Shakespeare in Performance: A Collection of Essays

Cover
Frank Occhiogrosso
University of Delaware Press, 2003 - 147 Seiten
The essays in this book deal with the nature of performance criticism, performance history, state and screen productions of Shakespeare and the physical playhouse. These essays, by John Russell Brown, James Bulman, Ralph Berry, Herbert Coursen, Jay Halio, James Lusardi, June Schlueter, Harry Keyishian, Alan Dessen, Pauline Kiernan, and Marvin Rosenberg, represent some of the best current thinking on the roles of performance in criticism of Shakespeare.

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Inhalt

Introduction
7
Shakespeare in Performance Study and Criticism
15
Shylock Antonio and the Politics of Performance
27
The Merchant of Venice
47
Romeo and Juliet in Performance
58
I Have done the deed Macbeth 22
71
Disguise in Trevor Nunns Twelfth Night
84
Patterns of Imagery in Stuart Burges Julius Caesar
93
Teaching Whats Not There
104
The New Globe
113
Tracking Performance Criticism of Shakespeare
123
Bibliography
137
List of Contributors
141
Index
142
Urheberrecht

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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 28 - I hate him for he is a Christian ; But more for that in low simplicity He lends out money gratis, and brings down The rate of usance here with us in Venice. If I can catch him once upon the hip, I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him.
Seite 119 - To make a child now swaddled, to proceed Man, and then shoot up, in one beard and weed, Past threescore years...
Seite 102 - And Caesar's spirit ranging for revenge, With Ate by his side come hot from hell, Shall in these confines with a monarch's voice Cry ' Havoc,' and let slip the dogs of war ; That this foul deed shall smell above the earth With carrion men, groaning for burial.
Seite 31 - Signior Antonio, many a time and oft In the Rialto you have rated me About my moneys and my usances : Still have I borne it with a patient shrug ; For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe. You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog, And spit upon my Jewish gaberdine, And all for use of that which is mine own.
Seite 74 - That which hath made them drunk hath made me bold; What hath quench'd them hath given me fire.
Seite 107 - Let's kill him boldly, but not wrathfully; Let's carve him as a dish fit for the gods, Not hew him as a carcass fit for hounds...
Seite 119 - He rather prays you will be pleas'd to see One such to-day, as other plays should be ; Where neither chorus wafts you o'er the seas...
Seite 51 - Most noble gentlemen, and my worthy patrons! It may seem strange, that I, your Scoto Mantuano, who was ever wont to fix my bank in face of the public Piazza, near the shelter of the Portico to the Procuratia, should now, after eight months' absence from this illustrious city of Venice, humbly retire myself into an obscure nook of the Piazza.
Seite 119 - I might guess by's mustering up the ghosts And policies not incident to hosts ; But chiefly by that one perspicuous thing, Where he mistook a player for a king, For when he would have said, ' King Richard died, And call'd, a horse ! a horse ! ' he ' Burbage

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