject of command Or trust. Hast thou eaten of the tree, .

Whereof. I gave thee charge thou should'st not eat f Milton.

6. It has upon before the person charged. He loves God with all his heart, that is, with that degree of love, which is the highest point of our duty, and of God's charge upon us. Taylor's Rule of Living Holy. 7. Accusation; imputation. We need not lay new matter to his charge : Beating your officers, cursing yourselves. Skal. These very men are continually reproaching the clergy, and laying to their charge the pride, the avarice, the laxury, the ignorance, aid so-perstition, of Polish times. ot-for8. The person or thing entrusted to the care or management of another. Why hasto Satan, broke the bounds prescrib'd To thy transgressions, and disturb’d the charge Of others? Milton's Paradise Lost. More had he said, but, fearful of her stay, The starry guardian drove his clarge *% To some fresh pasture. ryden. Our guardian angel saw them where they sata Above the paince of our slumb'ring king; He sigh'd, bandoning his courg to fate. Drya. This o should be the govornour's principal care; that an habitual gracefulness and politeress, in all his carriage, may be settled in his charge, as much as inay be, tel, or he goes out

[ocr errors]

* 9. An exhortation of a judge to a jury, or bishop to his clergy. The bishop has recommended this author in his charge to the clergy. Dryden. Io. Expence; cost. Being long since made weary with the huge charge which you have laid upon us, and with the strong endurance of so many complaints. Spenser. Their charge was always born by the queen, and duly paid out of the exchequer. #. Witness this army of such mass and charge, Led by a delicate and tender prince. Shop. He liv'd as kings retire, though more at large, From publick business, yet of equal charge. - - - - Tour. Y1. It is, in later times, commonly used in the plural, charges. A man ought warily to begin cargo, which once begun, will continue. Bacon's Essays. Ne'er put yourself to charges, to complain Of wrong which heretofore you did sustain. Dryder. The last pope was at considerable charges to make a little kind of harbour in this place. Addison on Italy. § 2. Onset. And giving a charge upon their enemies, like lions, they slew eleven thousand footmen, and sixteen hundred horsemen, and put all the others to fight. 2 Macz. Honourable retreats are no ways inferiour to brave charges; as having less of fortune, more of discipline, and as much of valour. Bacon. 13. The o to fall upon enemies. Our author seems to sound a charge, and begins like the clangour of a trumpet. Dryden. 14. The posture of a weapon fitted for the attack or combat. Their neighing coursers daring of the spur, Their armed staves in charge, their beavers down. Skałpeare. 15. A load, or burden. Asses of great clarge. 16. What any thing can bear. Take of aqua-fortis two ounces, of quicksilver two drachms, for that charge the 24tiafortis will bear, the dissolution will not bear a fiint as big as a nutmeg. Bacon.

17. The quantity of powder and bali put into a gun. 18. Among farriers. Charge is a preparation, or a sort of ointment of the consistence of a thick decoction, which is applied to the shoulder-splaits, inflammations, and sprains of horses. A charge is of a middle, nature, between an ointment and a plaster, or between a plaster and a cataplasm. Farrier's Dict. 19. In heraldry. The clarge is that which is born upon the colour, except it be a coat divided only by partition. 1. CHA'r GE ABLE. adj. [from charge.] 1. Expensive ; costly. Divers bulwarks were demolished upon the sea-coast, in peace chargeable, and little serviceable in war. Hayopard. Neither did we eat any man's bread for nought, but wrought with labour and travel night and day, that we might not be chargeable to any of you. 2 The salonians. There was another accident of the same nature on the Sicilian side, much more pleasant, but less chargeable; for it cost nothing but wit. Wotton. Considering the chargeable methods of their

