An Easy Introduction to the Game of Chess: Containing One Hundred Examples of Games, and a Great Variety of Critical Situations and Conclusions, Including the Whole of Philidor's Analysis, with Selections from Stamma, the Calabrois, &c, to which are Added, Caissa, a Poem, by Sir William Jones, The Morals of Chess, by Dr. Franklin, &c

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Baldwin, Cradock and Joy, 1820 - 254 Seiten
 

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Ausgewählte Seiten

Inhalt

I
1
II
2
III
5
IV
6
V
7
VII
9
VIII
11
IX
13
LIII
85
LIV
86
LV
87
LVI
88
LVII
89
LVIII
90
LIX
91
LX
92

X
13
XI
13
XII
13
XIII
14
XIV
16
XV
17
XVI
18
XVII
32
XIX
35
XXI
36
XXII
37
XXIII
40
XXIV
41
XXV
42
XXVI
45
XXVII
47
XXVIII
49
XXIX
51
XXX
52
XXXI
53
XXXII
55
XXXIII
56
XXXIV
57
XXXV
58
XXXVI
59
XXXVII
60
XXXVIII
61
XXXIX
64
XL
65
XLI
67
XLII
68
XLIII
70
XLIV
72
XLV
73
XLVI
74
XLVII
77
XLVIII
78
XLIX
79
L
80
LI
83
LII
84
LXII
93
LXIII
94
LXIV
95
LXV
96
LXVII
97
LXVIII
98
LXIX
99
LXX
100
LXXI
101
LXXII
102
LXXIII
103
LXXIV
104
LXXV
105
LXXVI
106
LXXVII
107
LXXVIII
108
LXXIX
109
LXXX
110
LXXXI
111
LXXXII
112
LXXXIII
113
LXXXIV
114
LXXXV
115
LXXXVI
116
LXXXVII
117
LXXXIX
118
XC
120
XCI
121
XCII
123
XCIII
125
XCIV
127
XCV
129
XCVI
130
XCVII
131
XCVIII
132
XCIX
134
C
195
CI
203
CV
219
CVI
227
CVII
230

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Beliebte Passagen

Seite 219 - Caution, not to make our moves too hastily. This habit is best acquired by observing strictly the laws of the game ; such as, " If you touch a piece, you must move it somewhere ; if you set it down, you must let it stand...
Seite 220 - ... and it is therefore best that these rules should be observed ; as the game thereby becomes more the image of human life, and particularly of war ; in which, if you have incautiously put yourself into a bad and dangerous position, you cannot obtain your enemy's leave to withdraw your troops, and place them more securely, but you must abide all the consequences of your rashness. And, lastly, we learn by chess the habit of not being discouraged by present bad appearances in the state of our affairs,...
Seite 219 - If I move this piece, what will be the advantage of my new situation? What use can my adversary make of it to annoy me? What other moves can I make to support it and to defend myself from his attacks?
Seite 216 - ... tis e'en a joy to yield). Each guileful snare and subtle art he tries, But finds his art less powerful than her eyes ; Wisdom and strength superior charms obey: And beauty, beauty wins the long-fought day.
Seite 209 - Hear then the tale which they to Colin sung, As idling o'er the lucid wave he hung : — A lovely Dryad rang'd the Thracian wild, Her air enchanting and her aspect mild : To chase the bounding hart was all her joy,— Averse from Hymen and the Cyprian boy : O'er hills and valleys was her beauty fam'd, And fair Caissa was the damsel nam'd.
Seite 10 - ... should not stir them till forced to it. 17. Endeavour to have a move in ambuscade ; that is, place the queen, bishop, or rook behind a pawn, or a piece, in such a manner, as...
Seite 207 - Behold four archers (e), eager to advance, Send the light reed, and rush with sidelong glance ; Through angles ever they assault the foes, True to the colour which at first they chose.
Seite 207 - He once imprison'd, all the conflict ends. The queens exulting near their consorts stand; Each bears a deadly falchion in her hand; Now here, now there, they bound with furious pride, And thin the trembling ranks from side to side; Swift as Camilla flying o'er the main, Or lightly skimming o'er the dewy plain : Fierce as they seem, some bold Plebeian spear May pierce their shield, or stop their full career.
Seite 252 - A Treatise on the Nature, Economy, and Practical Management of Bees ; in which the various Systems of the British and Foreign Apiarians are examined, and the most improved Methods laid down for effectually preserving the Lives of the Bees. Containing, also...
Seite 232 - ... was all he had to maintain a wife and six children. When the duke alighted, the clergyman, not knowing his rank, begged him to come in and dry himself; which the other accepted, by borrowing a pair of old worsted stockings and slippers, and warming himself by a good fire.

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