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

CHARiote'E.R. m. s. [from chariot.] He , that drives the chariot. It is used only in speaking of military' chariots, and those in the ancient publick games. The gasping charioteer beneath the wheel Of his own car. Dryden's Fables. The burning chariot, and the churiateer, In bright Bootes and his wain appear. Addison. Show us the youthful handsome charioteer, Firm in his seat, and running his career. Prior. CHAR 1 or RAC E. n. 4. [from chariot and race.] A sport anciently used, where chariots were driven for the prize, as now horses run. There is a wonderful vigour and spirit in the description of the horse and chariot race. Addison. CHA'Rior A B le. adj. [charitable, Fr. from charité.] 1. Kind in giving alms; liberal to the Oor. He that hinders a charitable person from giving alms to a poor man, is tied to restitution, if he hindered him by fraud or violence. Taylor. Shortly thou wilt behold me poor, and kneelin Before #: charitable door for bread. Rowe. How shall we then wish, that it might be allowed us to live over our lives again, in order to fill every minute of them with charitable of fices! Atterbury. Health to himself, and to his infants bread, The ab'rer bears: what his hard heart denies, His charitable vanity supplies. ope. 2. Kind in judging of others; disposed to tenderness; benevolent. How had you been my friends else ! Why have you that charitable title from thousands? did you not chiefly belong to my heart? - Shakspeare's Timon. Of a politick sermon that had no divinity, the king said to bishop Andrews, Call you this a sermon The bishop answered, by a charitable construction it may be a sermon. Bacon. CHA'RIT AB LY. adv. [from charity.] 1. Kindly; liberally; with inclination to help the poor. 2. Benevolently ; without malignity. Nothing will more enable us to bear our cross patiently, injuries charitably, and the labour of religion comfortably. Taylor. - of is best sometimes your censure to restrain, And charitably let the dull be vain. Pope. CHA'RITY. m. s. [charité, Fr. charitas, Latin.] 1. Tenderness; kindness; love. By thee, Founded in reason, loyal, just, and pure, Relations dear, and all the charities Of father, son, and brother, first were known. Milton. 2. Good-will; benevolence; disposition to think well of others. My errours, I hope, are only those of charity to mankind; and sich as my own charity has caused me to commit, that of others may more easily excuse. Dryden. 3. The theological virtue of universal love. Concerning charity, the final object whereof is that incomprehensible beauty which shineth in the countenance of Christ, the Son of the living God. Hooker. Peace, peace; for shame, if not for charity.— —Urge neither charity nor shame to me;

[ocr errors]

5. Alms; relief given to the poor. ,

Only add Deeds to thy knowledge answerable; add faith, Add virtue, patience, temperance; add love, . By name to come call'd charity, the soul Of all the rest. Milton. Faith believes the revelations of God; hope expects his promises; charity loves his excellencies and mercies. Taylor. But lasting charity's more ample sway Nor bound by time, nor subject to deeay, In happy triumph shall for ever live. Prior. Charity, or a love of God, which works by a love of our neighbour, is greater than faith or hope. 4tterbury. 4. Liberality to the poor. The heathen poet, in commending the charity of Dido to the Trojans, spoke like a christian.

Dryden.

We must incline to the king; I will look for him, and privily relieve him; go you and maintain talk with the duke, that my charity be not of him perceived. Shakspeare. The ant did well to reprove the grasshopper for her slothfulness; but †. did ill then to : her a charity in her distress. L'Estrange. I never had the confidence to beg a charity. - Dryden. To CH A R K. v. a. To burn to a black cinder, as wood is burned to make charcoal. Excess either with an apoplexy knocks a man on the head: or with a fever, like fire in a strongwater shop, burns him down to the ground; or, if it flames not out, charks him to a coal. Grew. CHA'RLATAN. m. s. [charlatan, Fr. ciar!atano, Ital. from ciarlare, to chatter.] A quack; a mountebank; an empirick. . . Saltimbanchoes, quacksalvers, and charlatant, deceive them in lower degrees. For charlatans can do no good, Until they're mounted in a crowd. Hudibrar. CH A R LATA's ic Al... adj.[from charlatan.] Quackish ; ignorant. A cowardly soldier, and a charlatanical doctor, are the principal subjects of comedy. Cowley. CHA'RLATAN RY. n.s.. [from charlatan.] Wheedling; deceit; cheating with fair words. CHAR les’-wal N. n.s. The northern constellation, called the Bear. There are seven stars in Ursa minor; and in Charles':-wain, or Plaustrum of Ursa major, seven. Brown's Vulgar Erraurs. CHA'RLock. n.s. A weed growing among the corn with a yellow flower. It is a species of Mithridate mustard. CIIARM. n. s. [charme, French; carmen, Latin.] 1. Words, or philtres, or characters, imagined to have some occult or unintelligible power. I never knew a woman so dote upon a man; surely I think you have charms—Not I, I assure thee; setting the attraction of my good parts aside, I have no other charms. so... Thera have been used, either barbarous words, of no sense, lest they should disturb the imagination; or words of similitude, that may secondand feed the imagination: and this was ever as well in heathen charms, as in charns of later times. Baccr. Alcyone he names amidst his pray'rs, Names as a charm against the waves and wind, Most in his mouth, and ever in his mind. Dryd.

[ocr errors]

Antaeus could, by magick charmor, Recover strength whene'er he fell. Soft. 2. Somcthing of power to subdue opposition, and gain the affections; something that can please irresistibly. Well sounding verses are the charm we use, Ieroick thoughts and virtue to infuse. Roscom. Nor ever hope the queen of love Will e'er thy favorite's charas improve. Prior. To fam'd Apelles when young Ammon brought The darling idol of his captive heart; And the pleas'd o with kind attention

sat, ..To have her charms recorded by his art. Waller. But what avail her unexhausted stores, Her blooming mountains, and her sunny shores, With all the gifts that heaven and earth impart, The smiles .# nature, and the charms of art, While proud oppression in her vallies reigns, And tyranny usurps her happy plains? Addison. To CH ARM. v. a. LFrom the noun.] 1. To fortify with charms against evil. Let fall thy blade on vulnerable crests; I hear a charmed life, which must not yield To one of woman born. Skal'peare. a. To make powerful by charms. 3. To summon by incantation. Upon my knees I clarx, you by my once commended beauty, § all your vows of love, and that great vow Which did incorporate and make us one. Shaks. 4. To subdue by tome secret power; to amaze 5 to overpower. I, in mime own woe charm'd, Could not find death, where I did hear him groan; Nor feel him where he struck. Shakspeare. Musick the forcest grief can charin. Pope. 5. To subdue the mind by pleasure. "T is your graces That from my motest conscience to my tongue Charms this report out. Shakspeare. Amoret! my lovely foe, Tell me where thy strength does lie, Where the pow'r that Jarms us so; In thy soul, or in thy eye Waller. Charm by accepting, by submitting sway. Pope. Chloe thus the soul alarm’d, Aw'd without sense, and without beauty charm'd. Pope. CHA'RMED. adj. Enchanted. Arcadia was the charmed circle, where all his

[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

She smiled very charmingly, and discovered it fine a set of teeth as ever eye beheld. Addio. CHA'RM is GN Ess. n.s. from charming.] The power of pleasing. CHA's N E. L. adj. [charnel, Fr.] Containing flesh, or carcasses. . Such are those thick and gloomyshadowsdamp, Oft found in charmel vaults and sepulchres Ling’ring, and sitting by a new made so Aft?!!!oo, CHA'R N E L-Hous E. m. s. [charnier, Fr. from caro, carnis, Latin.] The place under churches where the bones of the dead are reposited. If charnel-boxes and our graves must send Those, that we bury, back; our monument; Shall be the maws of kites. Shai port. • When they were in those charrel-house':eory one was placed in older, and a black Pillor of coffin set by him. - Toyor. CHART. n.s. Leharta, Lat.] Adelineasio or map of coasts, for the use of tailors, It is distinguished from a map, by ic. presenting only the coasts. e Portuguest, when they had doubled the Cape of Good Hope, found skilful pilots, usr; astronomical instruments, geographical ho and compasses. Airãutosol. CHA'RT E. R. m. s. [charta, Latin.] . . . 1. A charter is a written evidence of things done between man and man. Charters are divided into charters of the king, and charters of private persons. Chartoo of the king are those, whereby the king passeth any grant to any person or mort: or to any body politick; as a charter of exemption, that no man shall be cm. pannelled on a jury; charter of pardon, whereby a man is forgiven a felony, of other offence. Covil. 2. Any writing bestowing privileges or rights. f you deny it, let the danger light Upon your charter, and your city'sfreedom.Shah It is not to be wondered, that the great riot" terwhereby God bestowed the whole earthurch Adam, and confirmed it unto the sons of Noah, being as brief in word as large in effect, hath bred much quarrel of interpretation. Raleigh's Eliot. Here was that charter seal’d, wherein the crown All marks of arbitrary power lays down. Desk She shakes the rubbish from her mountainbrow, And seems to have renew’d her charter's date, Which heav'n will to the death of time #: - ro, God renewed this charter of man'ssovereignty rver the creatures. Solo, 3. Privilege; immunity; exemption. I must have libelty, Withal as large a charter as the wind, To blow on whom I please; for so fools have; And they that are most galled with my folly, They most must laugh. Shalopart. My mother, Who has a charter to extol her When she does praise me, grieves me. stall. CHARTER-PARTY. m. s. [chartre-partie, Fr.] A paper relating to a contrict, which each party has a copy. Charter-parties, or contracts, made even upon the high sea, touching things that are not in ther own nature marians, belong not to the admiral; jori-diction. - sk, CHA'RTERED. adj. [from charter.] Invested with privileges by charter; privileged. When he speaks, The air, a charter'd libertine, is still. Słakop. CHA's Y. arts. from care.] Careful; cautious ; wary; frugal. Over his kindred he held a wary and chary care, which bountifully was expressed, when occasion so required. Curett's Survey of Cornwall. The chari: ; maid is prodigal enough, if she unmas!, her beauty to the moon. Shaksp. To CHASE. v. a. Leżasser, French.] I. To hunt. it shall be as the chord roe. Iraiah. Mine enemies closed me sore like a bird. - 1.amentations. 2. To pursue as an enemy. And Abimelech coased him, and he fled before him. udges. Cne of you shall chase a thousand. 19eut. 2. To dive away. o He that chaseth away his mother, is a son that cause:h shame. Proverbs. 4. To follow as a thing desirable. s. To drive. Thus chased by their brother's endless malice from prince to prince, and from place to place, they, for their safety, fied at last to the city of Bisennis. Knolley's History of the Turks. When the following morn had coas'd away The flying stars, and light restor'd the day. Dryden. To Co. As E Meza's. See To Ex C H As E. CHA's E. r. s. [from the verb.] 1. Hunting; as, the pleasures of the chase. 2. Pursuit of any thing as game. Whilst he was hast'ning in the coase, it seems, Of this fair coole, meets he on the way ‘i he father of this seeming lady. Sha&#eare. There is no close more pleasant, methinks, than to drive a thought, by good conduct, from one end of the world to another, and never to lose sight cf: tilt it fall into eternity. Burnet. 3. Fitness to be hunted; appropriation to coase or sport. Concerning the beasts of clare, whereof the buck is the first, he is called the first year a tawn. Shakspeare. A maid I am, and of thy virgin train; Oh! let me still that spotless name retain, Frequent the forests, thy chaste will obey, And only ina'-e the beasts of chase my prey. - Dryden. 4. Pursuit of an enemy, or of something noxious. The admiral, with such ships only as could suddenly be put in readiness, made forth with them; and such as came daily in, we set upon inem, and gave them chose. usto’. He sallied out upon them with certain troops of horsemen, with such violence, that he overthrew thrm, and, having them in chare, did seedy execution. Knollo' History of the Turks. They seek that joy, which us’d to glow Fxranded on the hero's face, When the thick squadrons prest the foe, And Willian led the sloilous-base. Arior. 5. Pursuit of something as desirable. set this mad close of fame, by few pursued, Ho drawn destruction on the multitude. Dryd. 6. The game hunted. She, seeing the towering of her pursued ore, ~fnt circlins about, riding so with the less sense •t rising, . - Si-ky

[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]

Howard. seek thee out some other court, For I myself must put this deer to death. Shah. Honour's the noblest chase; pursue that game, And recompense the loss of love with fame. , Granville. 7. Open ground stored with such beasts as are hunted. A receptacle for deer and game, of a middle nature between a forest and a park; being commonly less than a forest, and not endued with so many liberties; and yet of a larger compass, and stored with greater diversity of game, than a park. A chase differs from a forest in this, because it may be in the hands of a subject, which a forest, in its proper nature, cannot : and from a park, in that it is not inclosed, and hath not only a larger compass, and more store of game, but likewise moie keepers and overseers. Cotocil. He and his lady both are at the lodge, Upon the north side of this pleasant chore. Soap. 8. The CHAs E of a gun, is the whole bore or length of a piece, taken withinside. ChambersCHAs E-G UN. r. s. [from chase and gun.] Guns in the forepart of the ship, fired upon those that are pursued. Mcan time the Belgians tack upon our rear. And raking chase-guns through our stern they send. Dry-inCHA's ER. m. s. [from chase.] 1. Hunter; pursuer; driver. Then began A stop i' th' charrr, a retire; anon A rout, confusion thick. Skopetro. So fast he flies, that his reviewing eye |Has lost the claieri, and his ear the Čry. Donk. Stretch'd on the lawn, his second hope survey. At once the co-ser, and at once the prey ! Lo, Rufus, tugging at the deadly dart, Bleeds in the forest like a wounded hart! Poor. 2. An cinchaser. CHAs M. n. s. (X&o J 1. A breach unclosed; a cleft; a gap; an opening. n all that visible corporeal world, we see no claims or gaps. .ock”. The water of this orb communicates with that of the ocean, by means of certain hiatuses or chosz passing betwixt it and the bottom of the ocean. J;’oodward. The ground adust her riven mouth disparts, Horrible chasm / profound. kilor2. A placed unfilled; a vacuity. Some lazy ages, lost in ease, No action leave to busy chronicles; Such, whose supine felicity but makes In story claims, in epochas mistakes. Dryder. CHA'SSELMS. m. s. LFrench.] A sort of grape. CHASTE. adj. [charte, Fr. castus, Lat.], 1. Pure from all commerce of sexes; as, a chaste virgin. Diana coaste, and Hebe fair. Prior. 2. With respect to language, pure ; uncorrupt ; not mixed with barbarous phrases. 3. Free from obscenity. Among words which signify the same principal ideas, some are clean and decent, others unclean: some obitte, others obscene. PWatts' Losi, i. 4. True to the marriage bed. Love your children; be discreet, charte, keepo

sis at home. a 4.4

[ocr errors]
« ZurückWeiter »